Adderall Facts

Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine Information

Amphetamine is 1-phenylpropan-2-amine.
Chesnok, Wikipedia Commons

What Is Adderall?

Adderall is an amphetamine, which is a type of stimulant. The active ingredient is a mix of amphetamines and dextroamphetamines: racemic amphetamine aspartate monohydrate, racemic amphetamine sulfate, dextroamphetamine saccharide, and dextroamphetamine sulfate. The amphetamine and dextroamphetamine lead to increased levels of the neurotransmitters norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain.
Adderall is highly addictive.

Why Is Adderall Used?

Adderall is commonly prescribed for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. Because it suppresses the appetite and stimulates the metabolism, it is also used for weight loss. Adderall, like other amphetamines, also increases cognitive performance and stimulates libido. Others take Adderall for the high it can produce.

How Is Adderall Taken?

Adderall is prescribed as a tablet or capsule, but it can be taken in any of a number of ways, including injection, smoking, or snorting.

Overdose Symptoms

Addiction and overdose can lead to several symptoms:
  • confusion
  • panic attacks
  • tremors
  • extremely high fever
  • Tourette's syndrome
  • sudden cardiac event
  • death
Once the "high" wears off, depression and extreme fatigue may result. Nausea, vomiting and blood pressure changes may occur as a result of taking too much Adderall. Adderall is addictive, but most of the effects of withdrawal tend to be psychological.
One of the reasons Adderall and other amphetamines aren't often prescribed for weight loss is because most people gain weight once they discontinue taking the stimulant.

Street Names for Adderall

zing
study buddies
smart pills