2010 Winter Olympics Medal Count

U.S. and Canada both won a record number of medals at the Games

Vancouver Medal Ceremony - Day 7
Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

The 2010 Winter Olympics were held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from February 12–28. More than 2,600 athletes participated, and athletes from 26 different countries won medals. The United States came out on top in the medal count—winning a total of 37—while host country Canada won the most gold, with 14.

Canada, U.S. Set Records

Interestingly, Canada finally won a medal at an Olympic Games it was hosting, having been completely shut out of the medals at the previous Olympic Games it hosted, in Calgary in 1988, and at the Summer Games in Montreal in 1976.

And, in so doing, Canada also broke the record for the most gold medals won by any country at a single Winter Olympics. The U.S. also broke the record for the most medals overall captured by a nation at a single Winter Olympics. 

Some notable U.S. athletes stood out at the Games. Shaun White earned his second consecutive Olympic gold on the half-pipe in Vancouver, having previously won in the event at the 2006 Winter Games in Turin, Italy. Bode Miller won gold, silver and bronze medals in alpine skiing, and the U.S. ice hockey team captured a silver medal at the Games, right behind Canada, which won the gold in the Olympic tournament.

Medal Designs

The medals, themselves, featured some unique designs, according to the International Olympic Committee:

"On the (front), the Olympic rings (are) marked in relief accompanied by Aboriginal designs taken from the orca work produced by laser and giving the impression of additional texture. On the reverse, (are) the official name of the Games in English and French, the two official languages of Canada and the Olympic Movement. Also present are the 2010 Olympic Winter Games emblem and the name of the sport and event concerned."

Additionally, for the first time in Olympic history, every single medal had a "unique design," according to Reuters. "No two medals are alike," Omer Arbel, a Vancouver artist who co-designed the medals, told the news agency. "Because the story of each athlete is completely unique, we felt each athlete (should) take home a different medal," 

The Medal Counts

The medal results in the table below are sorted by ranking, country, followed by the numbers of gold, silver, and bronze each country won, followed by the total number of medals.

        Ranking

        Country

            Medals

  (Gold, Silver, Bronze)

     Total

    Medals

1.

 United States

 (9, 15, 13)

 37

2.

 Germany

 (10, 13, 7)

 30

3.

 Canada

 (14, 7, 5)

 26

4.

 Norway

 (9, 8, 6)

 23

5.

 Austria

 (4, 6, 6)

 16

6.

 Russian Federation

 (3, 5, 7)

 15

7.

 Korea

 (6, 6, 2)

 14

8.

 China

 (5, 2, 4)

 11

8.

 Sweden

 (5, 2, 4)

 11

8.

 France

 (2, 3, 6)

 11

11.

 Switzerland

 (6, 0, 3)

 9

12.

 Netherlands

 (4, 1, 3)

 8

13.

 Czech Republic

 (2, 0, 4)

 6

13.

 Poland

 (1, 3, 2)

 6

15.

 Italy

 (1, 1, 3)

 5

15.

 Japan

 (0, 3, 2)

 5

15.

 Finland

 (0, 1, 4)

 5

18.

 Australia

 (2, 1, 0)

 3

18.

 Belarus

 (1, 1, 1)

 3

18.

 Slovakia

 (1, 1, 1)

 3

18.

 Croatia

 (0, 2, 1)

 3

18.

 Slovenia

 (0, 2, 1)

 3

23.

 Latvia

 (0, 2, 0)

 2

24.

 Great Britain

 (1, 0, 0)

 1

24.

 Estonia

 (0, 1, 0)

 1

24.

 Kazakhstan

 (0, 1, 0)

 1