Batman Valentine's Day Cards Through History

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Batman Valentine's Day Cards Through History

DC Comics

A longtime tradition for school children throughout the country is buying cheap Valentine's Day cards to give to all of your classmates for Valentine's Day. These types of cards really came into their own as the Baby Boomer generation grew up after World War II (before World War II, homemade cards were a bit more prevalent, or at least there were less licensed characters) and Batman was a popular star of these cards. Here, then, is a sampling of Batman Valentine's Day cards over the last fifty years. 

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1966 Hallmark

DC Comics

 1966 was the debut of the massively popular Batman TV series. However, the show debuted so early in the year that there was no time to do any direct tie-ins with the show itself, so the licensed Valentine's Day products were all just using art inspired by the comic book itself. Here, you can see in the early days of Valentine's Day cards for kids, they were still trying to look somewhat like a normal greeting card. Cartoonist Mark Anderson has a number of other cards from the set here.

03
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1966 Doubl Go

DC Comics

 These Doubl Go brand Valentine's from the same year are more the style of cheap Valentine's Day cards that people have grown accustomed to over the years. However, what makes them unique is the sort of hand-drawn, hand-written nature of the cards, as the writing on them looks just crude enough to really stand out. And the messages are just flat out odd. Cartoonist Mark Anderson has more of these bizarre cards at his site here

04
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1980 Super Friends

DC Comics

By 1980, these Valentine's were now in their classic form, as kids had roughly 32 square Valentines to choose from that you could tear out of a series of thin cardboard sheets, featuring various DC superheroes, all based on the artwork of Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez

05
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1980 Super Friends Action Playbook

DC Comics

 The 1980 Super Friends collection was officially called an "Action Playbook," as it had a number of other features to it besides just tear out Valentines, as you could also tear out finger puppets and pop-up figures. It did not exactly have a lot to do with Valentine's Day, per se, but I bet it entertained many a kid while they were stuck having to figure out which Valentine to give to which classmate. Cartoonist Mark Anderson has the whole set here for you to look through, including Batman paper airplanes, a Valentine's Day must!

06
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1990 Batman Valentines

DC Comics

It's fascinating to note that Valentines did not change much between 1980 and 1990. Heck, they were even still using Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez as the basis for the artwork for the cards!

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1993 Batman Adventures Valentines

DC Comics

 When Batman: The Animated Series by Bruce Timm and Paul Dini debuted in 1992, it quickly became the perfect type of product to feature on Valentines for kids, and thus most Valentines for the rest of the decade were based on the cartoon series. 

08
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2006 Batman Begins Flashy Foil Valentines

DC Comics

 During the first decade of the 21st Century, Valentines technology took it up a notch for the first time in a while, as shiny foil Valentines became a must in 2006, like these Valentines based on the 2005 film, Batman Begins

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2013 DC Comics Valentines

DC Comics

 In 2013, DC Comics put out a special Valentine's Day comic book called Young Romance: A New 52 Valentine's Day Special #1. At the back of the comic, they included a series of throwback Valentines for their heroes, including this pun-derful Batman one. 

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2013 Dark Knight Rises Lenticular Valentines

DC Comics

 2013 brought us the latest step in the evolution of Batman Valentines, as now lenticular Valentines are all the rage. Lenticular printing allows cards to be given a sense of depth and movement. Besides these Dark Knight Rises-inspired cards, there were also lenticular Batman Valentines based on The Brave and the Bold cartoon series. I wonder what fascinating new technology will be used on Valentines of the future? Hologram projections, perhaps?

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Your Citation
Cronin, Brian. "Batman Valentine's Day Cards Through History." ThoughtCo, Feb. 12, 2016, thoughtco.com/batman-valentines-day-cards-through-history-3860772. Cronin, Brian. (2016, February 12). Batman Valentine's Day Cards Through History. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/batman-valentines-day-cards-through-history-3860772 Cronin, Brian. "Batman Valentine's Day Cards Through History." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/batman-valentines-day-cards-through-history-3860772 (accessed November 21, 2017).