Close, Clothes, and Cloths

Commonly Confused Words

The verb close (pronounced "kloz") means to shut, complete, or bring to an end. The adjective close (pronounced "klos") means near, compact, or familiar.

The noun clothes means "clothing."

Cloths is the plural of the noun cloth (fabric).

Examples:

  • You should never close the door when a close friend calls.
  • Put your filthy clothes in the hamper, and then wipe your face with a damp cloth.
     
  • "I ran down the hall to the linen closet and grabbed several white sheets to serve as cloths for the card tables I intended to string together."
    (Ann B. Ross, Miss Julia Throws a Wedding. Penguin, 2002)

    Practice:

    (a) Crazy Jane's ______ appear to have been made out of old rags sewn together.

    (b) "To draw you must _____ your eyes and sing."
    (Pablo Picasso)

    (c) Gus left his new work ______ hanging on the line during the snowstorm.

    (d) Bob has a _____ relationship with the president.

    (e) "Because oils can leave a film, avoid using oily _____ on glass, china, or similar materials that might be dulled or smeared."
    (Cheryl Mendelson, Home Comforts, 1999)

    Answers to Practice Exercises

    Glossary of Commonly Confused Words

    Answers to Practice Exercises: Close, Clothes, and Cloths

    (a) Crazy Jane's clothes appear to have been made out of old rags sewn together.

    (b) "To draw you must close your eyes and sing."
    (Pablo Picasso)

    (c) Gus left his new work clothes hanging on the line.

    (d) Bob has a close relationship with the president.

    (e) "Because oils can leave a film, avoid using oily cloths on glass, china, or similar materials that might be dulled or smeared."
    (Cheryl Mendelson, Home Comforts, 1999)
     

    Glossary of Commonly Confused Words