Advanced Level Sentence Transformations Practice

Sentence Transformations Quiz 2

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Sentence transformation exercises help you expand your usage skills through testing various ways of stating the same idea.

For example:

I've lived here since 2002. -> I moved here in 2002.

The ability to rewrite sentences so that they have the same meaning as the original is often required for many English exams such as Cambridge's First Certificate, CAE and Proficiency. This skill can also help you prepare for the TOEFL examination (Test of English as a Foreign Language).

It is also an important skill which can help you improve your understanding of similar English expressions and vocabulary.

Sentence Transformation Quiz

1. Katherine keeps making long distance telephone calls. 
Katherine is ____________

2. Jack ate lunch before we arrived.
By the time ____________

3. Is there such a thing as happiness?
Does ____________

4. I haven't eaten Sushi for years.
It's ____________

5. I didn't know about Susan's divorce.
I didn't know that ____________

6. His homework won't have been finished by the end of the day.
He won't ____________

7. His education is none of your business.
His education does ____________

8. He'll be at the meeting soon.
It won't be long ____________

9. Go to the conference check-in desk immediately on arrival.
As ____________

10. After finishing the exam, I started to relax a lot.
Since ____________

Answers

1. Katherine keeps making long distance telephone calls.


Answer: Katherine is always making long distance telephone calls.

Use the present continuous with 'always' or 'constantly' to express behavior that annoys you. This form is often used to complain about another person's behavior. 

Jack ate lunch before we arrived.
Answer: By the time we arrived, Jack had eaten lunch.

Use the past perfect to express an action that happens before another time in the past. The past perfect is often used to provide a reason for why something did or did not happen.

Is there such a thing as happiness?
Does happiness exist?

Use the verb 'exist' to ask whether something 'is' or 'is not'. 'Exist' is often used with question words to find explanations. 

I haven't eaten Sushi for years.
It's years since I ate Sushi.

The informal phrase 'it's years since' is used to express that idea that has long time has passed since someone last did something. The phrase functions similarly to the present perfect and is an exception to the rule. 

I didn't know about Susan's divorce.
I didn't know that Susan had divorced.

You can often express the same idea by using a different word form. In this case, the noun and the verb both take the same form 'divorce'. 

His homework won't have been finished by the end of the day.
He won't have finished his homework by the end of the day.

The future perfect expresses an action that will have been completed by some point in the future. In this case, the original sentence employes the passive form and the answer the active form of the verb. 

His education is none of your business.


His education does not concern you.

The verb 'concern' is used as a synonym to the more informal 'to be someone's business'. In this case, 'none' is replaced the the negative form of the verb. 

He'll be at the meeting soon.
It won't be long before he's at the meeting.

The phrase 'it won't be long' is used to say that something will occur soon.

Go to the conference check-in desk immediately on arrival.
As soon as you arrive, go to the conference check.

The time expression 'as soon as' conveys the idea of something that happens immediately after something else is done. 

After finishing the exam, I started to relax a lot.
Since finishing the exam, I have relaxed a lot.

'Since' can also be used as a preposition meaning from that time onwards. Use the present perfect with 'since'.