Absolute Beginner English Continue Daily Habits and Routines

After students have completed this lesson they will be able to complete most basic linguistic functions (giving personal information, identifying and basic description skills, talking about basic daily tasks and how often those taks are done). While there is obviously a lot more learning to be done, students can now feel confident that they have a strong base on which to build in the future.

With this final lesson, you can help students begin speaking in longer phrases by having them prepare a talk on their daily activities that they can then read / recite to their fellow classmates and which can then be used as the basis for questions.

Give the students a sheet with various times of the day. For example:

  • 7.00
  • 7.30
  • 8.00
  • 10.00
  • 12.00
  • 3.30
  • 5.00
  • 6.30
  • 8.00
  • 11.00

Add a list of verbs they are familiar with on the board. You may want to write a few examples on the board. For example:

  • 7.00 - get up
  • 7.30 - eat breakfast
  • 8.00 - go to work

Teacher: I usually get up at 7 o'clock. I always go to work at 8 o'clock. I sometimes have a break at half past three. I usually come home at five o'clock. I often watch TV at eight o'clock. etc. (Model your list of daily activities to the class two or more times.)

Teacher: Paolo, what do I often do at eight o'clock in the evening?

Student(s): You often watch TV.

Teacher: Susan, when do I go to work?

Student(s): You always go to work at 8 o'clock.

Continue this exercise around the room asking students about your daily routine. Pay special attention to the placement of the adverb of frequency. If a student makes a mistake, touch your ear to signal that the student should listen and then repeat his/her answer accenting what the student should have said.

Part II: Students Talk about their Daily Routines

Ask students to fill out the sheet about their daily habits and routines. When students are finished they should read their list of daily habits to the class.

Teacher: Paolo, please read.

Student(s): I usually get up at seven o'clock. I seldom have breakfast at half past seven.

I often go shopping at 8 o'clock. I usually have coffee at ten o'clock. etc.

Ask each student to read their routine in class, let students read all the way through their list and take note of any mistakes they may make. At this point, students need to gain confidence when speaking for an extended period of time and should therefore be allowed to make mistakes. Once the student has finished, you can correct any mistakes he or she may have made.

Part III: Asking Students about their Daily Routines

Ask students to once again read about their daily routine to the class. After each student has finished, ask the other students questions about that student's daily habits.

Teacher: Paolo, please read.

Student(s): I usually get up at seven o'clock. I seldom have breakfast at half past seven. I often go shopping at eight o'clock. I usually have coffee at ten o'clock. etc.

Teacher: Olaf, when does Paolo usually get up?

Student(s): He gets up at seven o'clock.

Teacher: Susan, how does Paolo go shopping at eight o'clock?

Student(s): He often goes shopping at eight o'clock.

Continue this exercise around the room with each of the students. Pay special attention to the placement of the adverb of frequency and the correct usage of the third person singular. If a student makes a mistake, touch your ear to signal that the student should listen and then repeat his/her answer accenting what the student should have said.

Back to the Absolute Beginner 20 Point Program