American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915

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Esaak, Shelley. "American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915." ThoughtCo, Feb. 22, 2017, thoughtco.com/american-stories-paintings-of-everyday-life-4122658. Esaak, Shelley. (2017, February 22). American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/american-stories-paintings-of-everyday-life-4122658 Esaak, Shelley. "American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/american-stories-paintings-of-everyday-life-4122658 (accessed October 17, 2017).
01
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Paul Revere, 1768

Photograph © 2009 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; used with permission
John Singleton Copley (American, 1738-1815) John Singleton Copley (American, 1738-1815). Paul Revere, 1768. Oil on canvas. 35 1/8 x 28 1/2 in. (89.2 x 72.4 cm). Gift of Joseph W. Revere, William B. Revere, and Edward H. R. Revere. (30.781). Museum of Fine Arts Boston / Photograph © 2009 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Traveling October 12, 2009-May 23, 2010 to New York and Los Angeles


In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled venues for American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 are The Metropolitan Museum of Art (October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010) and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (February 28-May 23, 2010).

John Singleton Copley painted this portrait of his friend, Paul Revere (1734/35-1818), a full seven years before the Bostonian silversmith embarked upon his legendary "midnight ride" and five years before he participated in the Boston Tea Party. Additionally, Revere's thriving business at the time centered more on small items like spoons, chains and lockets, and much less on pricey tea services. Why, then, the teapot in this painting?

Well, two things. First, Paul Revere--this craftsman of the first water--could produce elaborate works of silver, and Copley is letting us (and potential, contemporary patrons) know this. However, Paul Revere was also a member of the highly treasonous, secret society called the Sons of Liberty and, just one year before this painting, had, along with most of the rest of inhabitants of the Thirteen Colonies, boycotted tea after Parliament passed the Townshend Revenue Act of 1767 which taxed tea sales from here to breakfast. (Americans are tolerant to a fault of taxes, but never less so than when caffeine is involved.)

Mr. Copley and Mr. Revere have conspired here to leave us to decide: skilled craftsman? Future patriot? Or both?
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

02
of 33

Watson and the Shark, 1778

Image © Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; used with permission
John Singleton Copley (American, 1738-1815) John Singleton Copley (American, 1738-1815). Watson and the Shark, 1778. Oil on canvas. 71 3/4 x 90 1/2 in. (182.2 x 229.9 cm). Ferdinand Belin Fund. (1963.6.1). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Image © Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


This famous painting fits into the framework "American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life" rather loosely. Copley was, of course, American, but was living in England at this point. The subject of Watson and the Shark was Sir Brook Watson (1735-1807), a wealthy London merchant and staunch Royalist who had survived (minus his lower right leg) a shark attack while swimming in Havana harbor at the age of 14. The crew depicted in the dinghy may have had Americans in its midst, as the merchant ship from which it was launched hailed from Boston. Basically, though, we're here seeing an American artist's painting of one very extraordinary scene from the everyday life of a British citizen as it took place in the West Indies, 29 years after the event occurred.
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

03
of 33

The Exhumation of the Mastodon, 1805-08

Courtesy of the Maryland Historical Society; used with permission
Charles Willson Peale (American, 1741-1827) Charles Willson Peale (American, 1741-1827). The Exhumation of the Mastodon, 1805-08. Oil on canvas. 50 x 62 1/2 in. (127 x 158.8 cm). (BCLM-MA.5911). Courtesy of the Maryland Historical Society

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

04
of 33

The Artist in His Museum, 1822

Image © Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; used with permission
Charles Willson Peale (American, 1741-1827) Charles Willson Peale (American, 1741-1827). The Artist in His Museum, 1822. Oil on canvas. 103 3/4 x 79 7/8 in. (263.5 x 202.9 cm). The Joseph Harrison Jr. Collection, Gift of Mrs. Sarah Harrison. (1878.1.2). Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Image © Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia


Note: The Artist in His Museum will only be shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It will not travel for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art showing of American Stories.
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

05
of 33

Gallery of the Louvre, 1831-33

© Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago/Art Resource, NY; used with permission
Samuel F. B. Morse (American, 1791-1872) Samuel F. B. Morse (American, 1791-1872). Gallery of the Louvre, 1831-33. Oil on canvas. 73 3/4 x 108 in. (187.3 x 274.3 cm). Daniel J. Terra Collection. (1992.51). Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago. © Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago/Art Resource, NY

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

06
of 33

The Image Pedlar, 1844

Photo © The New York Historical Society; used with permission
Francis William Edmonds (American, 1806-1863) Francis William Edmonds (American, 1806-1863). The Image Pedlar, 1844. Oil on canvas. 33 1/4 x 42 1/4 in. (84.5 x 107.3 cm). Gift of the New York Gallery of Fine Arts, 1858. (1858.71). The New York Historical Society. Photo © The New York Historical Society

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

07
of 33

Fur Traders Descending the Missouri, 1845

Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; used with permission
George Caleb Bingham (American, 1811-1879) George Caleb Bingham (American, 1811-1879). Fur Traders Descending the Missouri, 1845. Oil on canvas. 29 x 36 1/2 in. (73.7 x 92.7 cm). Morris K. Jesup Fund, 1933. (33.61). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

08
of 33

Eel Spearing at Setauket, 1845

© Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York; used with permission
William Sidney Mount (American, 1807-1868) William Sidney Mount (American, 1807-1868). Eel Spearing at Setauket, 1845. Oil on canvas. 28 1/2 x 36 in. (72.4 x 91.4 cm). (N-395.55). Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York. © Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

09
of 33

The Jolly Flatboatmen, 1846

Image © Manoogian Collection; used with permission
George Caleb Bingham (American, 1811-1879) George Caleb Bingham (American, 1811-1879). The Jolly Flatboatmen, 1846. Oil on canvas. 38 1/8 x 48 1/2 in. (96.8 x 123.2 cm). Manoogian Collection. Image © Manoogian Collection

About the Show:


In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

10
of 33

The Power of Music, 1847

© The Cleveland Museum of Art; used with permission
William Sidney Mount (American, 1807-1868) William Sidney Mount (American, 1807-1868). The Power of Music, 1847. Oil on canvas. 17 1/8 x 21 1/8 in. (43.4 x 53.5 cm). Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Fund. (1991.110). The Cleveland Museum of Art. © The Cleveland Museum of Art

About the Show:


In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

11
of 33

War News from Mexico, 1848

Photo © Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art; used with permission
Richard Caton Woodville (American, 1825-1855) Richard Caton Woodville (American, 1825-1855). War News from Mexico, 1848. Oil on canvas. 27 x 25 in. (68.6 x 63.5 cm). Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. Photo © Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

12
of 33

Advice on the Prairie, 1853

Photo © the Buffalo Bill Historical Center; used with permission
William Tylee Ranney (American, 1813-1857) William Tylee Ranney (American, 1813-1857). Advice on the Prairie, 1853. Oil on canvas. 40 x 54 in. (101.6 x 137.2 cm). Gift of Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran. Whitney Gallery of Western Art, Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, Wyoming. Photo © the Buffalo Bill Historical Center

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

13
of 33

Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses, 1856

Photo © the Brooklyn Museum; used with permission
Lilly Martin Spencer (American, 1822-1902) Lilly Martin Spencer (American, 1822-1902). Kiss Me and You'll Kiss the 'Lasses, 1856. Oil on canvas. 26 1/2 x 22 1/4 in. (67.3 x 56.5 cm). Gift of Gwendolyn O. L. Conkling. (40.60). Brooklyn Museum, New York. Photo © the Brooklyn Museum

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

14
of 33

The Life of a Hunter: A Tight Fix, 1856

Photo © Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art; used with permission
Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait (American, 1819-1905) Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait (American, 1819-1905). The Life of a Hunter: A Tight Fix, 1856. Oil on canvas. 40 x 60 in. (101.6 x 152.4 cm). Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. Photo © Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."
 

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010
 

15
of 33

Old Kentucky Home (Negro Life at the South), 1859

Collection of The New York Historical Society; used with permission
Eastman Johnson (American, 1824-1906) Eastman Johnson (American, 1824-1906). Old Kentucky Home (Negro Life at the South), 1859. Oil on canvas. 36 x 45 1/4 in. (91.4 x 114.9 cm). The Robert L. Stuart Collection. (S-225). Collection of The New York Historical Society, on permanent loan from The New York Public Library

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

16
of 33

Pitching Quoits, 1865

© President and Fellows of Harvard College; used with permission
Winslow Homer (American, 1836-1910) Winslow Homer (American, 1836-1910). Pitching Quoits, 1865. Oil on canvas. 26 3/4 x 53 3/4 in. (68 x 136.5 cm). Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Haines Curtiss. (1940.298). Harvard University Art Museums, Fogg Art Museum. © President and Fellows of Harvard College / Photograph by Katya Kallsen


Note: Pitching Quoits will only be shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It will not travel for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art showing of American Stories.
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

17
of 33

Interior with Portraits, ca. 1865

Image © the Smithsonian American Art Museum; used with permission
Thomas Le Clear (American, 1818-1882) Thomas Le Clear (American, 1818-1882). Interior with Portraits, ca. 1865. Oil on canvas. 25 7/8 x 40 1/2 in. (65.7 x 102.9 cm). Museum purchase made possible by the Pauline Edwards Bequest. (1993.6). Smithsonian American Art Museum. Image © the Smithsonian American Art Museum

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

18
of 33

Making a Train, 1867

Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art; used with permission
Seymour Joseph Guy (American, 1824-1910) Seymour Joseph Guy (American, 1824-1910). Making a Train, 1867. Oil on canvas. 18 1/8 x 24 1/8 in. (46 x 61.3 cm). The George W. Elkins Collection, 1924. (E1924-4-14). Philadelphia Museum of Art. Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art / Photograph by Graydon Wood


Note: Making a Train will only be shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It will not travel for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art showing of American Stories.
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

19
of 33

Breezing Up (A Fair Wind), 1876

Image © Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; used with permission
Winslow Homer (American, 1836-1910) Winslow Homer (American, 1836-1910). Breezing Up (A Fair Wind), 1876. Oil on canvas. 24 3/16 x 38 3/16 in. (61.4 x 97 cm). Gift of the W. L. and May T. Mellon Foundation. (1943.13.1). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Image © Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

20
of 33

Dressing for the Carnival, 1877

Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; used with permission
Winslow Homer (American, 1836-1910) Winslow Homer (American, 1836-1910). Dressing for the Carnival, 1877. Oil on canvas. 20 x 30 in. (50.8 x 76.2 cm). Amelia B. Lazarus Fund, 1922. (22.220). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


Note: Dressing for the Carnival will only be shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It will not travel for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art showing of American Stories.
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

21
of 33

Mother About to Wash Her Sleepy Child, 1880

© 2009 Museum Associates / Los Angeles County Museum of Art; used with permission
Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926) Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926). Mother About to Wash Her Sleepy Child, 1880. Oil on canvas. 39 7/16 x 25 7/8 in. (100.3 x 65.8 cm). Mrs. Fred Hathaway Bixby Bequest. Los Angeles County Museum of Art. © 2009 Museum Associates / Los Angeles County Museum of Art


Note: Mother About to Wash Her Sleepy Child will only be shown at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It will not travel for The Metropolitan Museum of Art showing of American Stories.
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

22
of 33

The Card Trick, 1880-89

Photo © The Joslyn Art Museum; used with permission
John George Brown (American, 1831-1913) John George Brown (American, 1831-1913). The Card Trick, 1880-89. Oil on canvas mounted on panel. 26 x 31 in. (66 x 78.7 cm). Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska. Photo © The Joslyn Art Museum

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

23
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A Street in Venice, ca. 1880-82

© Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute; used with permission
John Singer Sargent (American, 1856-1925) John Singer Sargent (American, 1856-1925). A Street in Venice, ca. 1880-82. Oil on canvas. 29 5/8 x 20 5/8 in. (75.1 x 52.4 cm). (1955.575). Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts. © Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

24
of 33

A Woman and a Girl Driving, 1881

Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art; used with permission
Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926) Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926). A Woman and a Girl Driving, 1881. Oil on canvas. 35 1/4 x 51 3/8 in. (89.7 x 130.5 cm). Purchased with the W. P. Wilstach Fund, 1921. (W1921-1-1). Philadelphia Museum of Art. Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art / Photograph by Graydon Wood


Note: A Woman and a Girl Driving will only be shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It will not travel for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art showing of American Stories.
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

25
of 33

Swimming, 1885

Image © Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; used with permission
Thomas Eakins (American, 1844-1916) Thomas Eakins (American, 1844-1916). Swimming, 1885. Oil on canvas. 27 3/8 x 36 3/8 in. (69.5 x 92.4 cm). (1990.19.1). Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas. Image © Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas


Purchased by the Friends of Art, Fort Worth Art Association, 1925; acquired by the Amon Carter Museum, 1990, from the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth through grants and donations from the Amon G. Carter Foundation, the Sid W. Richardson Foundation, the Anne Burnett and Charles Tandy Foundation, Capital Cities/ABC Foundation, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, The R. D. and Joan Dale Hubbard Foundation and the people of Fort Worth.

Note: Swimming will only be shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It will not travel for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art showing of American Stories.
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

26
of 33

Idle Hours, ca. 1894

Image © Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; used with permission
William Merritt Chase (American, 1849-1916) William Merritt Chase (American, 1849-1916). Idle Hours, ca. 1894. Oil on canvas. 39 x 48 5/8 in. (99.1 x 123.5 cm). (1982.1). Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas. Image © Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas


Note: Idle Hours will only be shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It will not travel for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art showing of American Stories.
 

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

27
of 33

Ring Toss, 1896

Collection of Marie and Hugh Halff; used with permission
William Merritt Chase (American, 1849-1916) William Merritt Chase (American, 1849-1916). Ring Toss, 1896. Oil on canvas. 40 3/8 x 35 1/8 in. (102.6 x 89.2 cm). Collection of Marie and Hugh Halff

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

28
of 33

Fight for the Water Hole, 1903

Image © The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; used with permission
Frederic Remington (American, 1861-1909) Frederic Remington (American, 1861-1909). Fight for the Water Hole, 1903. Oil on canvas. 27 1/4 x 40 1/8 in. (69.2 x 102 cm). The Hogg Brothers Collection, gift of Miss Ima Hogg. (43.25). The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Image © The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

29
of 33

The Shoppers, 1907

© The Estate of William Glackens; used with permission
William James Glackens (American, 1870-1938) William James Glackens (American, 1870-1938). The Shoppers, 1907. Oil on canvas. 60 x 60 in. (152.4 x 152.4 cm). Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr. (71.651). Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virginia. © The Estate of William Glackens / Photo courtesy Kraushaar Galleries Inc., New York

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

30
of 33

Chinese Restaurant, 1909

© 2009 Delaware Art Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
John Sloan (American, 1871-1951) John Sloan (American, 1871-1951). Chinese Restaurant, 1909. Oil on canvas. 26 x 32 1/4 in. (66 x 81.9 cm). Marion Stratton Gould Fund. (51.12). Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester. © 2009 Delaware Art Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

31
of 33

The Breakfast, 1911

Photo courtesy of Ted Slavin; used with permission
William McGregor Paxton (American, 1869-1941) William McGregor Paxton (American, 1869-1941). The Breakfast, 1911. Oil on canvas. 28 1/4 x 35 1/4 in. (71.8 x 89.5 cm). Collection of Ted Slavin. Photo courtesy of Ted Slavin

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

32
of 33

Cliff Dwellers, 1913

Photograph © 2009 Museum Associates/LACMA; used with permission
George Bellows (American, 1882-1925) George Bellows (American, 1882-1925). Cliff Dwellers, 1913. Oil on canvas. 40 1/4 x 42 1/8 in. (102.1 x 106.8 cm). Los Angeles County Fund. (16.4). Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Photograph © 2009 Museum Associates/LACMA

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010

33
of 33

The Sketchers, 1914

© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; used with permission
John Singer Sargent (American, 1856-1925) John Singer Sargent (American, 1856-1925). The Sketchers, 1914. Oil on canvas. 22 x 28 in. (55.9 x 71.1 cm). The Arthur and Margaret Glasgow Fund. (58.11). Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts / Photo by Wen Hwa Ts'ao

About the Show:

In over 100 works, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915 illustrates the constantly changing ways in which inhabitants of what would become the United States of America viewed themselves from the decade before the Revolutionary War to just before World War I. Along the way, it also tells the story of how the role of American artist shifted from humbly-paid craftsman to highly-valued professional. The exhibition is arranged chronologically into four themes: "Inventing American Stories, 1765-1830," "Stories for the Public, 1830-1860," "Stories of War and Reconciliation, 1860-1877" and "Cosmopolitan and Candid Stories, 1877-1915."

Scheduled Venues:

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: October 12, 2009-January 24, 2010
Los Angeles County Museum of Art: February 28-May 23, 2010