'Baa, Baa, Black Sheep' Chords

Learning to Play Children's Songs on Guitar

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Note: if the chords and lyrics below appears poorly formatted, download this PDF of "Baa, Baa, Black Sheeo", which is both properly formatted for printing and ad-free.

Chords Used: C (x32010) | F (xx3211) | G (320003)

Baa, Baa, Black Sheep Chords

C
Baa, baa, black sheep,
F            C
Have you any wool?
F        C
Yes sir, yes sir,
G          C
Three bags full.
C           F
One for the master,
C           G
One for the dame,
C               F
And one for the little boy
    C              G
Who lives down the lane.


C
Baa, baa, black sheep,
F            C
Have you any wool?
F        C
Yes sir, yes sir,
G          C
Three bags full.

More: Children's Song Chords & Lyrics

'Baa, Baa, Black Sheep' Performance Tips

There are two potential strumming patterns to be used when playing "Baa, Baa, Black Sheep" - the first using slow down-strums, and the second using alternating down-up strums. Both are easy.

If you want to tackle the easiest strum first, simply strum your guitar four times for each "line" shown above. If there is only one chord shown on a line (for example the first line of the song has only a C major chord above it), strum that chord four times slowly in a downward motion. For lines in which there are two chords, strum each chord twice slowly in a downward motion.

For the slightly more complicated (although still really easy) strumming pattern, simply strum down then up for each downstrum in the previous version.

This means you'll play each line with only one chord eight times ("down up down up down up down up"). For lines which have two chords, you'll play each chord four times ("down up down up"). There are no tricks or variations throughout the song.

If you're having a hard time playing the F major chord above, try reading these hints on playing an F major chord.

A History of 'Baa, Baa, Black Sheep'

The song's lyrics are derived from an English nursery rhyme dating back to 1731. The melody is one used in many songs, most notably "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" and the "Alphabet song". The marriage of lyrics and melody was first published together in 1879 in Nursery Songs and Games.