Comedic Female Monologue From the Three-Act Play "Tomorrow's Wish"

Actress rehearsing under spotlight on stage.
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The following is a monologue from the three-act play Tomorrow’s Wish, written and shared by Wade Bradford. Tomorrow's Wish is a comedy-drama including some elements of fantasy. The story is about a 16-year-old character, Megan Pomerville, who has to deal with her strange yet friendly cousin, Juniper. Juniper was homeschooled and has lived a sheltered life, but Megan's perspective changes when she finds out Juniper's secret.

This original comedic female monologue is available to be used by students, actors, and directors for educational or professional purposes.

Context of the Monologue Within the Play

Juniper is a creative young woman with learning disabilities. Her cousins believe Juniper is odd because she lives in a small town with her grandmother, sheltered away from most of the world. In this scene, she is talking to her cousin, Megan, about her first and only kiss. The monologue follows:

"I kissed a boy once. At least I tried. I don’t know if it counts if they don’t kiss back. But I tried to kiss a boy and it almost worked. Most of the time Grandma and I don’t get to see folks much, but we go into town. Sometimes. And Grandma says I just have to be careful to mind my manners, and Grandma says I’m real good at being careful, but sometimes I get so bored in that little town. Only one video store. Only two churches. And the park only has two swings and a pool that never gets filled up anymore. But in our little town there is a boy named Samuel. He's a bag-boy at the grocery store. He does it just right and never squishes the eggs.

And he has red hair and green eyes. And… (Laughs at the memory.)
Freckles all over his face! And Samuel is so nice. So nice to me and Gram. He would always smile and always say “Thank you” and “You're welcome.” If he says, “Have a nice day,” then you do. That’s
how good he is at his job. And I always wanted… I always wanted to be close to him, or to talk to him, without Gram around.

And one day when Grandma had a really bad cold I got to go to the
store all by myself. And I bought some oyster crackers and some medicine. Then I got to watch Samuel all by myself. Watch him do his bag boy job. I just stared and stared, trying to count all of those handsome freckles. Then, he asked if there was anything else I wanted. I just whispered “Yes.” (Pauses, closes eyes in remembrance.) And then I grabbed him by the ears and MmmmmmmMM! (Pretends she’s grabbing and kissing him.) That was my first kiss. It was the most romantic moment of my life. Until the manager pulled me off of him." - Juniper

Tips on How to Memorize the Monologue

  • Readers should read the monologue several times and read the words aloud. Then, it is suggested to make a list of any questions while reading. All actors should thoroughly read the complete play that their monologue comes from, so ideally, readers should access a copy of ​Tomorrow's Wish. The complete script is available in print and online, and the paperback edition is available on Amazon.com and the Kindle Store.
  • Breaking the monologue into sections for memorization is recommended. This way, readers can work on memorizing one section at a time. As they memorize, it's important to keep in mind that Juniper is speaking to her cousin Megan. Readers should give some consideration to how Megan is reacting to Juniper's words.
  • Then, readers can return to the list of questions and either find the answers within the larger script or make up the answers. That way, readers can feel as thoroughly familiar with this character as possible.
  • Finally, readers should practice their monologue for anyone who will listen. They can deliver it aloud and as often as possible for an audience of one, or many, before performing it for an audition or within a performance.

About the Author

Wade Bradford is an author and English Teacher living and working in Washington and California. Bradford has earned his Masters in Literature from CSUN and has written over 35 plays, including CSI: Neverland. Bradford has also directed a production of the play The Little Prince in 2011.

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Your Citation
Bradford, Wade. "Comedic Female Monologue From the Three-Act Play "Tomorrow's Wish"." ThoughtCo, Sep. 18, 2017, thoughtco.com/comedic-female-monologue-from-tomorrows-wish-2713275. Bradford, Wade. (2017, September 18). Comedic Female Monologue From the Three-Act Play "Tomorrow's Wish". Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/comedic-female-monologue-from-tomorrows-wish-2713275 Bradford, Wade. "Comedic Female Monologue From the Three-Act Play "Tomorrow's Wish"." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/comedic-female-monologue-from-tomorrows-wish-2713275 (accessed January 16, 2018).