Aisle, I'll, and Isle: Commonly Confused Words

First Sight
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The words aisle, I'll, and isle are homophones: they sound similar but have different meanings. Learn how to discern which one to use.

Definitions of Aisle, I'll, and Isle

The noun aisle refers to a passageway or to a part of a church divided from the nave.

I'll is the contracted form of I will or I shall.

The noun isle refers to an island or a peninsula, especially a small one.

Examples

  • "Then, in measured step, teetering a little on very high heels, the bridesmaids began to walk down the aisle." (Rona Jaffe)
  • "In the mountains I'll give you a sign. I'll show you my power. I'll show you what happens to those who would set themselves against me. Wait. Watch."
    (Stephen King, The Stand, 1978)
  • Elsa descended the stone stairs, climbed into her boat, and rowed back to the isle.

Practice Exercises

Test your knowledge by filling in the proper word for each sentence. 

(a) Meg slid past her parents, hurried up the _____, and disappeared through the wide doorway.

(b) I spoke to a strange man who lives alone on an _____ in the bay.

(c) This may turn into a long letter, but _____ try my best to be brief.

Answers to Practice Exercises

(a) Meg slid past her parents, hurried up the aisle, and disappeared through the wide doorway.

(b) I spoke to a strange man who lives alone on an isle in the bay.

(c) This may turn into a long letter, but I'll try my best to be brief.

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Your Citation
Nordquist, Richard. "Aisle, I'll, and Isle: Commonly Confused Words." ThoughtCo, Oct. 11, 2017, thoughtco.com/aisle-ill-and-isle-1689295. Nordquist, Richard. (2017, October 11). Aisle, I'll, and Isle: Commonly Confused Words. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/aisle-ill-and-isle-1689295 Nordquist, Richard. "Aisle, I'll, and Isle: Commonly Confused Words." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/aisle-ill-and-isle-1689295 (accessed January 23, 2018).