Basalt Picture Gallery

01
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Massive Basalt

Basic black
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2008 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

Basalt is the most common volcanic rock, constituting nearly all of the oceanic crust and covering parts of the continents. This gallery presents some of basalt's variety, on land and in the ocean.

Pictures 1, 2, 10–13 and 15–17 are flood basalt; pictures 5, 8 and 9 are ocean island basalt; 3, 6, 7 and 14 are continental basalt; and 18 is an ophiolite basalt. Learn more about these in About Basalt.

More about basalt:
About Basalt
Free wallpaper image of basalt
More wallpaper images of basalt
Still more basalt wallpapers
Other volcanic rocks
Volcanism in a nutshell

Go see basalt:
Geology of California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Alaska and Hawaii
Visit Iceland

Submit your basalt photo

Solid basalt, with aphanitic texture, is typical of the great continental flood basalts. This was collected in northern Oregon.

02
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Fresh and Weathered Massive Basalt

Ensure a fresh face
Basalt Picture Gallery From California subduction transect stop 6. Photo (c) 2006 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

Basalt may contain the iron mineral magnetite as well as iron-rich pyroxene, which both weather into reddish stains. Expose fresh surfaces with a rock hammer.

03
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Altered Basalt with Palagonite Crust

A sign of steam weathering
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2011 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy

When basalt erupts into shallow water, abundant steam chemically alters the fresh glassy rock to palagonite. The typical rust-colored coating can be quite striking in outcrops.

04
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Vesiculated Basalt

Vesiculated means bubbly
Basalt Picture Gallery From California subduction transect stop 18. Photo (c) 2006 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

Much basalt has vesicular texture in which vesicles, or bubbles of gas (CO2, H2O or both) came out of solution as the magma slowly rose to the surface.

05
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Porphyritic Basalt

Porphyritic means full of crystals
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2006 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

This Hawaiian basalt contains vesicles and large grains (phenocrysts) of olivine. Rocks with phenocrysts are said to have porphyritic texture.

06
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Amygdaloidal Basalt

With filled-in vesicles
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2008 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy).

Vesicles that later become filled with new minerals are called amygdules. Outcrop from the Berkeley Hills, California.

07
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Basalt Flow Surface

Stretched by flow
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2008 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

Once the surface of a lava flow, this basalt specimen shows signs of stretching, tearing and flattening of vesicles while it was still soft lava.

08
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Pahoehoe and Aa Basalt

One recipe, two outcomes
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo courtesy jtu of Flickr under Creative Commons license.

Both of these basalt flows have the same composition, but while they were molten, the smooth pahoehoe lava was hotter than the jagged aa lava. (more below)

Click the photo for the full-size version. This lava flow displays two textures of lava that have the same composition. The ragged, clinkery form on the left is called aa (or in more proper Hawaiian spelling, ‘a‘a). You pronounce it "ah-ah." Perhaps it has that name because the rough surface of the solidified lava can quickly cut your feet to ribbons, even with heavy boots. In Iceland, this kind of lava is called apalhraun.

The lava on the right is shiny and smooth, and it has its own name, like aa a Hawaiian word—pahoehoe. In Iceland, this kind of lava is called helluhraun. Smooth is a relative term—some forms of pahoehoe can have a surface as wrinkled as an elephant's trunk, but not at all jagged like aa.

What makes the exact same lava produce two different textures, pahoehoe and aa, is the difference in the way they have flowed. Fresh basalt lava is almost always smooth, liquid pahoehoe, but as it cools and crystallizes it turns sticky—that is, more viscous. At some point the surface can't stretch quickly enough to keep up with the movement of the flow's interior, and it breaks and shreds like the crust of a loaf of bread. This can happen simply from the lava growing cooler, or it can occur as the flow spills down a steep place making it stretch faster.

The next photo in the gallery shows a vertical cross section of aa lava. See a closeup of pahoehoe here.

For photos of related rocks, see the volcanic rocks gallery.

09
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Profile of Aa Basalt Flow

See how it's done
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo courtesy Ron Schott of Flickr under Creative Commons license.

Basalt at the top of this lava flow ripped apart into aa while hotter rock below continued to flow smoothly.

10
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Hexagonal Jointing in Basalt

Six-sided chunk
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2008 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

As thick flows of basalt cool, they tend to shrink and crack apart into columns with six sides, although five- and seven-sided ones also occur.

11
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Columnar Jointing in Basalt

Cracked in all directions
Basalt Picture Gallery. U.S. Geological Survey photo by S. R. Brantley.

The joints (cracks with no displacement) in this thick basalt flow at Yellowstone form well-developed columns. See other examples from Wyoming and Oregon.

12
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Columnar Basalt in Eugene, Oregon

An urban basalt vehicle
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2005 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

Skinner Butte is a spectacular example of columnar-jointed basalt, popular among Eugene's urban climbers. (click full size)

13
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Superimposed Basalt Flows

Note the preserved surfaces
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2005 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

A roadcut north of Maupin, Oregon shows several basalt flows stacked upon earlier ones. They may be separated by thousands of years. (click full size)

14
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Basalt at Fossil Falls, California

Framed by a Sierra sunset
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2008 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

Fossil Falls State Park preserves an ancient riverbed where flowing water once sculpted the vesicular basalt into bizarre shapes.

15
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Columbia River Basalt in California

Thick series of ancient flows
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2005 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

The Columbia River basalt plateau is Earth's youngest example of a continental flood basalt. Its south end, in California, is exposed here on the Pit River.

16
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Columbia River Basalt in Washington

A lava rampart
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2005 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

The Columbia River basalt in Washington, across the Columbia River from The Dalles, Oregon, last erupted about 15 million years ago. (click full size)

17
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Columbia River Basalt in Oregon

A grand escarpment
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2005 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy).

Tectonic activity in southern Oregon broke apart the gigantic lava plateau into ranges (like Abert Rim) and basins. See more photos from this region.

18
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Pillow Basalt, Stark's Knob, New York

Ordovician or modern, it's always the same
Basalt Picture Gallery. Photo (c) 2008 Andrew Alden, licensed to About.com ( fair use policy)

Basalt erupting under water swiftly solidifies into pillow lava or lava pillows. The oceanic crust is largely composed of pillow lava. See more pillow lava

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Your Citation
Alden, Andrew. "Basalt Picture Gallery." ThoughtCo, Jan. 13, 2017, thoughtco.com/basalt-picture-gallery-4122689. Alden, Andrew. (2017, January 13). Basalt Picture Gallery. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/basalt-picture-gallery-4122689 Alden, Andrew. "Basalt Picture Gallery." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/basalt-picture-gallery-4122689 (accessed January 19, 2018).