Beehive: Household Magic

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Beehive

How could you use a beehive in a magical working?. Image © Martin Rueggner/Getty Images

For many people, being an effective practitioner of magic includes the ability to think outside the box. By being a creative and imaginative thinker, you can find magical uses for non-magical items. In 2008, About Pagan/Wiccan featured a weekly series in which readers were challenged to find ways of using regular household items as magical tools. For eighteen weeks, our readers came up with unconventional ways to turn regular items around the house into components in magical workings. Let's take a look at some of the mundane items that we offered, and some of the clever and creative ideas our readers had.

Beehive

Ryan: I’ve always loved bees. It’s their unity, and the ferocity they exhibit when they protect their home. 
I’d like to find a group of bees and persuade them to make a home the Oak tree in my yard.
 Then I’d ask them to be the protectors of my yard.

Spellcaster: After some reflecting on bees and their hives,I think that it comes down to this: bees are known to be proficient gatherers. They gather their pollen and then take it to the hive, day in and day out from spring to late fall during the day they labor to bring in their food supply for all in the hive. The hive stores their precious cargo, meaning prosperity to all in the hive. Therefore I would enchant the beehive for prosperity and keep the unused hive in my home as a prosperity charm for a ”sweet” hive of prosperity and luck to my home!

Legends and Lore of Bees

Anavrin: Earlier this year I made it a point to study and learn about one animal and add this knowledge to my Book of Shadows. Strangely enough I had several run ins with bees and so they became my animal to study. Here is some information I found about them. The hexagonal shape of the honeycomb (six was believed to be the number of Aphrodite and later Venus) was the sacred geometric shape of harmony. Bees, who were considered in Greece to be the souls of dead priestesses, were creators of this perfect form and thus greatly revered. Indeed the mathematician Pythagoras believed that the honeycomb form suggested a symmetry that was reflected in the cosmos itself. If I were to find an empty hive I would bring it inside and keep it on my altar. To me it represents abundance, fertility, and harmony. I also read that bee colonies have been slowly dying out and so this beehive would also remind me that nature sometimes needs our help too.

Jodiann: I love beehives, I have collected a few and keep them with all my other “treasures” in my studio. I reflect on their harmony in working together. I think that using them for intention on an important work project, or family project that needs to be done with no competition could be helpful. Sitting and contemplating the wonderful end result that they bring is essential. What we see on the outside is as beautiful as what can’t see on the inside. Kind of like who we are ourselves.

Auroramoon: A bee hive is essentially a home right? It could be used for a meditaion visulization for strengthening your home.

Suburban Witch: Now I’m going completely outside the realm of technicality here, but I would say that a beehive would be great for anything involving work or employment. Bees are known for being hard workers, and I’m sure I’m not the only one who associates bees and work.

Solarraven: Beehives definitely can represent home, harmony, community, building and constructing things as a group and might be used as a focus for work involving group cooperation.
 Queen bees are amazingly fertile so beehives might also be an element for fertility and abundance work. Beehives preserve and protect the sweet honey that the bees create so they might be used as a symbol of gathering sweetness and abundance. Many bees have stingers and they do protect their hives so perhaps the hive might be an element of a protection or defense ritual/spell etc. Bees are known for there skils in finding flowers and their dance which communicates the location of rich flowers to the bee community so perhaps a hive would work in finding and retrieval work etc.

Lady Sage: A beehive speaks to me of power in unity & the energy it can create when we all pull together & work for the common good... and I have always been terrified of bees, wasps, hornets, anything that can sting.

Dawn says: I do a lot of healing work within my magic, and honey is the ultimate antibiotic. It can be put on cuts and scrapes and speeds their healing. It’s packed full of skin conditioners, so I like to put it in my homemade soap. I also find that it’s beautiful, light scent is terrific in aromatherapy. I imagine one could also incorporate a bit of honey into incense or potpourri for ritual use. Finally, make your own candles with the beeswax for use in ritual — burns so much cleaner than paraffin.

Marty: A bee hive, the way it's woven together, is kind of like the way magic is woven in our lives. The bees use the hive for protection, we use magic for protection and as magic is a wonderfull form of natural things so is a bee hive.

Madame G: Considering the ecological problem honeybees are experiencing right now, I would probably use the beehive to invoke nature spirits to help the bees. Maybe a little ceremony using honey and the hive itself, while asking fairies and nature spirits to help the bees?

Cairean: I hold on to bee hive to help re-enforce the positive energy I am projecting out as I say a mother protection (prayer) chant (spell). Sometimes holding something natural helps you envision your target stronger and pull up energy from Mother Earth. As always I keep a candle in front of me so when I push out and release the energy, I can see the amount the flame flickers and I know my positive energy has been sent. Bees are like mothers protectors to their hives like we are to our child at home.