Caravaggio - A 400th Anniversary Exhibition

01
of 13
The Cardsharps, ca. 1594

Image © 2010 Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). The Cardsharps, ca. 1594. Oil on canvas. 94.2 x 130.9 cm (37 1/8 x 51 5/8 in.). AP 1987.06. Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth. Image © 2010 Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth

On View February 20-June 13, 2010 at the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible. Failing that, the Scuderie del Quirinale has kindly made this virtual gallery of over half of the works available. Enjoy!


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

02
of 13
The Musicians, ca. 1595

Image © 2009 The Metropolitan Museum of Art; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). The Musicians, ca. 1595. Oil on canvas. 92.1 x 118.4 cm (36 1/4 x 46 5/8 in.). Rogers Fund, 1952 (52.81). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Image © 2009 The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource / Scala, Florence


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

03
of 13
The Lute Player, 1595-96

Image © The State Hermitage Museum; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). The Lute Player, 1595-96. Oil on canvas. 94 cm x 119 cm (37 × 47 in.). State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg. Photo by Natalia Antonova, Inessa Regentova. Image © The State Hermitage Museum


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

04
of 13
Bacchus, 1597

Image © Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). Bacchus, 1597. Oil on canvas. 95 x 85 cm (37 3/8 x 33 7/16 in.). Image © Soprintendenza Speciale per il Patrimonio Storico Artistico ed Etnoantropologico e per il Polo Museale della città di Firenze. Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

05
of 13
Basket of Fruit, end of the 16th-century

Image © 2009 Scala, Florence; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). Basket of Fruit, end of the 16th-century. Oil on canvas. 48 x 62 cm (18 7/8 x 24 3/8 in.). Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, Milan. Image © 2009 Scala, Florence


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

06
of 13
Judith Beheading Holofernes, 1599-1600

Image © Palazzo Barberini, Rome; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). Judith Beheading Holofernes, 1599-1600. Oil on canvas. 145 x 195 cm (57 × 77 in.). Image © Soprintendenza Speciale PSAE e per il Polo Museale della Città di Roma / Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica. Palazzo Barberini, Rome


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

07
of 13
Conversion of Saul, 1600-01

Image © Odescalchi Balbi Collection, Rome; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). Conversion of Saul, 1600-01. Oil on panel. 237 x 189 cm (93 × 74 in.). Odescalchi Balbi Collection, Rome. Image © Odescalchi Balbi Collection, Rome


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

08
of 13
Deposition from the Cross, ca. 1600-04

Image © Vatican Museums Photographic Archives; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). Deposition from the Cross, ca. 1600-04. Oil on canvas. 300 x 203 cm (118 1/16 x 79 7/8 in.). Cat. 40386. Vatican Museums, Vatican City. Image © Vatican Museums Photographic Archives


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

09
of 13
The Supper at Emmaus, 1601

Image © 2009 The National Gallery, London / Scala, Florence; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). The Supper at Emmaus, 1601. Oil and tempera on canvas. 141 x 196.2 cm (55 1/2 x 77 3/16 in.). Presented by the Hon. George Vernon, 1839. NG172. The National Gallery, London. Image © 2009 The National Gallery, London / Scala, Florence


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

10
of 13
Love Conquers All (Amor Victorious), 1602

Image © Staatliche Museen Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). Love Conquers All (Amor Victorious), 1602. Oil on canvas. 156.5 x 113.3 cm (61 9/16 x 44 9/16 in.). Staatliche Museen Berlin, Gemäldegalerie. Photo: Jörg P. Anders. Image © Staatliche Museen Berlin, Gemäldegalerie, Einrichtung der Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

11
of 13
The Crowning with Thorns, 1602-05

Image © Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). The Crowning with Thorns, 1602-05. Oil on canvas. 127 x 165 cm (50 x 64 15/16 in.). Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna. Image © Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

12
of 13
Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness, 1604-05

Image © The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness, 1604-05. Oil on canvas. 172.7 x 132.1 cm (68 x 52 in.). Purchase: William Rockhill Nelson Trust, 52-25. Photograph by Jamison Miller. Image © The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.

13
of 13
Sleeping Cupid, 1608

Image © Galleria Palatina, Palazzo Pitti Florence; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). Sleeping Cupid, 1608. Oil on canvas. 72 x 105 cm (28 5/16 x 41 5/16 in.). Galleria Palatina, Palazzo Pitti Florence. Image © Soprintendenza Speciale per il Patrimonio Storico Artistico ed Etnoantropologico


In observance of the the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque master's death, the Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome has organized the major International exhibition Caravaggio. As is common knowledge, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) lived hard, died young, took long breaks from painting (due to the first attribute) and didn't have a tremendous output as a result. Over the centuries, however, many more works than he could have physically produced have been attributed to him.

Caravaggio aims--and succeeds--in displaying only paintings authenticated to be of Caravaggio's hand. The 24 select pieces illustrate the full scope of his short, brilliant career, and represent a phenomenal amount of goodwill amongst lending museums around the globe. You won't see the likes of this exhibition again, so please catch the show in Rome if possible.