A Brief History of Niger - Part 1

Where in Africa is Niger?
Where in Africa is Niger?. Image: © Alistair Boddy-Evans. Used with Permission.

Early Humans:


Considerable evidence indicates that about 600,000 years ago, humans inhabited what has since become the desolate Sahara of northern Niger. Long before the arrival of French influence and control in the area, Niger was an important economic crossroads, and the empires of Songhai, Mali, Gao, Kanem, and Bornu, as well as a number of Hausa states, claimed control over portions of the area.

African States and Empires:


During recent centuries, the nomadic Tuareg formed large confederations, pushed southward, and, siding with various Hausa states, clashed with the Fulani Empire of Sokoto, which had gained control of much of the Hausa territory in the late 18th century.

Europeans Arrive:


In the 19th century, contact with the West began when the first European explorers – notably Mungo Park (British) and Heinrich Barth (German) – explored the area searching for the mouth of the Niger River. Although French efforts at pacification began before 1900, dissident ethnic groups, especially the desert Tuareg, were not subdued until 1922, when Niger became a French colony.

Development as a French Colony:


Niger's colonial history and development parallel that of other French West African territories. France administered its West African colonies through a governor general at Dakar, Senegal, and governors in the individual territories, including Niger.

In addition to conferring French citizenship on the inhabitants of the territories, the 1946 French constitution provided for decentralization of power and limited participation in political life for local advisory assemblies.

Niger Achieves Independence:


A further revision in the organization of overseas territories occurred with the passage of the Overseas Reform Act (Loi Cadre) of 23 July 1956, followed by reorganizational measures enacted by the French Parliament early in 1957.

In addition to removing voting inequalities, these laws provided for creation of governmental organs, assuring individual territories a large measure of self-government. After the establishment of the Fifth French Republic on 4 December 1958, Niger became an autonomous state within the French Community. Following full independence on 3 August 1960, however, membership was allowed to lapse.

Single-Party Rule:


For its first 14 years as an independent state, Niger was run by a single-party civilian regime under the presidency of Hamani Diori, Parti Progressiste Nigérien (PPN, Progressive Party of Niger). In 1974, a combination of devastating drought and accusations of rampant corruption resulted in a military coup that overthrew the Diori regime. Lieutenant Colonel Seyni Kountché and a small group of military ruled the country until Kountché's death in 1987.

Military Government:


He was succeeded by his Chief of Staff, Brigadier General. Ali Saibou, who released political prisoners, liberalized some of Niger's laws and policies, and promulgated a new constitution. However, President Saibou's efforts to control political reforms failed in the face of union and student demands to institute a multi-party democratic system.

The Saibou regime acquiesced to these demands by the end of 1990.

Preparing the way for Democracy:


New political parties and civic associations sprang up, and a national conference was convened in July 1991 to prepare the way for the adoption of a new constitution and the holding of free and fair elections. The debate was often contentious and accusatory, but under the leadership of Prof. Andre Salifou, the conference developed consensus on the modalities of a transition government.

Transition Government:


A transition government was installed in November 1991 to manage the affairs of state until the institutions of the Third Republic were put into place in April 1993. While the economy deteriorated over the course of the transition, certain accomplishments stand out, including the successful conduct of a constitutional referendum; the adoption of key legislation such as the electoral and rural codes; and the holding of several free, fair, and nonviolent nationwide elections.

Freedom of the press flourished with the appearance of several new independent newspapers.

Military Coup Once Again:


On 16 April 1993 Mahamane Ousmane was elected president, leader of the Convention Démocratique et Sociale (CDS, Democratic and Social Convention). Rivalries within the ruling coalition led to governmental paralysis, which provided Col. Ibrahim Baré Maïnassara a rationale to overthrow the Third Republic and its President, Mahamane Ousmane, in January 1996. While leading a military authority that ran the government (Conseil de Salut National) during a 6-month transition period, Chairman Baré enlisted specialists to draft a new constitution for a Fourth Republic announced in May 1996.

Next: A Brief History of Niger - Part 2


(Text from Public Domain material, US Department of State Background Notes.)