'The Adventure of the Speckled Band' Quotes

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - Collected Works "The Adventure of Speckled Band" is a locked-room mystery, a story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The short story was published in Strand Magazine in February 1892, with illustrations by Sidney Paget.

Quotes

  • "She raised her veil as she spoke, and we could see that she was indeed in a pitiable state of agitation, her face all drawn and grey, with restless, frightened eyes, like those of some hunted animal." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 1

  • "The very horror of my situation lies in the fact that my fears are so vague, and my suspicions depend so entirely upon small points, which might seem trivial to another, that even he to whom of all others I have a right to look for help and advice looks upon all that I tell him about it as the fancies of a nervous woman." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 1

  • "But I have heard, Mr. Holmes, that you can see deeply into the manifold wickedness of the human heart. You may advise me how to walk amid the dangers which encompass me." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 1

  • "Violence of temper approaching to mania has been hereditary in the men of the family, and in my stepfather's case it had, I believe, been intensified by his long residence in the tropics." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 2

  • "Pray be precise as to details..." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 2

  • "I could not sleep that night. A vague feeling of impending misfortune impressed me. My sister and I, you will recollect, were twins, and you know how subtle are the links which bind two souls which are so closely allied." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 2

  • "Oh, my God! Helen! It was the band! The speckled band!" - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 3

  • "Sometimes I have thought that it was merely the wild talk of delirium, sometimes that it may have referred to some band of people, perhaps to these very gypsies in the plantation. I do not know whether the spotted handkerchiefs which so many of them wear over their heads might have suggested the strange adjective which she used." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 3

  • "A large face, seared with a thousand wrinkles, burned yellow with the sun, and marked with every evil passion, was turned from one to the other of us, while his deep-set, bile-shot eyes, and his high thin fleshless nose, gave him somewhat the resemblance to a fierce old bird of prey." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 4

  • "Ha! You put me off, do you? ... I know you, you scoundrel! I have heard of you before. You are Holmes the meddler." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 4

  • "He must guard himself, for he may find that there is someone more cunning than himself upon his track." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 5

  • "For example, what a fool a builder must be to open a ventilator into another room, when, with the same trouble, he might have communicated with the outside air!" - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 5

  • "Goodbye, and be brave, for if you will do what I have told you, you may rest assured that we shall soon drive away the dangers that threaten you." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 6

  • "You speak of danger. You have evidently seen more in these rooms than was visible to me." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 6

  • "How shall I ever forget that dreadful vigil? I cold not hear a sound, not even the drawing of a breath, and yet I knew that my companion sat open-eyed, within a few feet of me, in the same state of nervous tension in which I was myself." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 7

  • "They say that away down in the village, and even in the distant parsonage, that cry raised the sleepers from their beds. It struck cold to our hearts, and I stood gazing at Holmes, and he at me, until the last echoes of it had died away into the silence from which it rose." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 7

  • "I had ... come to an entirely erroneous conclusion, which shows, my dear Watson, how dangerous it always is to reason from insufficient data." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 8

  • "Some of the blows of my cane came home, and roused its snakish temper, so that it flew upon the first person it saw. In this way I am no doubt indirectly responsible for Dr. Grimesby Roylott's death, and I cannot say that it is likely to weigh very heavily upon my conscience." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of Speckled Band," Section 8