Coaches With Multiple National Championships

Since the NCAA Tournament started in 1939, national champions have come from all corners of the country. It takes a mix of recruiting, coaching style, and luck to win a national championship, and only a handful of coaches have won more than one title. 

01
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John Wooden

Joh Mooden
Getty Images/Adam Pretty / Staff

UCLA's longtime coach was the first to NCAA coach to hit double-digits in national championships, winning 10 in a 12-year period starting in 1964. Wooden's Bruins won seven titles in a row from 1967 to 1973, becoming the NCAA's most successful dynasty.

Championship years: 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975

02
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Mike Krzyzewski

Mike Krzyzewski
Getty Images/Lance King / Contributor

Putting the Duke Blue Devils on the map, Coach K—a nickname he earned in part because of so many misspellings and mispronunciations of his last name—became a mainstay deep in the NCAA tournament starting in the 1990s, winning back to back championships and three more after 2000.

Championship years: 1991, 1992, 2001, 2010, 2015

03
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Adolph Rupp

Adolph Rupp
Getty Images/Bettmann / Contributor

The namesake for Kentucky's downtown arena won back-to-back championships in 1948 and 1949, and endured only one non-winning record—a 16-16 campaign in 1966-67—in a 42-season career, cementing the Wildcat head coaching position as one of the most coveted in the nation. Rupp was the winningest coach in NCAA history until 1997.

Championship years: 1948, 1948, 1951, 1958 

04
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Jim Calhoun

Jim Calhoun
Getty Images/Winslow Townson / Stringer

Bringing the first men's national championship to Connecticut, Calhoun helped his Huskies mirror some of the success of the school's absolutely dominant women's team, taking home three titles and emerging as a perennial powerhouse.​

Championship years: 1999, 2004, 2011

05
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Bob Knight

Bob Knight
Getty Images/Streeter Lecka / Staff

The Hoosiers' fiery coach was famous for his colorful sideline antics and post-game rants, but his in-game strategies were just as newsworthy. Earning Indiana three championships, Knight helped bring national recognition back to the Hoosier state.

Championship years: 1976, 1981, 1987

06
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Roy Williams

Roy Williams
Getty Images/Grant Halverson / Stringer

After several just-miss chances at Kansas, Williams came home to North Carolina and helped enhance the Tar Heels' legacy. He won a championship in just his second season, and more importantly, renewed the back-and-forth title chase with the in-state rival Duke.

Championship years: 2005, 2009, 2017

07
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Denny Crum

Denny Crum
Getty Images/Stephen Dunn / Staff

After so many years of success over in Lexington, Crum brought the national championship west to Louisville twice. A former assistant under Wooden, Crum coached the Cardinals for 30 seasons and helped foster a rivalry with the Kentucky Wildcats. 

Championship years: 1980, 1986

08
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Billy Donovan

Billy Donovan
Getty Images/Dylan Buell / Contributor

Florida's coach brought the first two basketball championships to Gainsville and pulled some of the spotlight over from the school's successful football program. The championship runs garnered Donovan an NBA offer from the Orlando Magic, one he accepted but then turned down because of the lure of being the Gators' head coach.

Championship years: 2006, 2007

09
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Henry Iba

Henry Iba
Getty Images/Bettmann / Contributor

The Cowboys were the first basketball team to win back-to-back championships in NCAA history under Iba, whose tenure stretched 35 seasons. 

Championship years: 1945, 1946

10
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Ed Jucker

Ed Jucker
Wikimedia Commons

Jucker made the most of his five seasons in Cincinnati, winning national championships in his first two and reaching the finals in his third. The Bearcats' overtime loss to Loyola of Chicago in 1963 was his only defeat in postseason play, giving him an 11-1 lifetime record in the championship tournament.

Championship years: 1961, 1962 

11
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Branch McCracken

Branch McCracken
Wikimedia Commons

McCracken got Indiana started, winning a national title in his second season and adding another one to the halls in Bloomington 13 seasons later.

Championship years: 1940, 1953

12
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Rick Pitino

Rick Pitino
Getty Images/ Joe Robbins / Stringer

Pitino's second title was miles apart from his first—78 miles to be exact. After already bringing a championship to Lexington as coach of the Kentucky Wildcats, Pitino won a national title as coach of the Louisville Cardinals 17 years later.

Championship years: 1996, 2013

13
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Dean Smith

Dean Smith
Getty Images/Doug Pensinger / Staff

North Carolina's iconic coach touched a lot of lives in winning two national championships and surpassing Rupp in 1997, when he was then the winningest coach in NCAA history. Many of his assistant coaches, including Williams and Larry Brown, went on to successful careers, as did many of his players, including Michael Jordan and James Worthy, cementing a legacy that would be known as the "Carolina Way."

Championship years: 1982, 1993

14
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Phil Woolpert

Phil Woolpert and team
Getty Images

San Francisco won back-to-back titles under Woolpert and came up just short of a third consecutive championship in 1957, when the Dons lost in the Final Four. USF won 60 consecutive games with Woolpert on the sideline and future NBA greats K.C. Jones and Bill Russell in the lineup.  

Championship years: 1955, 1956