Absolute Beginner English Possessive Adjectives and Pronouns

ABCs
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Part I: 'My' and 'Your'

Your learners have now learned some basic vocabulary, simple positive and negative statements with 'to be', as well as questions. Now you can introduce the possessive adjectives 'my', 'your', 'his', and 'her'. It is best to stay away from 'its' at this point. You can work on getting students to know each other by using their names for this exercise, before going on to objects.

Teacher: (Model a question to yourself changing places in the room, or changing your voice to indicate that you are modeling. ) Is your name Ken? Yes, my name is Ken. (stress 'your' and 'my' - repeat a few times)

Teacher: Is your name Ken? (ask a student)

Student(s): No, my name is Paolo.

Continue this exercise around the room with each of the students. If a student makes a mistake, touch your ear to signal that the student should listen and then repeat his/her answer accenting what the student should have said.

Part II: Expand to include 'his' and 'her'

Teacher: (Model a question to yourself changing places in the room, or changing your voice to indicate that you are modeling. ) Is her name Jennifer? No, her name isn't Jennifer. Her name is Gertrude.

Teacher: (Model a question to yourself changing places in the room, or changing your voice to indicate that you are modeling. ) Is his name John?

No, his name isn't John. His name is Mark.

(Make sure to accent the differences between 'her' and 'his')

Teacher: Is his name Gregory? (ask a student)

Student(s): Yes, his name is Gregory. OR No, his name isn't Gregory. His name is Peter.

Continue this exercise around the room with each of the students. If a student makes a mistake, touch your ear to signal that the student should listen and then repeat his/her answer accenting what the student should have said.

Part III: Having students ask questions

Teacher: Is her name Maria? (ask a student)

Teacher: Paolo, ask John a question. (Point from one student to the next indicating that he / she should ask a question thereby introducing the new teacher request 'ask a question', in the future you should then use this form instead of pointing to move away from the visual to the aural.)

Student 1: Is his name Jack?

Student 2: Yes, his name is Jack. OR No, his name isn't Jack. His name is Peter.

Continue this exercise around the room with each of the students.

Part IV: Possessive Pronouns

It's a good idea to teach possessive pronouns together with possessive adjectives

Teacher: Is that book yours? (ask yourself to model)

 

Teacher: Yes, that book is mine. (Make sure to accent 'yours' and 'mine') Alessandro ask Jennifer about her pencil. 

Student 1: Is that pencil yours?

Student 2: Yes, that pencil is mine. 

Continue this exercise around the room with each of the students.

 

Move on to 'his' and 'hers' in the same manner. Once completed, begin to mix the two forms together. First alternating between 'my' and 'mine' and then alternating between other forms. This exercise should be repeated a number of times. 

Teacher: (holding up a book) This is my book.

The book is mine. 

Write the two sentences on the board. Ask students to repeat the two sentences with various objects they have. Once finished with 'my' and 'mine' continue with 'your' and 'yours', 'his' and 'hers'.

Teacher: That is your computer. The computer is yours.

etc.

Back to the Absolute Beginner 20 Point Program