Fiat photo gallery

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Fiat 500 (Cinquecento)

Fiat 500
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat 500. Photo © Fiat

This gallery shows Fiat's product lineup from around the globe. With the upcoming Chrysler-Fiat partnership, some of these vehicles just might be coming to the United States. Click the thumbnails for more information about each car.

Introduced in 2007, the 500 is a retro design that harks back to the 1957-1975 Fiat 500. At just over 11.5 feet long, the four-seat 500 is about mid-way between the Smart Fortwo and the Honda Fit. Power choices consist of 1.2 and 1.4 liter gas engines and a 1.3 liter diesel, but the 500 is currently not available with an automatic transmission. The 500 is sold in many countries worldwide, including Mexico, and was the first vehicle that Fiat brought to the United States.

 

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Fiat 500C

Fiat 500C
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat 500C. Photo © Fiat

Fiat is just about to introduce a semi-convertible version of the 500 called the 500C. The full-length folding roof was a feature of the 1957-1960 Fiat 500. (Later 500s had a sliding roof, but it didn't slide all the way to the back of the car.)

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Fiat Abarth 500

Fiat Abarth 500
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Abarth 500. Photo © Fiat

The 500 Abarth gets a turbocharged version of the 500's 1.4 liter engine, which raises output from 100 hp to 135, along with modified suspension, steering and aerodynamics. Fiat now sells this car in the United States.

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Fiat Abarth 500 Assetto Corse

Fiat Abarth 500 Assetto Corse
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Abarth 500 Assetto Corse. Photo © Fiat

The Assetto Corse ("racing trim") is an extremely limited-edition (49 cars) version of the 500 Abarth. It features a 197 horsepower engine, lightweight forged aluminum wheels, racing mirrors, and a spoiler. Inside, the Assetto Corse has been stripped of most of its amenities and the driver's seat has been moved closer to the center of the car to improve balance.

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Fiat Bravo

Fiat Bravo
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Bravo. Photo © Fiat

The Bravo is a 5-door hatchback that competes against mainstream European family cars like the Volkswagen Golf, Opel Astra and Ford Focus. Fiat offers the Bravo with three gasoline engines (all 1.4 liters, 89 to 148 hp) and a staggering seven diesels.

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Fiat Croma

Fiat Croma
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Croma. Photo © Fiat

The Croma is one of Fiat's largest cars. It is essentially a tall wagon, though not quite as tall as the Kia Rondo. The Croma is built off of GM's Epsilon platform, meaning it's a not-too-distant relative of the Saab 9-3, Chevrolet Malibu and Opel Vectra (similar to our Saturn Aura). The Croma is sold in several European countries, although it was recently pulled from the UK market due to slow sales. Gasoline engines choices include 1.8 and 2.2 liter four-cylinders; diesel choices are two 1.9 liter four-cylinder units and a 2.4 liter five-cylinder.

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Fiat Doblò

Fiat Doblo
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Doblo. Photo © Fiat

The odd-looking Doblò was developed to serve as both a commercial vehicle and a small 5-seat CUV, similar to Ford's Transit Connect (which makes its US debit in 2010). The Doblò is only 6 inches longer than a Honda Fit, but has twice as much trunk space (3 times as much with the seats folded), and minivan-style sliding doors provide easy back seat access. Fiat builds Doblòs in several countries around the world, including Brazil, Turkey, Russia and Vietnam. Fiat offers the Doblò with gasoline, diesel and natural gas powerplants.

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Fiat Grande Punto

Fiat Grande Punto
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Grande Punto. Photo © Fiat

The Grande Punto is Fiat's entry in the supermini class. In Europe, it goes up against cars like the Volkswagen Polo, Ford Fiesta, and Opel Corsa, as well as cars more familiar to us like the Toyota Yaris, Honda Fit and Chevrolet Kalos (known to us as the Aveo5). The Grande Punto was co-developed with GM, and while the Giorgetto Giugiaro styling is unique to Fiat, the mechanical bits are shared with GM's Euro-market Opel Corsa. The previous version was known simply as the Punto, and is still sold in some markets. Engines include 1.2 and 1.4 liter gasoline units and 1.3, 1.6 and 1.9 liter diesels. Fiat makes a 1.4 liter 178 hp hot-rod version called the Abarth Grande Punto.

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Fiat Abarth Grande Punto

Fiat Abarth Grande Punto
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Abarth Grande Punto. Photo © Fiat

The Abarth-tuned Grande Punto gets a 155 horsepower turbocharged 1.4 liter engine (upgradable to 180 hp with the Essesse kit) along with suspension and steering modifications and unique trim inside and out.

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Fiat Idea

Fiat Idea
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Idea. Photo © Fiat

The Idea is sort of a micro-minivan. It's only about 4" longer than a Toyota Yaris hatchback, but stands a full seven inches taller, and like the Yaris has sliding and folding rear seats for maximum interior flexibility. The Idea is based on the previous-generation Punto, and like most of Fiat's cars is offered with a selection of small gas and diesel engines. Fiat sells the Idea throughout Europe and South America.

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Fiat Linea

Fiat Linea
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Linea. Photo © Fiat

Though Linea sedan was designed for emerging markets in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and India, Fiat also sells it in established markets such as South America, where simplicity and durability are important. The Linea offers Fiat's Microsoft-based Blue&Me system, which allows voice control of Bluetooth phones and USB media players, similar to Ford's SYNC, as well as rudimentary GPS navigation. Fiat builds the Linea in Turkey, India and Brazil. It is similar in size to the Toyota Corolla, Honda Civic and Ford Focus sedans, and is sold with a selection of gasoline, diesel and flex-fuel (ethanol) engines ranging from 76 to 150 horsepower.

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Fiat Multipla

Fiat Multipla
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Multipla. Photo © Fiat

The original Multipla, launched in 1998, was known for its bizarre styling (photo here) as well as its unusual interior layout: Its two-row, three-across seating gives the Multipla the same seating capacity (6) as the Mazda5 in a vehicle nearly two feet shorter. Fiat toned down the styling in 2004, but the innovative interior remains.

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Fiat Palio

Fiat Palio
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Palio. Photo © Fiat

The Palio, like the Linea and the Siena (a sedan version of the Palio), is designed for emerging markets such India, China and Russia, as well as more rugged, demanding countries like South Africa and Brazil. Fiat also makes a wagon version called the Palio Weekend. The Palio is offered with engines ranging from a gasoline-fueled 1-liter to a 1.9 liter diesel.

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Fiat Panda

Fiat Panda
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Panda. Photo © Fiat

The original Fiat Panda (photo here), with its plate-glass windshield, single wiper, and range of sub-1-liter engines, was the ultimate in basic transportation. Fiat introduced it in 1980 and aside from some mechanical updates in 1986 it remained largely unchanged for well over two decades. Stricter emissions and safety standards brought an end to the original Panda in 2003, when it was replaced by the new Panda shown here. At 139" long, the Panda is almost a foot shorter than the Toyota Yaris hatchback. The Panda is available with 1.1, 1.2 and 1.4 liter gas engines and a 1.3 liter diesel. James May, host of the British TV show Top Gear, owns a Fiat Panda.

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Fiat Panda 4x4

Fiat Panda 4x4
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Panda 4x4. Photo © Fiat

Like the original Panda, the new Panda is available in a four-wheel-drive version called the Panda 4x4. The Panda 4x4 gets an automatic all-wheel-drive system, raised suspension, and, in some models, a center differential lock and a low-range transfer case. From what I understand, it's a surprisingly capable off-roader.

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Fiat Panda Cross

Fiat Panda Cross
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Panda Cross. Photo © Fiat

Based on the Panda 4x4, the Panda Cross features a 1.3 liter diesel engine and a Subaru Outback-style body kit.

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Fiat Punto

Fiat Punto
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Punto. Photo © Fiat

The Punto supermini has been a mainstay of the Fiat lineup for years; Fiat built 5 million of them between 1993 and 2003. Although the Punto was replaced by the Grande Punto in 2005, Fiat continues to sell the old-shape Punto in several markets. In some countries, including Italy, the Punto is sold side-by-side with the Grande Punto, and is known as the Punto Classic.

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Fiat Qubo

Fiat Qubo
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Qubo. Photo © Fiat

Like the Doblò, the Qubo ("koo-boh") is based on a commercial van (the Fiat Fiorino). The Qubo shares its sliding-door layout with Doblò, although it's smaller -- 13' long, just a couple of inches longer than a Chevrolet Aveo5. The Qubo was designed in partnership with French automaker PSA Peugeot/Citroën, and is virtually identical to the Citroën Nemo Multispace and Peugeot Bipper Tepee.

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Fiat Sedici

Fiat Sedici
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Sedici. Photo © Fiat

Does the Fiat Sedici look familiar? It should -- it was designed in conjunction with Suzuki, who sells it over here as the Suzuki SX4. Unlike the SX4, which is available as a sedan, the Sedici comes exclusively as a 5-door hatchback; like the SX4 it is available with four-wheel-drive. The name is a play on the 4x4 drivetrain -- four times four equals sixteen, "sedici" in Italian. The Sedici is sold with 1.6 liter gasoline and 1.9 liter diesel engines.

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Fiat Seicento (600)

Fiat Seicento
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Seicento. Photo © Fiat

The Seicento city car was introduced in 1998 as a replacement for the previous-generation Cinquecento (500), which had similar boxy styling and dimensions (longer than a Smart Fortwo, shorter than a Honda Fit). The Seicento is notable for its poor crash test scores -- just 1.5 out of 5 stars in the Euro NCAP tests -- so the chances of it coming to the US are probably pretty darn slim. Fiat currently sells the Seicento in just a handful of European countries. Engine choices are an 899cc 39 hp four-cylinder or a 1.1 liter with 53 hp.

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Fiat Siena

Fiat Siena
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Siena. Photo © Fiat

The Siena, a sedan version of the Palio, is one of several cars that Fiat builds for developing countries. Fiat builds the Siena in several locations including India, China, and Vietnam; a rebadged version is produced under license in North Korea. Fiat builds a mildly altered version, called the Albea, for Eastern Europe. The Siena offers a wide variety of four-cylinder gas and diesel engines ranging from 1.0 to 1.8 liters. In Brazil, Fiat sells a version called the Siena 1.4 TetraFuel, which can run on pure gasoline, pure ethanol, E25 gas/ethanol blend, or compressed natural gas -- that's four types of fuel, all in the same car!

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Fiat Stilo

Fiat Stilo
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Stilo. Photo © Fiat

The Stilo was introduced in 2001 as a successor to Fiat's Golf and Astra fighters, the Bravo (3-door) and Brava (5-door). The Stilo didn't sell particularly well in Europe, and its 2007 replacement resurrected the name Bravo. But the Stilo lives on -- Fiat builds it in Brazil for the South American market.

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Fiat Stilo MutltiWagon

Fiat Stilo MultiWagon
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Stilo MultiWagon. Photo © Fiat

The Stilo was also produced as a station wagon. Like the Stilo hatchback, the Stilo MultiWagon is still being made in Brazil for the South American market.

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Fiat Ulysse

Fiat Ulysse
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Ulysse. Photo © Fiat

The Ulysse is a seven or eight-seat minivan developed in conjunction with PSA Peugeot Citroën, and is mechanically similar to the Peugeot 807, Citroën C8, and Lancia Phedra, though under the skin it's more Peugeot/Citroën than Fiat/Lancia. The Ulysse is big by European standards, but it's still 15" shorter and 2" narrower than a Honda Odyssey minivan.

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Fiat Doblò Cargo

Fiat Doblò Cargo
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Doblò Cargo. Photo © Fiat

The Doblò is a front-wheel-drive panel van that competes against Ford's Transit Connect, although the Doblò is slightly shorter and narrower. Engines include a gasoline-fueled 1.4 liter, a natural-gas-fueled 1.6 liter, and 1.3 and 1.9 liter turbodiesels. Fiat also builds a 5-seat passenger version of the Doblò.

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Fiat Ducato Cargo

Fiat Ducato Cargo
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Ducato Cargo. Photo © Fiat

The Ducato is Fiat's largest van. What makes it unusual -- by American standards, at least -- is that it employs front-wheel-drive, which provides a large cargo box and a low loading height. The Ducato is wider and (in hi-roof form) taller than the Ford E-Series van, and offers four chassis lengths ranging from about 16 feet (almost 2' shorter than the Ford E-150) to almost 21' (about a foot longer than the extended-length E350). Engine options consists of four-cylinder turbodiesels ranging from 2.2 liters and 100 hp to 3 liters and 157 hp. The Ducato was developed in conjunction with PSA Peugeot/Citroën, and is also sold as the Citroën Jumper, Peugeot Boxer and Peugeot Manager. This van is now sold in the US as the Ram Promaster.

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Fiat Ducato Passenger

Fiat Ducato Passenger
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Ducato Passenger. Photo © Fiat

The Ducato can be configured as a passenger hauler. The long-wheelbase high-roof version shown here seats ten, including the driver.

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Fiat Ducato Chassis Cab

Fiat Ducato Chassis Cab
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Ducato Chassis Cab. Photo © Fiat

Like American vans, the Ducato is available as a stripped chassis cab and fitted with any number of cargo bodies. Note the bean rear axle, a clear indicator of the Ducato's front-wheel-drive status.

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Fiat Fiorino

Fiat Fiorino
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Fiorino. Photo © Fiat

The Fiorino is designed to move cargo into crowded city centers -- it's about the same length and width as a Toyota Yaris hatchback, but can stow nearly 100 cubic feet of cargo. The right side has a van-style sliding side door for easy loading in narrow alleyways. Fiat makes a two-seat cargo version, shown here, as well as a five-seater called the Fiorino Combi that has rear-side windows an an optional second sliding door. Fiat also sells a five-seat passenger version, the Qubo, which has windows all around and a nicer interior. The Fiorino is based on the Fiat Grande Punto platform; like the Ducato and the Scudo, the Fiorino was a joint project with PSA Peugeot/Citroën, and is also sold as the Citroën Nemo and Peugeot Bipper.

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Fiat Panda Van

Fiat Panda Van
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Panda Van. Photo © Fiat

Fiat offers commercial versions of several of its cars, including the Panda, Idea, Grande Punto and Multipla. Outside, they appear similar to their passenger-carrying counterparts; inside they have simplified trim, metal grates separating passenger and cargo areas, and the option to delete the rear seat. The Panda Van's engine lineup mimics that of the regular Panda, with the addition of an optional natural-gas-fueled engine.

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Fiat Punto Van

Fiat Punto Van
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Punto Van. Photo © Fiat

The three-door, two-seat Punto Van is based on the Punto passenger car, but has body-color panels in place of the rear side windows.

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Fiat Scudo Cargo

Fiat Scudo Cargo
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Scudo Cargo. Photo © Fiat

The Scudo van comes in two lengths; the long wheelbase version is about the same size as a Honda Odyssey or a Dodge Grand Caravan, while the short wheelbase, shown here, is about 13 inches shorter. The front-wheel-drive Scudo can be powered by either a 2.0 liter gasoline engine, a 1.6 liter turbodiesel or a 2.0 liter turbodiesel. Like the Ducato and the Fiorino, the Scudo was developed with PSA Peugeot/Citroën and is also sold as the Peugeot Expert and Citroën Jumpy (Citroën Dispatch in English-speaking markets).

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Fiat Scudo Passenger

Fiat Scudo Passenger
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Scudo Passenger. Photo © Fiat

The Scudo is available as a passenger van with seating for up to 9 people.

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Fiat Scudo High Roof

Fiat Scudo High-Roof
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Scudo High-Roof. Photo © Fiat

An optional raised roof increases the Scudo's cargo capacity even further.

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Fiat Seicento Van

Fiat Seicento Van
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Seicento Van. Photo © Fiat

The Seicento (600) Van is Fiat's smallest commercial vehicle. Essentially a Seicento with the rear seat removed and a cargo guard installed, it can hold 28.6 cubic feet of stuff -- that's only about 15% less than the Volkswagen Jetta SportWagen. Power comes from a 54 hp 1.1 liter gasoline engine.

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Fiat Strada

Fiat Strada
Photo gallery of Fiat cars Fiat Strada. Photo © Fiat

If you've been around a while, you may remember the Fiat Strada as a hatchback that was sold in the 'States in the early 80s. Today, the Strada is a small front-wheel-drive pickup truck based on the Palio, itself a rugged hatchback designed for developing countries. The Strada is built in Brazil and exported to markets around the globe. The Strada's cargo box is 5'6" long and 4'5" feet wide; Fiat also offers an extended cab version, shown here, with a little extra cargo room behind the seats and a 4'3" long bed. Maximum payload is 1,550 lbs, including the driver, and engines range from a 1.2 liter gasoline engine to a 1.7 liter turbodiesel.