Florence Nightingale Quotes

These Florence Nightingale Quotes Show Us the Path of Kindness

Florence Nightingale
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The name Florence Nightingale is synonymous with selfless service. The 'lady with the lamp,' as she was fondly referred to, saved many wounded patients with her compassion.

Though Nightingale was born in the lap of luxury, with all the creature comforts that one could hope for in those days, she chose to follow her calling. She believed that God had sent her to Earth to take care of the sick. She eventually became the founder of modern nursing, and espoused the values of sanitation and nutrition in healthcare facilities.

Her book Notes on Nursing, set the foundation for modern nursing. Other texts such as: Notes on Hospitals, Notes on Matters Affecting the Health, and Efficiency and Hospital Administration of the British Army are also widely used in the nursing curriculum.

Here are some memorable Florence Nightingale quotes. Use these quotes as a source of inspiration and power.

There were many nurses before Florence Nightingale. It was only after Nightingale entered the profession that nursing earned such a respectable name. With her steely resolve to change the living conditions of sick patients, she showed the world that love heals the deepest wounds. Here are some memorable Florence Nightingale quotes. Use these quotes as a source of inspiration and power.

  • Rather, ten times, die in the surf, heralding the way to a new world, than stand idly on the shore.

  • So never lose an opportunity of urging a practical beginning, however small, for it is wonderful how often in such matters the mustard-seed germinates and roots itself.

  • No man, not even a doctor, ever gives any other definition of what a nurse should be than this -- 'devoted and obedient'. This definition would do just as well for a porter. It might even do for a horse. It would not do for a policeman.

  • Women should have the true nurse calling, the good of the sick first the second only the consideration of what is their 'place' to do – and that women who want for a housemaid to do this or the charwomen to do that, when the patient is suffering, have not the making of a nurse in them.

  • The amount of relief and comfort experienced by the sick after the skin has been carefully washed and dried, is one of the commonest observations made at a sick bed.

  • The only English patients I have ever known refuse tea, have been typhus cases; and the first sign of their getting better was their craving again for tea.

  • The very first requirement in a hospital is that it should do the sick no harm.

  • The craving for 'the return of the day', which the sick so constantly evince, is generally nothing but the desire for light.

  • The martyr sacrifices themselves entirely in vain. Or rather not in vain; for they make the selfish more selfish, the lazy more lazy, the narrow narrower.

  • There is no part of my life, upon which I can look back without pain.

  • To understand God's thoughts one must study statistics... the measure of his purpose.

  • So never lose an opportunity of urging a practical beginning, however small, for it is wonderful how often in such matters the mustard-seed germinates and roots itself.

  • Were there none who were discontented with what they have, the world would never reach anything better.

  • What the horrors of war are, no one can imagine. They are not wounds and blood and fever, spotted and low, or dysentery, chronic and acute, cold and heat and famine. They are intoxication, drunken brutality, demoralization and disorder on the part of the inferior... jealousies, meanness, indifference, selfish brutality on the part of the superior.