Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth

01
of 19
The Boulevard des Capucines, 1873

© Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri; used with permission
Claude Monet (French, 1840-1926) Claude Monet (French, 1840-1926). The Boulevard des Capucines, 1873. Oil on canvas. 80.3 x 60.3 cm (31 5/8 x 23 3/4 in.). Purchase, The Kenneth A. and Helen F. Spencer Foundation Acquisition Fund, F72-35. © Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri

On View February 14-April 26, 2009 at The Art Institute of Chicago

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel. Miss it and you may have cause to ... scream.
 


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

02
of 19
By Lamplight, 1890

© The Rasmus Meyer Collection, The Bergen Art Museum; used with permission
Harriet Backer (Norwegian, 1845-1932) Harriet Backer (Norwegian, 1845-1932). By Lamplight, 1890. Oil on canvas. 64.7 x 66.5 cm (25 1/2 x 26 1/8 in.). RMS.M.20. © The Rasmus Meyer Collection, The Bergen Art Museum


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

03
of 19
A Funeral, 1891

© Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen; used with permission
Anna Ancher (Danish, 1859-1935) Anna Ancher (Danish, 1859-1935). A Funeral, 1891. Oil on canvas. 103.5 x 124.5 cm (40 3/4 x 49 in.). KMS 1433. © Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

04
of 19
Rue de Rivoli, 1891

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Rue de Rivoli, 1891. Oil on canvas. 81 x 65.1 cm (31 7/8 x 25 5/8 in.). Gift of Rudolf Serkin. Harvard Art Museums, Fogg Art Museum. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized, and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.

05
of 19
Evening on Karl Johan, 1892

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Evening on Karl Johan, 1892. Oil on canvas. 84.5 x 121 cm (33 1/4 x 47 5/8 in.). RMS.M.245. The Rasmus Meyer Collection, The Bergen Art Museum. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

06
of 19
Kiss by the Window, 1892


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

07
of 19
Death in the Sickroom, 1893

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Death in the Sickroom, 1893. Oil on canvas. 134.5 x 160 cm (53 x 63 in.). MMM 418. Munch Museum, Oslo. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

08
of 19
The Girl by the Window, 1893

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). The Girl by the Window, 1893. Oil on canvas. 96.5 x 65.4 cm (38 x 25 3/4 in.). Searle Family Trust and Goldabelle McComb Finn endowments; Charles H. and Mary F. S. Worcester Collection. The Art Institute of Chicago. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

09
of 19
Starry Night, 1893

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Starry Night, 1893. Oil on canvas. 108.5 x 120.5 cm (42 3/4 x 47 1/2 in.). G 1179. Von der Heydt Museum, Wuppertal. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

10
of 19
Summer Night's Dream: The Voice, 1893

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Summer Night's Dream: The Voice, 1893. Oil on canvas. 87.9 x 108 cm (34 5/8 x 42 1/2 in.). Ernest Wadsworth Longfellow Fund, 59.301. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

11
of 19
Sin, ca. 1893

© Gallery Katharina Büttiker, Art Nouveau - Art Deco, Zurich; used with permission
Franz von Stuck (German, 1863-1928) Franz von Stuck (German, 1863-1928). Sin, ca. 1893. Oil on canvas. 88 x 53.3 cm (34 5/8 x 21 in.). © Gallery Katharina Büttiker, Art Nouveau - Art Deco, Zurich


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

12
of 19
Anxiety, 1894

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Anxiety, 1894. Oil on canvas. 94 x 73 cm (37 x 28 3/4 in.). MMM 515. Munch Museum, Oslo. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

13
of 19
Melancholy, 1894/96

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Melancholy, 1894/96. Oil on canvas. 81 x 100.5 cm (31 7/8 x 39 5/8 in.). RMS.M.249. The Rasmus Meyer Collection, The Bergen Art Museum. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

14
of 19
Moonlight, 1895

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Moonlight, 1895. Oil on canvas. 93 x 110 cm (36 5/8 x 43 1/4 in.). NG.M.02815. The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

15
of 19
Self-Portrait with Cigarette, 1895

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Self-Portrait with Cigarette, 1895. Oil on canvas. 110.5 x 85.5 cm (43 1/2 x 33 5/8 in.). NG.M.00470. The National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

16
of 19
The Scream, 1895

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). The Scream, 1895. Lithograph in black ink on cream card. Image: 35.5 x 25.3 cm (14 x 10 in.); Sheet: 51 x 38.5 cm (20 x 15 1/8 in.). Clarence Buckingham Collection. The Art Institute of Chicago. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

17
of 19
Madonna, 1895

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Madonna, 1895. Lithograph with watercolor additions. Image: 60.3 x 44 cm (23 3/4 x 17 3/8 in.); Sheet: 60.7 x 44.4 cm (23 7/8 x 17 1/2 in.). Print and Drawing Department Purchase Fund. The Art Institute of Chicago. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Additions in brush and red, green, blue, black, and yellow watercolor on gray-blue wove paper (discolored to gray-green), laid on heavyweight white wove paper.


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

18
of 19
The Sick Child, 1896

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). The Sick Child, 1896. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 118.5 cm (47 7/8 x 46 5/8 in.). GKM 975. Göteborg Museum of Art, Göteborg, Sweden. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.
 

19
of 19
Golgotha, 1900

© 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group; used with permission
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944) Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863-1944). Golgotha, 1900. Oil on canvas. 80 x 120 cm (31 1/2 x 47 1/4 in.). MMM 36. Munch Museum, Oslo. © 2008 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY


About the Show:

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth brings together approximately 150 rarely seen works, including 75 paintings and 75 works on paper by Munch and contemporary artists including James Ensor, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Max Klinger, and Claude Monet. Viewed in context, and in proximity to concurrent artistic trends, we are confronted with the truth that Edvard Munch wasn't nearly as dark and tormented as many of us have supposed. Rather, he was more shrewd than agonized and keenly aware of that which would sell. Munch played the neurotic card adeptly in the course of promoting his work, though subject to relatively only as much heartbreak and sorrow as are most humans. This aspect of the exhibition is truly revelatory.

Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth was organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, is exclusive to this sole venue and will not travel.