Acupressure Treasures: Hui Yin - Ren 1

To nourish Hui Yin via acupressure, we sit on our own hand, like a hen sitting on an egg
To nourish Hui Yin via acupressure, we sit on our own hand, like a hen sitting on an egg.

Hui Yin - A Convergence Of Yin

At the very root of the torso, at the center of the pelvic floor, a half-inch in front of the anus, lies Hui Yin, the first point on the Ren Mai (aka Conception Vessel). The English translation of Hui Yin is “Meeting Of Yin” or “Convergence Of Yin.” The point is also occasionally rendered as “Seabed.”

Simply in virtue of its location (as the lowest most point), Hui Yin is considered the most “yin” point of the human torso.

Metaphorically, it’s like the floor of the ocean. It’s also the meeting-place of three important extraordinary meridians: the Ren (aka Conception), Du (aka Governing) and Chong (aka Penetrating) Mai.

As an acupuncture point, its traditional indications include a variety of physical imbalances related to the lower abdominal region: vaginitis, retention of urine, nocturnal emissions, hemorrhoids, enuresis and irregular menstruation. Interestingly, Hui Yin is also used to alleviate mental disorders (aka “shen disturbances”).

In certain Taoist sexual practices, Hui Yin is utilized to prevent ejaculation, and instead, redirect and reabsorb the activated sexual energy back into the energetic matrix of the (male) practitioner’s bodymind. (Best to attempt such techniques only with the guidance of a qualified teacher).

Qigong Acupressure Practice To Wake Up Hui Yin

One way to activate and balance Hui Yin is first to wake up the Lao Gong point, in the center of the palms -- by using acupressure or simply rubbing the palms of the hands together, until they feel warm.

Then, seated either upright in a chair, or cross-legged on the floor, slip one of your hands (right hand for women, and left hand for men, is how it’s traditionally taught), palm facing upward, between your legs and all the way under the base of your torso, so that you’re basically sitting right on top of the palm of that hand, like a hen sitting on an egg.

The idea is to bring the Lao Gong point in the palm of your hand into more-or-less direct contact with the Hui Yin point on the pelvic floor -- or at least bring them into close proximity. Then, imagine/feel the energy from Lao Gong -- like an egg-shaped sphere of golden-white light -- radiating upward, waking up, and deeply nourishing Hui Yin.

Next, feel and/or imagine that energy flowing upward, from Hui Yin, as nourishment for the lower dantian and snow mountain energetic centers, deep within the abdomen, in front of the tailbone and sacrum. Feel this gently circulating energy also as nourishment for the physical reproductive organs -- an important aspect of the Kidney Organ system.

Continue for two or three minutes, maintaining a gentle smile, which naturally releases tension in the face, neck, and jaw. To complete the practice, rest your hands, palms down, on the top of your thighs, noticing the fullness of energy in Hui Yin and the lower dantian. Then draw your mental focus up into the heart center, for a couple of breaths; and then into the crystal palace -- the space in the center of the head, directly back from the “third eye” point. Feel the connection between the three dantians: the lower dantian in the abdomen, the middle dantian in the heart center, and the upper dantian in the head.

Optional: continue from this point to the practice of the Microcosmic Orbit.

Format
mla apa chicago
Your Citation
Reninger, Elizabeth. "Acupressure Treasures: Hui Yin - Ren 1." ThoughtCo, Apr. 24, 2017, thoughtco.com/acupressure-treasures-hui-yin-ren-1-3182278. Reninger, Elizabeth. (2017, April 24). Acupressure Treasures: Hui Yin - Ren 1. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/acupressure-treasures-hui-yin-ren-1-3182278 Reninger, Elizabeth. "Acupressure Treasures: Hui Yin - Ren 1." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/acupressure-treasures-hui-yin-ren-1-3182278 (accessed November 20, 2017).