Absolute Beginner English Continue Adverbs of Frequency

Child writing on board
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Students can now talk about their daily habits. Introducing adverbs of frequency can help give them further expressive capabilities by allowing them to speak about how often they perform daily tasks.

Write these adverbs of frequency on the board next to a list of the days of the week. For example:

  • Always - Monday / Tuesday / Wednesday / Thursday / Friday / Saturday / Sunday
  • Usually - Monday / Tuesday / Wednesday / Thursday / Friday / Saturday
  • Often - Monday / Tuesday / Thursday / Sunday
  • Sometimes - Monday / Thursday
  • Seldom - Saturday
  • Never

This list will help students associate the adverbs of frequency with the concept of relative repetition or frequency.

Teacher: I always have breakfast. I usually get up at 7 o'clock. I often watch television. I sometimes exercise. I seldom go shopping. I never cook fish. (Model each adverb of frequency by pointing to it on the board while slowly saying the phrases allowing students to take in the regularity associated with the adverb of frequency being used. Make sure to accent the various adverbs of frequency.)

Teacher: Ken, how often do you come to class? I always come to class. How often do you watch TV? I sometimes watch TV. (Model 'how often' and the adverb of frequency by accenting 'how often' in the question and the adverb of frequency in the response.)

Teacher: Paolo, how often do you come to class?

Student(s): I always come to class.

Teacher: Susan, how often do you watch TV?

Student(s): I sometimes watch TV.

Continue this exercise around the room with each of the students. Use very simple verbs that the students have already become used to using when talking about their daily routines so that they can focus on learning the adverbs of frequency. Pay special attention to the placement of the adverb of frequency. If a student makes a mistake, touch your ear to signal that the student should listen and then repeat his/her answer accenting what the student should have said.

Part II: Expanding to third person singular

Teacher: Paolo, how often do you eat lunch?

Student(s): I usually eat lunch.

Teacher: Susan, does he usually eat lunch?

Student(s): Yes, he usually eats lunch. (pay special attention to the 's' ending on the third person singular)

Teacher: Susan, do you usually get up at ten o'clock?

Student(s): No, I never get up at ten o'clock.

Teacher: Olaf, does she usually get up at ten o'clock?

Student(s): No, she never gets up at ten o'clock.

etc.

Continue this exercise around the room with each of the students. Use very simple verbs that the students have already become used to using when talking about their daily routines so that they can focus on learning the adverbs of frequency. Pay special attention to the placement of the adverb of frequency and the correct usage of the third person singular. If a student makes a mistake, touch your ear to signal that the student should listen and then repeat his/her answer accenting what the student should have said.

Back to the Absolute Beginner 20 Point Program

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