Columbia University Photo Tour

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Grove, Allen. "Columbia University Photo Tour." ThoughtCo, Feb. 28, 2017, thoughtco.com/columbia-university-photo-tour-788508. Grove, Allen. (2017, February 28). Columbia University Photo Tour. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/columbia-university-photo-tour-788508 Grove, Allen. "Columbia University Photo Tour." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/columbia-university-photo-tour-788508 (accessed September 25, 2017).
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Low Memorial Library at Columbia University

Low Memorial Library at Columbia
Low Memorial Library at Columbia. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Located in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Upper Manhattan, Columbia University is one of the eight members of the prestigious Ivy League, and it is one of the most selective colleges in the country. Founded in 1754, Columbia is the oldest college in New York State. The university moved to its current location in 1897, and some of the university's current buildings were designed in the Italian Renaissance style by the famous architectural firm McKim, Mead, and White.

When visitors first set foot on campus, they will be struck by the great dome of Low Library, a structure modeled after the Pantheon in Rome. The building's impressive rotunda originally served as the university's main reading room, and today it is used for events and exhibitions. In the 1930s, Butler replaced Low as Columbia's main library, and Low Library now houses main administrative offices including the President and Provost. The building is also home to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

02
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Low Plaza at Columbia University

Low Plaza at Columbia University
Low Plaza at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Outside the front doors of Low Library is Low Plaza, Columbia University's central outdoor space. Surrounded on all sides by impressive buildings, the plaza bustles with students heading to classes and residence halls, and in good weather, it is a favorite place for studying and socializing. Many special events are also held in Low Plaza, and it's not unusual to find the space being used for a concert, fair, or theatrical production.

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Earl Hall at Columbia University

Earl Hall at Columbia University
Earl Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

One of Columbia University's many iconic buildings, Earl Hall first opened its doors in 1902. The building is an important place for community-minded students who want to help others. The non-profit organization Community Impact is headquartered here, and each year nearly 1,000 Columbia students volunteer to help provide food, clothing, shelter, education, and job training to those in need from the surrounding neighborhoods.

Earl Hall is also home to the University Chaplain and the United Campus Ministries. Columbia has a diverse student population from around the country and the globe, and United Campus Ministries reflects this diversity. The organization includes clergy and lay people from a wide range of religious backgrounds, and the group provides counseling, outreach, educational activities and religious ceremonies for the Columbia community.

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Lewisohn Hall at Columbia University

Lewisohn Hall at Columbia University
Lewisohn Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Adult and non-traditional students will quickly become familiar with Lewisohn Hall, home to Columbia's School of General Studies for bachelor's degree students, and the School of Continuing Education and General Studies for master's degree seekers.

The School of General Studies has about 1,500 students of which more than a third are taking classes part-time. The average age of GS students is 29. GS undergraduates take the same courses with the same faculty as traditional Columbia undergraduates.

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Butler Library at Columbia University

Butler Library at Columbia University
Butler Library at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

At the opposite end of Low Plaza from Low Library stands Butler Library, Columbia University's primary undergraduate library. The Columbia library system houses over ten million volumes and subscribes to over 140,000 serials. The Rare Book & Manuscript Library located in Butler holds 750,000 rare books and 28 million manuscripts. While the library often isn't high on the list of considerations when students choose a college, prospective Columbia students should keep in mind that they will have access to one of the very best research libraries in the country.

With its computer labs and numerous study rooms and carrels, Butler is also an excellent place to do homework and prepare for exams. The library is open 24 hours a day throughout the semester.

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Uris Hall at Columbia University

Uris Hall at Columbia University
Uris Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Located right behind Low Library you'll find Uris Hall, home to the Columbia Business School. The imposing concrete structure is a fitting match for the school's strength. Columbia's MBA programs frequently rank among the top 10 in the nation and the school graduates over 1,000 students a year. The Business School is the largest of Columbia's many schools for graduate study.

Columbia University does not have undergraduate programs in business administration.

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Havemeyer Hall at Columbia University

Havemeyer Hall at Columbia University
Havemeyer Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Columbia University has strong programs in the natural sciences, and Havemeyer Hall is home to the Department of Chemistry. Many Nobel Prize winners have graced the halls of this historic building, and it's hard to not be impressed by Havemeyer's main lecture hall with its 40-foot domed ceiling.

Columbia has more graduate than undergraduate chemistry majors, but the field is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary. The chemistry faculty support many other majors including biochemistry, environmental chemistry, and chemical physics. Students who don't want to pursue a full major in chemistry can complete a less demanding concentration in chemistry that will complement a major in another field.

08
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Dodge Physical Fitness Center at Columbia University

Dodge Physical Fitness Center at Columbia University
Dodge Physical Fitness Center at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Urban campuses face a significant challenge when it comes to sports and physical fitness. Rarely do urban universities have the real estate to build the types of giant sports complexes and fitness centers we often see at campuses with greater acreage.

Columbia University's solution was to move its athletic facilities underground. Right next to Havemeyer Hall a ramp leads down to the Dodge Physical Fitness Center. Dodge houses three levels of exercise equipment as well as a swimming pool, indoor track, basketball court, and squash and racquetball courts.

For football, soccer, baseball, and other sports that require more space, Columbia University's Baker Athletic Complex is located at the very tip of Manhattan at 218th Street. The complex includes a 17,000-seat stadium.

09
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Pupin Hall at Columbia University

Pupin Hall at Columbia University
Pupin Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

You'll have no difficulty recognizing Pupin Hall -- it's the only building with an observatory on its roof. With all the light pollution, however, Manhattan isn't the best place for star gazing, but the two telescopes on Pupin are used for teaching and public outreach.

Columbia graduate students, however, have access the two large telescopes at MDM Observatory on Kitt Peak in Arizona. Along with Columbia, this powerful observatory shares its facilities with Dartmouth, Ohio State, the University of Michigan, and Ohio University.

Pupin Hall is home to Columbia's Physics and Astronomy Departments. The building's greatest claim to fame dates back to 1939 when George Pegram split a uranium atom in the basement. The Manhattan Project and development of the atomic bomb grew out of those experiments.

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Schapiro Center at Columbia University

Schapiro Center at Columbia University
Schapiro Center at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

The northern end of Columbia's campus is dominated by the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The Schapiro Center is one of the three buildings that serves as the primary home for the school. Columbia offers engineering and applied science degrees in numerous fields: applied physics, applied mathematics, biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, earth and environmental engineering, financial engineering, industrial engineering, materials science, and mechanical engineering and operations research.

Among undergraduates, operations research, biomedical engineering, civil engineering, and mechanical engineering are most popular. In 2010, Columbia awarded a total of 333 bachelor's degrees in engineering, 558 master's degrees. and 84 doctoral degrees.

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Schermerhorn Hall at Columbia University

Schermerhorn Hall at Columbia University
Schermerhorn Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Just south of the School of Engineering you'll find Schermerhorn Hall, one of many buildings that date back to the 1890s. The building originally housed natural sciences, but today it is home to a wide assortment of programs including African-American Studies, Art History and Archaeology, Geology, Psychology and Women's Studies.

The building also houses the Wallach Fine Arts Center and the Center for Environmental Research and Conservation.

12
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Avery Hall at Columbia University

Avery Hall at Columbia University
Avery Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Avery Hall is one of the Italian Renaissance style buildings designed by McKim, Mead and White in the early days of the Morningside Heights campus. The building is home to Columbia's prestigious Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation. Hundreds of master's students graduate from the program each year.

Avery is also home to one of the 22 libraries in Columbia's library system. The Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library has extensive holdings related to architecture, art, archaeology, historic preservation, and city planning. The library has nearly a half million volumes, 1,000 periodicals, and about 1.5 million drawings and original records.

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St. Paul's Chapel at Columbia University

St. Paul's Chapel at Columbia University
St. Paul's Chapel at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

St. Paul's Chapel is Columbia University's non-denominational church where regular services are offered for students of different faiths. The building is also used for select lectures and concerts.

Built in 1904, the building's architecture is stunning with its marble floors, stained glass windows and domed tile ceiling.

14
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Greene Hall at Columbia University

Greene Hall at Columbia University
Greene Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Jerome L. Greene Hall is the main building of Columbia University's prestigious Law School. This imposing building sits at the corner of West 116th Street at Amsterdam Avenue. Connecting Greene Hall to the main undergraduate campus is Charles H. Revson Plaza, a public common area elevated above Amsterdam Avenue.

The first floor of Greene Hall is home to many of the core classrooms for the Law School. The second, third, and fourth floors of the building house the Diamond Law Library and its collection of nearly 400,000 titles.

Columbia Law School consistently ranks among the very top law schools in the country. Admission is extremely selective. In 2010, 430 students earned their doctor of law degrees from Columbia.

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Alfred Lerner Hall at Columbia University

Alfred Lerner Hall at Columbia University
Alfred Lerner Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

At the southeast corner of the main academic quadrangle stands Alfred Lerner Hall, Columbia University's bustling student center. The glass facade and modern design stand in contrast to the classical designs of most of the other surrounding buildings. Construction of the building was completed in 1999 for a total cost of about $85 million.

The building's facilities are at the heart of Columbia's student life. Alfred Learner Hall contains two dining areas, exhibition space, meeting rooms, a party space, thousands of student mailboxes, two computer rooms (one with 24-hour access), a game room, a theater, a cinema, and a large auditorium.

16
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Hamilton Hall at Columbia University

Hamilton Hall at Columbia University
Hamilton Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Completed in 1907, Hamilton Hall is another of Columbia's historic buildings designed by the highly regarded McKim, Mead and White architectural firm. The building serves as the home to Columbia College, the main undergraduate college at the university. The college prides itself on its long-standing yet ever-evolving Core Curriculum in which beginning students grapple with big questions in small seminars. The Core Curriculum creates a shared intellectual experience for all of the college's students through six required courses: Contemporary Civilization, Literature Humanities, University Writing, Art Humanities, Music Humanities and Frontiers of Science. You can learn more about the program on Columbia's Core Curriculum homepage.

Although Columbia University is a large research institution in a bustling urban environment, the school has embraced the types of small classes and close interactions with the faculty that are more common at a liberal arts college. Columbia College has an impressive 7 to 1 student/faculty ratio (3 to 1 in the physical sciences), and roughly 94% of students graduate in four years. Learn more on the "About the College" page on Columbia's website.

17
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Journalism Hall at Columbia University

Journalism Hall at Columbia University
Journalism Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Columbia University is home to one of the oldest professional schools of journalism in the country, and it is the only journalism school in the Ivy League. The school graduates several hundred master students a year and a few PhD students. The 10-month master of science (MS) program offers four areas of specialization: newspaper, magazine, broadcast, and digital media. The 9-month master of arts (MA) program, designed for experienced journalists to hone and develop their skills, has concentrations in politics, health and the environment, business and economics, and the arts.

The Columbia Journalism School has many claims to fame. The construction of Journalism Hall was funded by Joseph Pulitzer, and the famous Pulitzer Prizes and duPont Awards are administered by the school. The school is also home to the Columbia Journalism Review

Admission is selective. For the 2011 academic year, 47% of MS students, 32% of MA students, and just over 4% of PhD students were admitted. And if you can get in, you may find the cost prohibitive -- tuition, fees, and living expenses are well over $70,000.

18
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Hartley and Wallach Halls at Columbia University

Hartley and Wallach Halls at Columbia University
Hartley and Wallach Halls at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Located right next to Hamilton Hall, Hartley Hall and Wallach Hall are two of Columbia's undergraduate residence halls. For the 2011-2012 academic year, the typical cost of room and board for undergraduates was around $11,000. This obviously isn't cheap, but it represents a real bargain when you look at the cost of living off campus in Manhattan.

Although the two buildings are configured differently, Hartley and Wallach each have suite-style living. Each suite has its own kitchen and one or two bathrooms, depending on the size of the suite. Harley and Wallach Halls provide a different living environment than any of the other options for first-year students -- the residence halls are home to both first-year and upperclass students, and they are part of the Living Learning Center, an environment that allows students to integrate their academic and extra-curricular interests into their residential environment. Check out one of the Wallach single-occupancy rooms in this virtual tour

Columbia University guarantees housing for all four years for undergraduates in Columbia College and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. 99% of first-year students live in Columbia's residence halls, as do the great majority of upper-level students.

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John Jay Hall at Columbia University

John Jay Hall at Columbia University
John Jay Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Located on 114th Street on the southeast corner of the Morningside campus's main quadrangle, John Jay Hall is a large residence hall for first-year students. The building's lower floors also house a large dining hall, a small convenience store, and the Health Center.

John Jay Hall has mostly single-occupancy rooms, and each hallway has shared men's and women's bathrooms. You can check out what a single-occupancy room looks like in this virtual tour.

The building's name may sound familiar since New York City is also home to John Jay College, one of the eleven senior colleges in the CUNY system. John Jay College is one of the top in the country for preparing students to work in law enforcement and criminal justice. John Jay was a Columbia graduate and the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

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Furnald Hall at Columbia University

Furnald Hall at Columbia University
Furnald Hall at Columbia University. Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Furnald Hall is a residence hall for first-year and sophomore students. The building sits next door to the Alfred Lerner Hall, the university's student center. The building has predominately single-occupancy rooms, but also a couple dozen doubles. Each floor has shared men's and women's bathrooms, and you'll find a kitchen and small lounge on each hallway. The building was renovated in 1996. Check out one of the double rooms in this virtual tour.

To learn more about Columbia University, be sure to visit the university's official website

Format
mla apa chicago
Your Citation
Grove, Allen. "Columbia University Photo Tour." ThoughtCo, Feb. 28, 2017, thoughtco.com/columbia-university-photo-tour-788508. Grove, Allen. (2017, February 28). Columbia University Photo Tour. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/columbia-university-photo-tour-788508 Grove, Allen. "Columbia University Photo Tour." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/columbia-university-photo-tour-788508 (accessed September 25, 2017).