Top 9 Pieces of Equipment for Scenario Games

Scenario games are large paintball games that can involve hundreds or even thousands of people and last all day or for multiple days. Packing for one, though, doesn't have to be hard. Learn what you need to bring to make the most of your time.

01
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Mask

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Your mask is the most important thing to bring on a field. Without a gun you can still act as commander or specialize in running for the flag, but without a mask, you're stuck sitting in the car. Scenario games typically last an entire day or longer, so make sure you get a mask that is comfortable and fits you well. A $10 mask might feel fine when you try it on in the store, but realistically, after twelve hours it's not going to feel so great.

Make sure you know how to clean a mask well before you go and learn how to keep your mask from fogging as you will be wearing it for a very long time.

02
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Gun

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You should be intimately familiar and comfortable with the parts and operation of your gun before a scenario game. Make sure you know how to identify and fix basic problems before you go, and make sure you bring along the proper wrenches, screw drivers, and o-rings you'll need to work on your gun if there's a problem. Start the day with a clean, oiled, and fully functioning gun so that you don't spend your day fixing things in the dead zone. If possible, bring a backup gun along in case of a large problem.

03
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Pod Pack/Vest and Pods

During a typical scenario game, reinsertions keep players from leaving the playing field for hours on end. During that time, you typically will want to shoot more paint than your hopper holds. A pod pack or vest is an ideal piece of equipment to carry extra paint. Pods typically hold 100 or 140 rounds of paint, and a few filled pods will keep you on the field and in the game. Pod packs and vests can hold anywhere from 2 to more than 10 pods, so figure out how much paint you shoot, and be prepared to refill. Buy from Amazon »

04
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Copyright 2007 David Muhlestein licensed to About.com

Scenario games usually take place in the woods, and a little bit of natural color in your attire will go a long way to helping you blend in. It's not necessary to buy anything new or even wear camouflage, but don't show up to a scenario game wearing a white t-shirt and khaki pants.

05
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Two-way Radio

Scenario games typically involve over a hundred people and can stretch out over many acres. A portable radio keeps you in contact with your commander and other squadrons from your team. A radio can help you simply know what your next objective is or even coordinate intricate attacks from opposite sides of the field. Buy from Amazon »

06
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Water Bottle

The last thing on your mind during an intense fire fight is how to keep your body from becoming dehydrated, but keeping your body full of fluids should be a priority during a day of scenario play. Whenever you leave the field be sure to drink as much as you can and try to keep your urine clear. Many people elect to bring a water bottle onto the field with them in their pod pack or vest.

Remember part of safety involves keeping your body healthy and hydrated.

07
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Map

It's difficult to become familiar with a huge multi-acre field during battle, and often, you can't even see the other side of the field. A simple map with bases, flags, and other objective points clearly marked can make all the difference between a successful mission and a quick trip to the dead zone. A free satellite map that you can print from the Internet is usually sufficient.

08
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Grenades

Grenades are ideal during close quarters combat or when the enemy is hid behind a bunker or in a pill box. They are a very effective tool to eliminate large groups of the enemy and very simple to use. During a scenario game you will most likely come into some situation where a grenade will be useful, so it's advisable to carry at least one with you. Buy from Amazon »

09
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Comfortable Shoes

During a day on the field you will walk a lot. Comfortable shoes will do wonders to help your feet the day after. Boots are nice, but it's better to show up with a pair of broken-in tennis shoes than to risk your feet in any untested footwear.