Dormant Tree Identification Gallery

01
of 41

Dormant Tree Twigs

Dormant Tree Twigs
Photos of Dormant Winter Tree Twig Markers Dormant Tree Twigs. USFS Illustration

Photos of Dormant Winter Tree Markers

Identifying a dormant tree is not nearly as complicated as it might seem at first glance. Dormant tree identification will demand some dedication to apply the necessary practice to improve the skill of identifying trees without leaves.

I have compiled this gallery to augment your study of trees in winter to better identify tree species. Use this gallery and follow my instructions in A Beginning Guide to Winter Tree Identification. Using your powers of observation, you will find a pleasurable and beneficial way to enhance your skills as a naturalist - even in the dead of winter.

Learning to identify a tree without leaves can immediately make your growing season trees easier to name.

Vegetative structures on a tree are all important in its identification. The tree twig can tell you a lot about the kind of tree your are looking at.

The Terminal Bud:

There is a bud on the tip of every twig where growth occurs. It is often larger than the lateral buds and some can be absent. Trees easily identified by their terminal buds are yellow poplar (mitten or duckbilled shaped), dogwood (clove-shaped flower bud) and oak (clustered bud ends).

The Lateral Buds:

These are buds on each side of the branch. The trees easily identified by a lateral bud is beech (long, pointed scaled bud) and elm (buds off center over leaf scar).

The Leaf Scar:

This is a scar of leaf attachment. When the leaf drops, a scar is left just under the bud and it can be unique. The trees easily identified by its leaf scars are hickory (3-lobed), ash (shield shaped)and dogwood (leaf scar encircles the twig).

The Lenticel:

There are cork-filled pores on most trees that permit the living inner bark to breath. I use the narrow, long and light lenticels to partly identify just one species that can be tricky - black cherry.

The Bundle Scar:

You can see scars within the leaf scar that are a big help in identification. These visible dots or lines are cork filled ends of tubes that supply the leaf with water. The trees easily identified by its bundle or vein scars are ash (continuous bundle scars), maple (three bundle scars), and oaks (numerous scattered bundle scars).

The Stipule Scar:

This is the scar of a leaf-like attachment just off the leaf stem. Since all trees do not have stipules the presence or absence of stipule scars is often helpful in identifying a winter twig. The trees easily identified by its stipule scar is magnolia and yellow poplar.

The Pith:

The pith is the soft inner core of the twig. The trees easily identified by its pith are black walnut and butternut (both with chambered pith) and hickory (tan, 5-sided pith).

One bit of caution when using the above markers. You need to observe an average-looking and maturing tree and stay away from root sprouts, seedlings, suckers and juvenile growth. Rapidly growing young growth can (but not always) have atypical markers that will confuse the beginning identifier.

02
of 41

Opposite or Alternate Twigs and Leaves

Leaf and Twig Arrangements
Trees that have Opposite or Alternate Twigs, Limb and Leaf Arrangement Leaf and Twig Arrangements. USFS Illustration

Opposite or Alternate Twigs: Most tree twig keys start with the arrangement of leaf, limb and buds.

It is the primary first separation of the most common tree species. You can eliminate major blocks of trees just by observing its leaf and twig arrangement.

Alternate leaf attachments have one unique leaf at each leaf node and typically alternate direction along the stem. Opposite leaf attachments pair leaves at each node. Whorled leaf attachment is where three or more leaves attach at each point or node on the stem.

The opposites are maple, ash, dogwood, paulownia buckeye and boxelder (which is really a maple). The alternates are oak, hickory, yellow poplar, birch, beech, elm, cherry, sweetgum and sycamore.

03
of 41

Ash Twig and Fruit

Ash twig and fruit
Ash twig and fruit. Steve Nix

Ash is a deciduous tree in North America, the twigs are opposite and mostly pinnately-compound. The seeds, known as keys are a type of fruit known as a samara.

Ash (Fraxinus spp.) - Opposite Ranked

  • Shield-shaped leaf scar.
  • Tall, pointed bud.
  • No stupules.
  • Pitchfork-like limb tips.
  • Long and narrow clustered winged seed.
  • Continuous bundle scars inside leaf scar looks like "smiley face".
  • Identify the Ashes

    04
    of 41

    Ash Twigs

    Ash Twigs
    Dormant Pitchfork-like Ash Limb Tips Ash Twigs. Steve Nix

    Ash is a deciduous tree in North America, the twigs are opposite and mostly pinnately-compound. The seeds, known as keys are a type of fruit known as a samara.

    Ash (Fraxinus spp.) - Opposite Ranked

  • Shield-shaped leaf scar.
  • Tall, pointed bud.
  • No stupules.
  • Pitchfork-like limb tips.
  • Long and narrow clustered winged seed.
  • Continuous bundle scars inside leaf scar looks like "smiley face".
  • Identify the Ashes

    05
    of 41

    Ash twig

    Ash twig
    Ash twig. VT Dendrology

    Ash is a deciduous tree in North America, the twigs are opposite and mostly pinnately-compound. The seeds, known as keys are a type of fruit known as a samara.

    Ash (Fraxinus spp.) - Opposite Ranked

  • Shield-shaped leaf scar.
  • Tall, pointed bud.
  • No stupules.
  • Pitchfork-like limb tips.
  • Long and narrow clustered winged seed.
  • Continuous bundle scars inside leaf scar looks like "smiley face".
  • Identify the Ashes

    06
    of 41

    American Beech Bark

    157731734.jpg
    American beech has grey, smooth bark and often called the "initial tree". Old Growth Beech. AVTG E+/Getty images

    The leaves are finely toothed. Flowers are small catkins produced in spring. The fruit is a small, sharply 3-angled nut in pairs and in soft-spined husks.

    Beech (Fagus Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

    • Often confused with birch, hophornbeam and ironwood.
    • Has long narrow scaled buds (vs. short scaled buds on birch).
    • Has grey, smooth bark and often called the "initial tree".
    • Has no catkins.
    • Has spiny-husked nuts.
    • Often root suckers surround old trees.
    • "Human-like" looking roots on older trees.

    Identify the Beeches

    07
    of 41

    Beech Twig with Bud

    Beech twig
    A Beech Twig with a Long, Destinctive Bud Beech twig. VT Dendrology

    The leaves are finely toothed. Flowers are small catkins produced in spring. The fruit is a small, sharply 3-angled nut in pairs and in soft-spined husks.

    Beech (Fagus Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • Often confused with birch, hophornbeam and ironwood.
  • Has long narrow scaled buds (vs. short scaled buds on birch).
  • Has grey, smooth bark and often called the "initial tree".
  • Has no catkins.
  • Has spiny-husked nuts.
  • Often root suckers surround old trees.
  • "Human-like" looking roots on older trees.
  • Identify the Beeches

    08
    of 41

    River Birch Bark

    River Birch Bark
    Most Birch Tree have Exfoliating Bark River Birch Bark. Steve Nix

    The simple leaves are finely toothed. The fruit is a small samara. Birch differs from alder (Alnus) with a female catkin is not woody and will not fall apart.

    Birch (Betula Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • Often confused with beech, hophornbeam, alder and ironwood.
  • Has short, scaled buds (vs.# long, scaled buds on beech).
  • Male and female parts on same tree (male long catkins, female short cones).
  • Has no catkins.
  • Yellow birch has wintergreen tasting twig.
  • River birch has salmon colored exfoliating bark.
  • Paper (canoe) birch has creamy white thin bark separating into papery strips.
  • Identify the Birches

    09
    of 41

    River Birch Twig

    River birch twig
    River Birch Twig and Buds River birch twig. Steve Nix

    The simple leaves are finely toothed. The fruit is a small samara. Birch differs from alder (Alnus) with a female catkin is not woody and will not fall apart.

    Birch (Betula Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • Often confused with beech, hophornbeam, alder and ironwood.
  • Has short, scaled buds (vs.# long, scaled buds on beech).
  • Male and female parts on same tree (male long catkins, female short cones).
  • Has no catkins.
  • Yellow birch has wintergreen tasting twig.
  • River birch has salmon colored exfoliating bark.
  • Paper (canoe) birch has creamy white thin bark separating into papery strips.
  • Identify the Birches

    10
    of 41

    Birch Twig

    72609934.jpg
    Paper Birch Twig and Fruit. altrendo nature Altrendo/Getty images

    The simple leaves are finely toothed. The fruit is a small samara. Birch differs from alder (Alnus) with a female catkin is not woody and will not fall apart.

    Birch (Betula Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • Often confused with beech, hophornbeam, alder and ironwood.
  • Has short, scaled buds (vs.# long, scaled buds on beech).
  • Male and female parts on same tree (male long catkins, female short cones).
  • Has no catkins.
  • Yellow birch has wintergreen tasting twig.
  • River birch has salmon colored exfoliating bark.
  • Paper (canoe) birch has creamy white thin bark separating into papery strips.
  • Identify the Birches

    11
    of 41

    Black Cherry Bark

    Black cherry bark
    Black cherry bark. Steve Nix

    The leaves are simple with a serrated margin. The black fruit are somewhat astringent and bitter to eat.

    Cherry (Prunus Spp.)- Alternate Ranked

  • Has narrow corky and light, horizontal lenticels on young bark.
  • Bark breaks into dark plates and raised edges on older wood described as "burnt cornflakes".
  • Twig has "bitter almond" taste.
  • Bark is dark gey but both smooth and scaly with reddish-brown inner bark.
  • Identify the Cherry

    12
    of 41

    Cherry Twig

    Cherry twig
    Cherry twig. VT Dendrology

    Young cherry has narrow corky and light, horizontal lenticels on young bark.

    Cherry (Prunus Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • Has narrow corky and light, horizontal lenticels on young bark.
  • Bark breaks into dark plates and raised edges on older wood described as "burnt cornflakes".
  • Twig has "bitter almond" taste.
  • Bark is dark gey but both smooth and scaly with reddish-brown inner bark.
  • Identify the Cherry

    13
    of 41

    Dogwood Winter Bud

    dogwood_buds_sm.jpg
    Dogwood Winter Buds. Steve Nix image

    These flowering dogwood buds will burst into white flowers in Spring.

    Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida) - Opposite Ranked

    • Clove-shaped terminal flower bud.
    • "Square plated" bark.
    • Leaf scar encircles twig.
    • Leaf buds inconspicuous.
    • Remnant "raisin" seed.
    • Stipule scars are absent.

    Identify Flowering Dogwood

     

    14
    of 41

    Flowering Dogwood Bark

    Flowering Dogwood Bark
    Flowering Dogwood Bark Flowering Dogwood Bark. Steve Nix

    Flowering dogwood trunks are noteed for "Square plated" bark.

    Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida) - Opposite Ranked

    • Clove-shaped terminal flower bud.
    • "Square plated" bark.
    • Leaf scar encircles twig.
    • Leaf buds inconspicuous.
    • Remnant "raisin" seed.
    • Stipule scars are absent.

    Identify Flowering Dogwood

    15
    of 41

    Dogwood Twig, Flower Bud and Fruit

    Flowering dogwood twig
    Flowering dogwood twig. Steve Nix

    Slender twig, green or purple early turning gray later. The terminal flower buds are clove-shaped and vegetative buds resemble a dull cat claw.

    Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida) - Opposite Ranked

  • Clove-shaped terminal flower bud.
  • "Square plated" bark.
  • Leaf scar encircles twig.
  • Leaf buds inconspicuous.
  • Remnant "raisin" seed.
  • Stipule scars are absent.
  • Identify Flowering Dogwood

    16
    of 41

    Elm Bark

    Elm Bark with Summer Leaves
    Elm Bark with Summer Leaves Elm Bark with Summer Leaves. Steve Nix

    Here is rock elm with a yellow-tinted, plated bark.

    Elm (Ulmus Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • Has brown irregular bark that is tinged with red.
  • Has zig-zag twigs.
  • Bark acts like cork when pressed with finger nail (bounces back).
  • Bundle scars in three clusters.
  • Terminal bud is absent.
  • Identify the Elms

    17
    of 41

    Elm Twig

    Elm Twig
    Elm Twig. VT Dendrology

    Elm (Ulmus Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

    • Has brown irregular bark that is tinged with red.
    • Has zig-zag twigs.
    • Bark acts like cork when pressed with finger nail (bounces back).
    • Bundle scars in three clusters.
    • Terminal bud is absent.

    Identify the Elms

    18
    of 41

    American Elm Trunk and Bark

    200026535-001.jpg
    American Elm Trunk. Steve McCallister/the image bank/Getty images

    Here is American elm with irregular bark with a slight yellow tint.

    Elm (Ulmus Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

    • Has brown irregular bark that is tinged with red.
    • Has zig-zag twigs.
    • Bark acts like cork when pressed with finger nail (bounces back).
    • Bundle scars in three clusters.
    • Terminal bud is absent.

    Identify the Elms

     

    19
    of 41

    Hackberry Bark

    Hackberry Bark
    Hackberry Bark Hackberry Bark. Steve Nix

    Hackberry bark is smooth and gray-brown when young, soon developing corky, individual "warts". This bark structure is a very good identification marker.

    Hackberry Bark

    Hackberry (Celtis Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • Pith is often chambered at the nodes..
  • Corky and warty bark, later turning to corky ridges.
  • Round dried drupes (seed) may be found under tree.
  • Identify Hackberry

    20
    of 41

    Shagbark Hickory

    Shagbark Hickory
    Shagbark Hickory. Steve Nix

    Hickories are deciduous trees with pinnately compound leaves and large with hickory nuts. Remnants of these leaves and nuts will be found in dormancy.

    Hickory (Carya spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • 5-sided pith.
  • Variable bark not helpful except for loose, flaky shagbark hickory.
  • Nuts and husks under tree.
  • Stout twigs with large terminal bud.
  • Tan, 5-angled pith.
  • Large heart-shaped to 3-lobed leaf scar.
  • Identify the Hickories

    21
    of 41

    Pecan Bark

    Pecan Bark
    Pecan Bark. Steve Nix

    Pecan is a member of the hickory family. It produces a very popular nut produced in commercial orchards.

    Pecan (Carya spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • 5-sided pith.
  • Variable bark not helpful except for loose, flaky shagbark hickory.
  • Nuts and husks under tree.
  • Stout twigs with large terminal bud.
  • Tan, 5-angled pith.
  • Large heart-shaped to 3-lobed leaf scar.
  • Identify the Hickories

    22
    of 41

    Magnolia Bark

    Magnolia Bark
    Magnolia Bark. Steve Nix

    Magnolia bark is typically brown to gray, thin, smooth/lenticellate when young. Close plates or scales appear as it ages.

    Magnolia (Magnolia Spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • Stout twig with white to rusty matted hairs on leaf bottom.
  • Leaf is Alternate, simple, evergreen, oval and relatively large.
  • Silky white to rusty red terminal bud.
  • Identify the Magnolias

    23
    of 41

    Maple Twig

    Maple twig
    Maple twig. VT Dendrology

    Maples are distinguished by opposite leaf and twig arrangement. The distinctive fruit are called samaras or "maple keys".

    Maple (Acer spp.) - Opposite Ranked

  • Paired winged key seeds.
  • Red buds and new red stems on red maple.
  • Bark is generally gray but variable in form.
  • Terminal bud is is egg-shaped and slightly larger than lateral buds.
  • Stipule scars absent.
  • Identify the Maples

    24
    of 41

    Silver Maple Bark

    Silver Maple Bark
    Silver Maple Bark. Steve Nix

    Silver maple bark is light gray and smooth when young, but breaks up into long thin strips, loose at ends when older.

    Maple (Acer spp.) - Opposite Ranked

  • Paired winged key seeds.
  • Red buds and new red stems on red maple.
  • Bark is generally gray but variable in form.
  • Terminal bud is is egg-shaped and slightly larger than lateral buds.
  • Stipule scars absent.
  • Identify the Maples

    25
    of 41

    Red Maple Bark

    Red Maple Bark
    Red Maple Bark. Steve Nix

    On young red maple trees you see smooth and light gray. With age bark becomes darker and breaks up into long, fine scaly plates.

    Maple (Acer spp.) - Opposite Ranked

  • Paired winged key seeds.
  • Red buds and new red stems on red maple.
  • Bark is generally gray but variable in form.
  • Terminal bud is is egg-shaped and slightly larger than lateral buds.
  • Stipule scars absent.
  • Identify the Maples

    26
    of 41

    Red Maple Seed Key

    Red maple has beautiful red seed, sometimes called a key.

    Maple (Acer spp.) - Opposite Ranked

  • Paired winged key seeds.
  • Red buds and new red stems on red maple.
  • Bark is generally gray but variable in form.
  • Terminal bud is is egg-shaped and slightly larger than lateral buds.
  • Stipule scars absent.
  • Identify the Maples

    27
    of 41

    Bark of an Older Red Maple

    Red Maple Bark and Trunk
    Red Maple Bark and Trunk. Steve Nix

    On young red maple trees you see smooth and light gray. With age bark becomes darker and breaks up into long, fine scaly plates.

    Maple (Acer spp.) - Opposite Ranked

  • Paired winged key seeds.
  • Red buds and new red stems on red maple.
  • Bark is generally gray but variable in form.
  • Terminal bud is is egg-shaped and slightly larger than lateral buds.
  • Stipule scars absent.
  • Identify the Maples

    28
    of 41

    Water Oak Bark

    Water Oak Bark
    Water Oak Bark Water Oak Bark. Steve Nix

    Many oaks including water oak have variable bark forms and sometimes not helpful for identification alone.

    Oak (Quercus spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • 5-sided pith.
  • Variable bark not very helpful.
  • Clustered buds at tip of twig.
  • Persistent leaves on live and water oak.
  • Slightly raised, semi-circular leaf scars.
  • Numerous bundle scars.
  • Acorns persistent on twigs or under the tree.
  • Numerous bundle scars.
  • Identify the Oaks

    29
    of 41

    Cherry Bark Oak Acorn

    Cherry Bark Oak Acorn
    Cherry Bark Oak Acorn.

    All oaks have acorns. The nutty acorn fruit can persist on limbs, can be found under the tree and is an excellent identifier.

    Oak (Quercus spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • 5-sided pith.
  • Variable bark not very helpful.
  • Clustered buds at tip of twig.
  • Persistent leaves on live and water oak.
  • Slightly raised, semi-circular leaf scars.
  • Numerous bundle scars.
  • Acorns persistent on twigs or under the tree.
  • Numerous bundle scars.
  • Identify the Oaks

    30
    of 41

    Persistent oak twig

    Persistent oak twig
    Persistent oak twig. Steve Nix

    Certain oaks, including water oak and live oak, are persistent to semi-evergreen.

    Oak (Quercus spp.) - Alternate Ranked

  • 5-sided pith.
  • Variable bark not very helpful.
  • Clustered buds at tip of twig.
  • Persistent leaves on live and water oak.
  • Slightly raised, semi-circular leaf scars.
  • Numerous bundle scars.
  • Acorns persistent on twigs or under the tree.
  • Numerous bundle scars.
  • Identify the Oaks

    31
    of 41

    Persimmon Bark

    Persimmon Bark
    Persimmon Bark Persimmon Bark. Steve Nix

    Persimmon bark is deeply furrowed into small square scaly plates.

    Persimmon (Diospyros virginiana) - Alternate Ranked

  • Small square scaly plated bark.
  • Fleshy rounded fruit may be found under the tree.
  • Twigs are slightly zig-zag and often hairy.
  • Identify Persimmon

    32
    of 41

    Red Cedar Bark

    Red Cedar Bark
    Red Cedar Bark. Steve Nix
    33
    of 41

    Redbud Bark

    Redbud Bark
    Redbud Bark Redbud Bark. Steve Nix

    Eastern Redbud (Cercis canadensis) - Alternate Ranked

  • Smooth dark gray/brown bark furrowing with age.
  • Flat and long narrow pods under tree.
  • Twigs are brown, slender and angled.
  • Identify Redbud

    34
    of 41

    Redbud Flowers and Remnant Fruit

    Redbud Flowers and Remnant Fruit
    Redbud Flowers and Remnant Fruit Redbud Flowers and Remnant Fruit. Steve Nix

    Eastern Redbud (Cercis canadensis) - Alternate Ranked

  • Smooth dark gray/brown bark furrowing with age.
  • Flat and long narrow pods under tree.
  • Twigs are brown, slender and angled.
  • Identify Redbud

    35
    of 41

    Sweetgum Bark

    Sweetgum Bark
    Sweetgum Bark Sweetgum Bark. Steve Nix

    Sweetgum bark is gray-brown with irregular furrows and rough rounded ridges. Note the water sprout on the bole in the photo.

    Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) - Alternate Ranked

  • Corky outgrowth on twig bark.
  • Spiny "gumballs" on long stalk.
  • Green/orange-brown shiny bud scales.
  • Terminal bud sticky.
  • Identify Sweetgum

    36
    of 41

    Sweetgum balls

    Sweetgum balls
    Spikey fruit called a Gumball. Sweetgum balls. Steve Nix

    Sweetgum leaves are palmately lobed with a long and broad petiole or stem. The compound fruit, commonly called a "gumball" or "birball", is a spikey ball.

    Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) - Alternate Ranked

  • Corky outgrowth on twig bark.
  • Spiny "gumballs" on long stalk.
  • Green/orange-brown shiny bud scales.
  • Terminal bud sticky.
  • Identify Sweetgum

    37
    of 41

    Sycamore fruit balls

    Sycamore fruit balls
    Sycamore fruit balls.

    Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) - Alternate Ranked

  • Zig-zag stout twigs.
  • Mottled "camouflage" exfoliating (peeling) bark (green, white, tan).
  • Spherical multiple achenes with long stalks (fruit balls).
  • Numerous raised bundle scars.
  • leaf scar nearly surrounds the bud.
  • Buds are large and cone-shaped.
  • Identify Sycamore

    38
    of 41

    Old Sycamore Bark

    Old Sycamore Bark
    Old Sycamore Bark. Steve Nix

    Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) - Alternate Ranked

    • Zig-zag stout twigs.
    • Mottled "camouflage" exfoliating (peeling) bark (green, white, tan).
    • Spherical multiple achenes with long stalks (fruit balls).
    • Numerous raised bundle scars.
    • leaf scar nearly surrounds the bud.
    • Buds are large and cone-shaped.

    Identify Sycamore

    39
    of 41

    Sycamore and ash

    Sycamore and ash - alternate and opposite
    Opposite and Alternate Twigs Sycamore and ash - alternate and opposite. Steve Nix

    Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) - Alternate Ranked

    • Zig-zag stout twigs.
    • Mottled "camouflage" exfoliating (peeling) bark (green, white, tan).
    • Spherical multiple achenes with long stalks (fruit balls).
    • Numerous raised bundle scars.
    • leaf scar nearly surrounds the bud.
    • Buds are large and cone-shaped.

     

    40
    of 41

    Yellow Poplar Bark

    Yellow Poplar Bark
    Yellow Poplar Bark Yellow Poplar Bark. Steve Nix

    Yellow poplar bark is an easy identification marker. Look at the gray-green bark with unique "inverted V" on limb to trunk connections.

    Yellow Poplar (Lireodendron tulipifera) - Alternate Ranked

  • "Duck bill" or "mitten" looking buds.
  • Large stipule scars encircling the twig.
  • Cone-like aggregate of samaras.
  • Buds "fuzzy".
  • Unique "inverted V" on limb to trunk connection.
  • Gray-green bark with light furrows.
  • Pith often divided by partitions of stone cells.
  • Identify Yellow Poplar

    41
    of 41

    Yellow poplar twig

    Yellow poplar twig
    Yellow poplar twig. Steve Nix

    Yellow poplar has a very interesting twig. Look at the "duck bill" or "mitten" shaped buds.

    Yellow Poplar (Lireodendron tulipifera) - Alternate Ranked

  • "Duck bill" or "mitten" looking buds.
  • Large stipule scars encircling the twig.
  • Cone-like aggregate of samaras.
  • Buds "fuzzy".
  • Unique "inverted V" on limb to trunk connection.
  • Gray-green bark with light furrows.
  • Pith often divided by partitions of stone cells.
  • Identify Yellow Poplar

    Format
    mla apa chicago
    Your Citation
    Nix, Steve. "Dormant Tree Identification Gallery." ThoughtCo, Jan. 13, 2017, thoughtco.com/dormant-tree-identification-gallery-4122781. Nix, Steve. (2017, January 13). Dormant Tree Identification Gallery. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/dormant-tree-identification-gallery-4122781 Nix, Steve. "Dormant Tree Identification Gallery." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/dormant-tree-identification-gallery-4122781 (accessed November 25, 2017).