Eugenie Bouchard Photos: Picture Gallery of Strokes

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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #1: Forehand Backswing

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Forehand Backswing
Graham Denholm / Getty Images

In this photo, Eugenie Bouchard shows us a beautiful example of preparation for a topspin forehand hit with an essentially square stance. Eugenie's strong knee bend loads the powerful muscles in her legs to drive upward and forward with her swing, contributing to her pace and spin. The forward extension of her left arm keeps her balanced and may help her subconsciously to remember to reach back with her right and thereby enhance her power. Eugenie's eyes are nicely focused on the ball. An instant after this moment, her racquet will begin to drop below the ball so that she can brush up its back to produce topspin. As her racquet approaches the ball, the downward tilt of its face will resolve toward the vertical position in which it will meet the ball.

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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #2: Forehand Point of Contact

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Forehand Point of Contact
Koji Watanabe / Getty Images

If Eugenie's face and muscles don't convince you of how hard she's hitting her forehand in this photo, just look at the flattened ball. Eugenie's relatively forward point of contact is standard for a high ball met with her roughly Semi-Western grip.

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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #3: Forehand Follow-Through

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Forehand Follow-Through
Elsa / Getty Images
Bouchard shows us a classic follow-through for an aggressive, square-stance forehand, as her racquet hand ends up near the height of her ear, and her weight is coming down onto her front foot after the powerful leg drive that accompanied her swing lifted her off the ground.
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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #4: Backswing for Two-Handed Backhand

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Backswing for Two-Handed Backhand
Clive Brunskill / Getty Images

Eugenie Bouchard's perfectly square stance for this two-handed backhand is classic, but her racquet position is somewhat unusual. Most players would lay the racquet back a little farther and drop its head less. Eugenie's backswing enhances topspin more than power. The Semi-Western position of her left hand further enhances her ability to produce topspin, and it too is somewhat unusual, as most players have the left closer to an Eastern forehand position for a two-handed backhand.

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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #5: Backhand Point of Contact

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Backhand Point of Contact
Graham Denholm / Getty Images

Eugenie meets her two-handed backhand at a more comfortable distance from her body than many of her peers, who look somewhat cramped. Better extension creates better leverage and thus more power, perhaps resulting in Eugenie using a backswing and grip that are oriented toward topspin; power and topspin to control it are an ideal combination.

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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #6: Backhand Follow-Through

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Backhand Follow-Through
Julian Finney / Getty Images

Eugenie's two-handed follow-through brings the racquet to roughly a median position among advanced follow-throughs, which range from well in front of the body to wrapped around the back. As on her forehand follow-through, her main hitting hand (the left in this case) is at roughly the height of her ear, and she has transferred her weight powerfully onto her front foot.

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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #7: Serve Toss

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Serve Toss
Renee McKay / Getty Images
In this photo, Eugenie Bouchard shows us how to execute a great ball toss. She has opened her tossing hand like a big flower, thus keeping any of her fingers from pushing the ball off direction, and she reaches after the ball, which helps her to avoid releasing the ball or dropping her left shoulder too early.
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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #8: Knee Bend for Serve

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Knee Bend for Serve
Matt King / Getty Images
A great serve starts with a powerful leg drive, and Eugenie Bouchard loads her leg muscles well here with her strong knee bend. She continues to reach up after the ball with her left arm, thus keeping her right shoulder as low as possible to give it and her right arm more room to travel upward with her swing and arching her core so that its muscles too can contribute to the upward drive that creates power and spin.
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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #9: Elbow Up, Racquet Down on Serve

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Elbow Up, Racquet Down on Serve
Michael Dodge / Getty Images
This photo perfectly captures the elbow-up, racquet-down position that precedes the upward strike on all top-level serves. Note the 90-degree angle at Eugenie's elbow and between her racquet and her forearm. The straightening of those angles will be the essence of her swing.
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Eugenie Bouchard Photo #10: Serve Point of Contact

Photo of Eugenie Bouchard - Serve Point of Contact
Quinn Rooney / Getty Images

This is where all of Eugenie's excellent preparation for the serve comes together. She has placed the toss in a perfect position for a powerful first serve, roughly a foot in front of and to the right of her head. Her leg drive has lifted her well off the ground, both initiating the kinetic chain that produces racquet-head speed and giving her a higher point of contact that improves her angle over the net. The straightening of her elbow has whipped her wrist and racquet upward at a tremendous speed. Eugenie's racquet looks as if it will strike the ball much too close to edge-first to send it in the right direction, but her relaxed forearm is in the midst of naturally pronating so that her strings will turn much more forward in the instant remaining before contact. She will strike the ball with the mixture of topspin and sidespin that is standard for a first serve.