Confusing Verb Pairs

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Beare, Kenneth. "Confusing Verb Pairs." ThoughtCo, Nov. 30, 2015, thoughtco.com/confusing-verb-pairs-1212262. Beare, Kenneth. (2015, November 30). Confusing Verb Pairs. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/confusing-verb-pairs-1212262 Beare, Kenneth. "Confusing Verb Pairs." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/confusing-verb-pairs-1212262 (accessed October 18, 2017).
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Differences between Go and Come

Of all the verbs in English, the small differences between come and go can be confusing. Use 'go' to express the entire movement away from the current location of the speaker or listener to another location. For example:

Let's go to a film tonight.
Where did John go this afternoon?

Important Note: 'Go' is often used together with 'there' to indicate a location away from the speaker.

Verb Forms: Go - Went - Gone - Going

Use 'come' to express movement from a different location to the current location of the speaker or hearer. For example:

Would you like me to come over for lunch?
Please come to my party this coming Friday.

Important Note: 'Come' is often used together with 'here' to indicate a location close to the speaker.

Verb Forms: Come - Came - Come - Coming

02
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Differences Between Go and Get

Use 'get' to express a point of arrival or a destination. For example:

I got to work at seven thirty this morning.
It took us three hours to get to San Francisco.

Important Note: 'Get' is often used together with a specific point of time, a duration of time, or a specific destination.

Verb Forms: Get - Got - Gotten (got) - Getting

Use 'go' to express the journey, trip or experience in general. This includes both the journey to and from the destination. For example:

We went to Hawaii on vacation.
How often have you gone to that restaurant?

Important Note: 'Go' is also often used in general to speak about the entire journey, trip or experience, rather than the actual traveling to a location.

Verb Forms: Go - Went - Gone - Going

03
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Differences Between Bring, Take and Fetch

Use 'bring' to express movement towards or with a person that is at the current location. For example:

Could you bring me that newspaper, please?
Have you brought the documents along?

Important Note: 'Bring' is often used together with 'here' to indicate a location close to the speaker.

Verb Forms: Bring - Brought - Brought - Bringing

Use 'take' to express movement away from a person to a another location. For example:

We took our dog with us on vacation.
Do you take your briefcase with you to work every day?

Important Note: 'Take' is often used together with 'there' to indicate a location away from the speaker.

Verb Forms: Take - Took - Taken - Taking

Use 'fetch' to express the action of going to an object and bringing to back to the current location: For example:

Here Frankie! Go fetch the Ball!
Could you fetch the paper for me this morning?

Important Note: 'Fetch' is often used as a noun to speak about the game of running and getting a ball or other toy with a dog.

Verb Forms: Fetch - Fetched - Fetched - Fetching

04
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Differences Between See and Watch

Use 'see' to speak about the entire event or experience of watching a film, show, concert, etc. For example:

Have you seen the latest film by Spielberg?
We saw the new play at the Hello Theater last weekend.

Verb Forms: See - Saw - Seen

Use 'watch' to speak about the action of viewing something on TV, online, etc. For example:

Just a moment, I'm watching a video clip on YouTube.
Tom's watching TV, let me get him for you.

Verb Forms: Watch - Watched - Watched - Watching

05
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Differences Between Listen and Hear

Use 'listen' to speak about the action of paying attention to someone, or something such as music, a lecture, etc. For example:

I'm listening to the String Quartet No. 2 by Borodin.
Pay attention when you listen to him speak.

Verb Forms: Listen - Listened - Listened - Listening

Use 'hear' to speak about an entire event or completed action of listening. For example:

Did you hear Tom's speech last night?
I haven't heard her sing yet.

Verb Forms: Hear - Heard - Heard

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Differences Between Lend and Borrow

Use 'lend' to express the act of giving money or to another person for a period of time before expecting repayment of the original money (plus interest if a commercial loan). For example:

Can you lend me $20 until tomorrow?
The bank loaned her enough to purchase a new car.

Important Note: You can also 'lend' objects or things. In this case, the object is expected to be given back after a certain period of time.

Verb Forms: Lend - Lent - Lent - Lending

Use 'borrow' to express the act of taking money from another person or institution to pay back after a certain period of time. For example:

I borrowed $50 from a friend last week.
How much have you borrowed from the bank?

Important Note: You can also 'borrow' objects or things. In this case, the object is expected to be given back after a certain period of time.

Verb Forms: Borrow - Borrowed - Borrowed - Borrowing