Feminism in 1975

Important 1975 Events Related to U.S. Feminism

ERA Supporters 1975
ERA Supporters 1975. Peter Keegan / Archive Photos / Getty Images

The women's liberation movement changed many lives during the 1970s. What sort of events were happening in the middle of that decade? Take a look at the history of U.S. feminism in 1975.

  • First Lady Betty Ford supported the Equal Rights Amendment. 
  • On Mother’s Day, the National Organization for Women led a “Mother’s Day of Outrage” demonstration at the Apostolic Delegation to the U.S. in Washington, D.C. (also called the Vatican “embassy”) to protest the Catholic church’s anti-birth control efforts. 
    • Caspar Weinberger, U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, issued Title IX guidelines that required equal opportunities for women in intercollegiate sports.
    • In Taylor v. Louisiana, the Supreme Court finally ruled that states could not systematically exclude women from jury duty. 
    • In Weinberger v. Wiesenfeld, the Supreme Court ruled that it was an unconstitutional gender distinction to allow Social Security survivors’ benefits for widows (female) and their minor children but not for widowers (male) who cared for minor children.
    • In Stanton v. Stanton, a Utah law providing different ages of majority for males and females was ruled unconstitutional. The statute required divorced fathers to support sons through age 21 and women only through age 18.
    • Susan Brownmiller’s groundbreaking book Against Our Will: Men, Women and Rape was published.
    • The women’s liberation group Redstockings published the book Feminist Revolution.
      • The United Nations designated 1975 International Women’s Year and held the first World Conference on Women in Mexico City.