A Gallery of Unusual Thanksgiving Day Inventions

01
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Inflation Eve - The Night Before Thanksgiving

A detailed view of one of the balloons before being inflated during 'Inflation Eve'
A detailed view of one of the balloons before being inflated during 'Inflation Eve'. Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

On the fourth Thursday in November, Americans celebrate a Thanksgiving tradition, that originated with the Pilgrims. As early as 1621, the puritan colonists of Plymouth, Massachusetts set aside a day of thanks for a bountiful harvest. Throughout the colonial period and into the nineteenth century, official days of feasting and fasting commemorated periods of good and poor fortune. Although early Thanksgiving days were spontaneous celebrations, by the mid-nineteenth century an annual fall Thanksgiving meal was customary throughout much of the nation. On October 3, 1863, in the wake of victory at Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln decided to issue a Thanksgiving Proclamation that declared the last Thursday in November national Thanksgiving Day. It was in 1941 that Congress fixed the Thanksgiving holiday as the fourth Thursday in November.

A detailed view of one of the balloons before being inflated during 'Inflation Eve', the preparations on November 25, 2009 for the Macy's 83rd Annual Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City. New giant helium character balloons include Pillsbury Doughboy, Ronald McDonald, Sailor Mickey and Spider-Man.

02
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Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Volunteers help inflate the Energizer Bunny flotation for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade
Volunteers help inflate the Energizer Bunny flotation for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 23, 2011 on West 77th Street in New York City. The parade started in 1924. Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images
03
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Giant Floats Are Readied

Sandbags & netting hold down the 'Sailor Mickey Mouse' flotation during preparation for parade
Sandbags and netting hold down the 'Sailor Mickey Mouse' flotation during preparation for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 23, 2011 on West 77th Street in New York City. The parade started in 1924. Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images
04
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The Pillsbury Doughboy at Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

The Pillsbury Doughboy balloon
The Pillsbury Doughboy balloon is prepared to make way through NYC streets during the 85th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 24, 2011 in New York City. Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images
05
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SpongeBob SquarePants at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

The SpongeBob SquarePants balloon
The SpongeBob SquarePants balloon makes its way through NYC streets during the 85th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 24, 2011 in New York City. Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Nickelodeon
06
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Spiderman at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

The Spiderman balloon makes its way through the streets
The Spiderman balloon makes its way through the streets during the 84th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 25, 2010 in New York City. Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images
07
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Po from Kung Fu Panda

Po from Nickelodeon's Kung Fu Panda
Po from Nickelodeon's Kung Fu Panda: The Series floats down Broadway for the 84th annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 25, 2010 in New York City. Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for Nickelodeon
08
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First Thanksgiving

First Thanksgiving
Painting by Jean Louis Gerome Ferris First Thanksgiving. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

As early as 1621, the puritan colonists of Plymouth, Massachusetts set aside a day of thanks for a bountiful harvest.

09
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A Proclamation For a Publick Thanksgiving,

A Proclamation For a Publick Thanksgiving,
1721 A Proclamation For a Publick Thanksgiving. LOC 1721

By the Honourable Gurdon Saltonstall, Esq; Governour of His Majesty's Colony of Connecticut in New-England 1721.

10
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Thanksgiving Proclamation by President Abraham Lincoln

Thanksgiving Proclamation
1863 Thanksgiving Proclamation. Abraham Lincoln

On October 3, 1863, in the wake of victory at Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln decided to issue a Thanksgiving Proclamation that declared the last Thursday in November national Thanksgiving Day.

11
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Thanksgiving embossed insert for baking pan

Thanksgiving embossed insert for baking pan
D527,217 Thanksgiving embossed insert for baking pan. USPTO

CLAIM The ornamental design for a thanksgiving embossed insert for baking pan, as shown and described.

12
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Year-round decorative lights with selectable holiday color schemes

Year-round decorative lights with selectable holiday color schemes
7,102,301 Year-round decorative lights with selectable holiday color schemes. USPTO

Turn it to the turkey for Thanksgiving

Patent Abstract: A decorative light strand has user-selectable color schemes corresponding to each holiday for year-round use. The light strand has a plurality of differently colored lights; a decorating selector comprising a switch which provides a plurality of user-selectable settings; and logic coupled to the switch and the plurality of differently colored lights to provide different holiday color schemes in response to the user-selectable settings. In one specific example, the light strand includes a plurality of red lights, a plurality of white lights, a plurality of blue lights, a plurality of green lights, a plurality of orange lights, and a plurality of yellow lights. A decorating selector on one end of the light strand has a plurality of decorative holiday settings which include a New Year's holiday setting which enables the plurality of white lights; a Valentines/Sweetest Day holiday setting which enables the pluralities of red and white lights; an Independence/Memorial Day holiday setting which enables the pluralities of red, white, and blue lights; a Halloween holiday setting which enables the pluralities of orange and yellow lights; a Thanksgiving holiday setting which enables the plurality of orange and green lights; a Christmas holiday setting which enables the pluralities of red and green lights; and a Hanukkah holiday setting which enables the pluralities of blue and yellow lights. Advantageously, this light strand may be hung permanently and utilized year-round for major U.S. holidays and other suitable occasions.