The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times

01
of 12
The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters, 1797-99

Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York; used with permission
Francisco de Goya (Spanish, 1746-1828) Francisco de Goya (Spanish, 1746-1828). The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters from the illustrated book Los Caprichos, 1797-99. Aquatint and etching. Plate 8 7/16 x 5 15/16 in. (21.4 x 15.1 cm). The Louis E. Stern Collection. Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York

On View March 10-September 6, 2010 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York


As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010. Please enjoy the selected images that follow, courtesy of MoMA.


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

02
of 12
Mercury after Pigalle, ca. 1890

Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York; used with permission
Paul Cézanne (French, 1839-1906) Paul Cézanne (French, 1839-1906). Mercury after Pigalle, ca. 1890. Pencil on paper. 15 x 11 in. (38.1 x 27.9 cm). The Joan and Lester Avnet Fund. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

03
of 12
The Centaur, 1885-1900

Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York; used with permission
Odilon Redon (French, 1840-1916) Odilon Redon (French, 1840-1916). The Centaur, 1885-1900. Pastel with graphite on blue paper altered to a blue-gray tone, mounted on board. 28 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. (72.4 x 49.5 cm). Gift of Dian Woodner. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

04
of 12
Bacchic Dance, 1906

© 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
André Derain (French, 1880-1954) André Derain (French, 1880-1954). Bacchic Dance, 1906. Watercolor and pencil on paper. 19 1/2 x 25 1/2 in. (49.5 x 64.8 cm). Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

05
of 12
Caryatid, 1914

Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York; used with permission
Amedeo Modigliani (Italian, 1884-1920) Amedeo Modigliani (Italian, 1884-1920). Caryatid, 1914. Gouache and ink on paper. 22 3/4 x 18 1/2 in. (57.8 x 47.0 cm). Bequest of Mrs. Harriet H. Jonas. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

06
of 12
Maquette for the cover of the journal "Minotaure," 1933

© 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Maquette for the cover of the journal "Minotaure," 1933. Assemblage. 19 1/8 x 16 1/8 in. (48.5 x 41.0 cm). Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Alexandre P. Rosenberg. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


In this work, assemblage means, "...corrugated cardboard, metal foil, ribbons, printed paper, paper doily, artificial plant, tacks, and pencil on paper mounted on wood with charcoal additions."

About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

07
of 12
The Rape of Europa IV, 1941

Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York; used with permission
Jacques Lipchitz (American, b. Lithuania, 1891-1973) Jacques Lipchitz (American, b. Lithuania, 1891-1973). The Rape of Europa IV, 1941. Ink, red chalk, gouache, and pencil on paper. 26 x 20 in. (66 x 51 cm). Purchase. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

08
of 12
Satan, 1942

© 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Wifredo Lam (Cuban, 1902-1982) Wifredo Lam (Cuban, 1902-1982). Satan, 1942. Gouache on paper. 41 7/8 x 34 in. (106.4 x 86.4 cm). Inter-American Fund. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

09
of 12
The Great Mutation, 1942

© 2010 Estate of Yves Tanguy/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Yves Tanguy (American, b. France, 1900-1955) Yves Tanguy (American, b. France, 1900-1955). The Great Mutation, 1942. Cut-and-pasted painted paper, gouache, and pencil on paper. 11 3/8 x 8 5/8 in. (29.1 x 21.9 cm). Kay Sage Tanguy Bequest. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2010 Estate of Yves Tanguy / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

10
of 12
Archaic Idol, 1945

© 2000 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko/Artists Rights Society (ARS); used with permission
Mark Rothko (American, b. Latvia, 1903-1970) Mark Rothko (American, b. Latvia, 1903-1970). Archaic Idol, 1945. Ink and gouache on paper. 21 7/8 x 30 in. (55.6 x 76.2 cm). The Joan and Lester Avnet Collection. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2000 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

11
of 12
Untitled (Roy Rogers), ca. 1948

© 2010 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; used with permission
Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987) Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987). Untitled (Roy Rogers), ca. 1948. Pencil on paper. 11 x 8 1/2 in. (28 x 22 cm). Chief Curator Discretionary Fund. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2010 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.

12
of 12
One Hundred Lavish Months of Bushwhack, 2004

© 2010 Wangechi Mutu; used with permission of The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Wangechi Mutu (Kenyan, b. 1972) Wangechi Mutu (Kenyan, b. 1972). One Hundred Lavish Months of Bushwhack, 2004. Cut-and-pasted printed paper with watercolor, synthetic polymer paint, and pressure-sensitive stickers on transparentized paper. Fund for the Twenty-First Century. The Museum of Modern Art, New York / © 2010 Wangechi Mutu


About the Show:

As The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times amply illustrates, the time-honored artistic theme of mythology is alive and well in the 21st-century. In fact, a "ghost in the machine" argument could be made that we now have even more parallels between modern technology and mythology.

Each of the 50+ works on paper, created between 1797 and 2008, in this exhibition directly or indirectly hearkens to Classical mythology for its inspiration. Some, as with Pablo Picasso's "Minotaure" cover (1933), are obvious, while others take more fantastic and Surrealistic routes. Either way, this show will make you think, delight your eye and, possibly, view some of your favorite legendary artists in a new, truly "legendary" light.

The Modern Myth: Drawing Mythologies in Modern Times is on view at The Paul J. Sachs Drawings Galleries, third floor, The Museum of Modern Art, New York from March 10 through September 6, 2010.