Improve Clubhead Speed With Exercise That Targets Core

WinCo Foods Portland Open presented by Kraft - Round Three
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You hear the term "clubhead speed" quite a bit when golfers are referring to driving distance. The long-drive competitors pay a lot of attention to clubhead speed, as well as ball speed.

To improve clubhead speed and driving distance takes a specific approach, an approach you might not be aware of, or might not think about. The approach I'm talking about is core golf strength from a rotational standpoint.

Your core is the engine of the golf swing. The stronger you can get your core from a rotary standpoint, the higher your clubhead speed and distance can go. So many golfers think it's all about pounding more golf balls, swinging harder, or just even getting lighter shafts.

One golf exercise that can dramatically improve clubhead speed is what I call the Stationary Golf Swing with Medicine Ball. You can't get any more golf specific than this. You literally make a three-quarters golf swing with resistance as fast as you can go, but with total control and awareness of your golf swing mechanics.

Instructions

  • Assume your golf posture.
  • Hold medicine ball where you would normally hold the club.
  • Begin slowly rocking your shoulders back and forth as if swinging club.
  • Stay connected with the triangle of your shoulders, arms, and hands.
  • Slowly increase range until shoulders are almost to 90 degrees.
  • Repeat.

    Benefits To The Golf Swing

    • Greatly increases power output during the swing.
    • Develops golf-specific muscles directly involved with swing.
    • Promotes a stable base and more consistent ball striking.
    • Improves distance and accuracy due to overloading body with weight while simulating the golf swing.

    Your clubhead speed and driving distance will go up noticeably and quickly if you do this exercise consistently.

    You can do this exercise in the convenience of your home 2-3 times per week.

    Go slow with any new exercise you have not performed in the past. Check with your physician before undertaking any new physical training program.