Get In the Hole! Every Ace in US Open History

Plus the first, the longest and shortest US Open aces, and more trivia

Golfer Tom Weiskopf during the 1982 US Open
Tom Weiskopf during the 1982 US Open, where he made one of his two tournament holes-in-one. That sweater is aces, too. Al Kooistra/WireImage/Getty Images

There have been 44 U.S. Open aces in the history of this major championship, which goes back to 1895. That means a hole-in-one happens in, roughly, a third of U.S. Opens played.

Every one of those aces is listed below. But before we get there, let's dig into the names and numbers a little bit and see what nuggets of trivia we can uncover.

Who Made the First US Open Ace?

Jack Hobens is little-known today, but his name will forever be in the golf history books: He made the first known U.S. Open ace.

A Scotsman by birth, Hobens entered the 1899 British Open, then emigrated to the United States in 1900 and took a club job in New Jersey.

Hobens entered the U.S. Open several times, and finished as high as fourth (in both 1907 and 1909). And it was in the 1907 U.S. Open that he holed out on the 147-yard 10th hole at Philadelphia Cricket Club during the second round. The first known hole-in-one at the U.S. Open.

Hobens later was part of an organizing committee that helped in the formation of the PGA of America.

Has Any Golfer Scored More Than One US Open Ace?

Yes, there is one golfer with two holes-in-one during the U.S. Open: Tom Weiskopf. Weiskopf scored an ace at the 1978 Open, then got another one in 1982.

Amateur Aces at the US Open

Dick Chapman in 1950, Billy Kuntz in 1956 and Spencer Levin in 2004 all notched U.S. Open holes-in-one playing the tournament as amtaeurs.

Does the name Dick Chapman mean anything to you?

If you're a student of golf history, it does. Chapman was a winner of the U.S. Amateur and British Amateur championships and played The Masters 19 times.

He also invented the golf format that we call Chapman System or Pinehurst System today.

Father-and-Son Holes-in-One

Yes, a father-and-son pair of golfers both made holes-in-one during U.S. Open play.

And the dad is a hall-of-famer.

In 1982, Johnny Miller made an ace at Pebble Beach. Twenty years later, at Bethpage Black, Andy Miller added the family's second U.S. Open ace.

Longest and Shortest US Open Aces

The shortest hole-in-one recorded at the USGA's national open was 108 yards. Todd Fischer got it in 2000. And the longest: the 229-yard hole-out by Shawn Stefani in 2013.

(Note that yardage is not available for all the aces listed below.)

Four Holes-in-One in the Same Day

Not only did four golfers ace the same hole on the same day at the 1989 U.S. Open, they all used the same club ... and the aces all happened within two hours of each other. Between 8:15 a.m. and 10:15 a.m., on Oak Hill Country Club's No. 6 hole, Drew Weaver, Mark Weibe, Jerry Pate and Nick Price all holed out for 1s.

All four golfers used a 7-iron on the downhill, 159-yard hole. Not only did the feat establish a tournament record for most aces in one round, but also for most aces in a single U.S. Open. And that record still stands. (Today, there is a plaque commemorating the event on the teeing ground.)

Has An Acer Ever Gone On to Win the Tournament?

No. A handful of U.S. Open champions have made a hole-in-one in the Open, but not in the year they won the tournament.

No golfer has yet scored an aced during a U.S. Open and gone on to win that same tournament.

All the US Open Aces in Tournament History

Here is the list of all known golfers who've made holes-in-one during a U.S. Open tournament:

  • Jack Hobens, 147-yard 10th hole, second round, Philadelphia Cricket Club (St. Martin’s Course), Chestnut Hill, Pa., 1907
  • Eddie Towns, Skokie Country Club, Glencoe, Ill., 1922
  • Leo Diegel, 146-yard 13th hole, second round, Inverness Club, Toledo, Ohio, 1931
  • Zell Eaton, Baltusrol Golf Club (Upper Course), Springfield, N.J., 1936
  • a-Dick Chapman, Baltusrol (Lower Course), Springfield, N.J., 1954
  • Johnny Weitzel, Baltusrol (Lower Course), Springfield, N.J., 1954
  • a-Billy Kuntz, 142-yard 11th hole, Oak Hill Country Club (East Course), Rochester, N.Y., 1956
  • Jerry McGee, 180-yard 5th hole, third round, Pebble Beach (Calif.) Golf Links, 1972
  • Bobby Mitchell, 180-yard 5th hole, fourth round, Pebble Beach, 1972
  • Pat Fitzsimmons, 187-yard 2nd hole, first round, Medinah (Ill.) Country Club (No. 3 Course), 1975
  • Bobby Wadkins, 208-yard 15th hole, first round, Cherry Hills Country Club, Englewood, Colo., 1978
  • Tom Weiskopf, Cherry Hills, Englewood, Colo., 1978
  • Gary Player, 185-yard 3rd hole, third round, Inverness Club, Toledo, Ohio, 1979
  • Tom Watson, 194-yard 4th hole, first round, Baltusrol (Lower Course), Springfield, N.J., 1980
  • Johnny Miller, 205-yard 12th hole, second round, Pebble Beach, 1982
  • Bill Brodell, 180-yard 5th hole, second round, Pebble Beach, 1982
  • Tom Weiskopf, 120-yard 7th hole, fourth round, Pebble Beach, 1982
  • Scott Simpson, 228-yard 16th hole, first round, Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club, 1983
  • Mark McCumber, 190-yard 10th hole, first round, Winged Foot Golf Club (West Course), Mamaroneck, N.Y., 1984
  • Ben Crenshaw, 217-yard, 9th hole, second round, Oakland Hills Country Club (South Course), Birmingham, Mich., 1985
  • Doug Weaver, 159-yard 6th hole, second round, Oak Hill Country Club (East Course), Rochester, N.Y., 1989
  • Mark Wiebe, 159-yard 6th hole, second round, Oak Hill (East Course), Rochester, N.Y., 1989
  • Jerry Pate, 159-yard 6th hole, second round, Oak Hill (East Course), Rochester, N.Y., 1989
  • Nick Price, 159-yard 6th hole, second round, Oak Hill (East Course), Rochester, N.Y., 1989
  • Jay Don Blake, 190-yard 8th hole, first round, Medinah (No. 3 Course), 1990
  • John Inman, 194-yard 4th hole, first round, Hazeltine National Golf Club, Chaska, Minn., 1991
  • Fuzzy Zoeller, 194-yard 4th hole, second round, Hazeltine National, Chaska, Minn., 1991
  • Mike Hulbert, 198-yard 12th hole, first round, Baltusrol (Lower Course), Springfield, N.J., 1993
  • Sandy Lyle, 206-yard 12th hole, fourth round, Baltusrol (Lower Course), Springfield, N.J., 1993
  • Gary Hallberg, 182-yard 7th hole, third round, Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, Southampton, N.Y., 1995
  • Chris Perry, 196-yard 13th hole, third round, The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco, Calif., 1998
  • Todd Fischer, 108-yard 7th hole, second round, Pebble Beach, 2000
  • Phil Mickelson, 174-yard 6th hole, second round, Southern Hills Country Club, Tulsa, Okla., 2001
  • Olin Browne, 165-yard 11th hole, fourth round, Southern Hills, Tulsa, Okla., 2001
  • Shigeki Maruyama, 161-yard 14th hole, second round, Bethpage State Park (Black Course), Farmingdale, N.Y., 2002
  • Andy Miller, 205-yard 3rd hole, fourth round, Bethpage State Park (Black Course), Farmingdale, N.Y., 2002
  • Scott Hoch, 207-yard 17th hole, fourth round, Bethpage State Park (Black Course), Farmingdale, N.Y., 2002
  • a-Spencer Levin, 179-yard 17th hole, first round, Shinnecock Hills, Southampton, N.Y., 2004
  • Peter Jacobsen, 175-yard 9th hole, third round, Pinehurst Resort (No. 2), Village of Pinehurst, N.C., 2005
  • Peter Hedblom, 238-yard 3rd hole, third round, Winged Foot (West Course), Mamaroneck, N.Y., 2006
  • Thongchai Jaidee, 181-yard 5th hole, third round, Pebble Beach, 2010
  • John Peterson, 199-yard 13th hole, third round, The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco, Calif., 2012
  • Shawn Stefani, 229-yard 17th hole, fourth round, Merion Golf Club (East Course), Ardmore, Pa., 2013
  • Zach Johnson, 191-yard 9th hole, fourth round, Pinehurst Resort (No. 2), Village of Pinehurst, N.C., 2014