Learn the Names of Common Flowers (Blumen) in German

A Bavarian meadow in Spring. Getty Images Credit wingmar

Flowers are an ever-present part of the German landscape. In the middle of Lake Constance (Bodensee) in southwest Germany, for example, sits Mainau Island, also called the "Island of Flowers." Flowers also play a significant role in German traditions and holidays. In the weeks prior to Easter, you will see spring flowers on display alongside Easter trees (ostereierbaum). So, as you study German, familiarize yourself with the names of flowers and related words.

Parts of a Flower

In the translations in this and the below sections, the name of the flower, or flower-related vocabulary, is listed on the left with the German translation on the right to help you find the term or phrase more easily. Before learning the names of various flowers, take a moment to memorize German words related to the parts of a flower—or ​blumenbestandteile:

  • Blossom > die Blüte
  • Bud > die Knospe
  • Leaf > das Blatt
  • Seed > der Samen
  • Stem > der Stengel
  • Thorn > der Stachel

Common Flower Names

In Germany, several flowers are particularly abundant, including carnations, lilies, and roses, says FloraQueen. However, many other types of flowers are also common in Germany. Familiarize yourself with flower names so that you'll be able to speak knowledgeably about these plants with native speakers.

Name of Flower in English

German Translation

Lily of the valley

 das Maiglöckchen

Amaryllis

 die Amaryllis

Anemone

 die Anemone

Aster

 die Aster

Baby's Breath

 das Schleierkraut

Begonia

 die Begonie

Blanket Flower

 die Kokardenblume, die Papageiblume

Bleeding Heart

 das Tränende Herz

Carnation

 die Nelke

Columbine

 die Akelei

Cornflower (Bachelor's Button)

 die Kornblume

Crocus

 der Krokus

Daffodil

 die Narzisse, die Osterglocke

Dahlia

 die Dahlie

Daisy

 das Gänseblümchen

Dandelion

 der Löwenzahn

Echinacea

 der Sonnenhut,der Scheinsonnenhut

Edelweiss

 das Edelweiß

Forget me nots

 Vergissmeinnicht

Galliardia

 die Gaillardie

Geranium

 die Geranie

Gladiolus

 die Gladiole

Goldenrod

 die Goldrute

Heather

 die Erika, das Heidekraut

Hibiscus

 der Hibiskus, der Eibisch

Hyacinth

 die Hyazinthe

Iris

 die Iris, die Schwertlilie

Jasmin

 der Jasmin, Echter Jasmin

Jonquil

 die Jonquille

Lavender

 der Lavendel

Lilac

 der Flieder

Lily

 die Lilie

Marigold

 die Tagetes, die Ringelblume

Orchid

 die Orchidee

Pansy

 das Stiefmütterchen

Peony

 die Pfingstrose, die Päonie

Petunia

 die Petunie

Poppy

 der Mohn, die Mohnblume

Rose

 die Rose

Snapdragon

 das Garten Löwenmaul

Snowdrop

 das Schneeglöckchen

Sunflower

 die Sonnenblume

Tulip

 die Tulpe

Violet

 das Veilchen

Zinnia

 die Zinnie

Other Flower-Related Vocabulary

As you study the names of common flowers and vocabulary related to flower parts, don't forget to familiarize yourself with flower-related vocabulary. Note that in German, each noun, pronoun and article has four cases. Therefore, a common noun such as Blumenstrauß—flower bouquet—may start with a capital letter, even if it does not begin a sentence and even though it would be lowercased in English.

  • To bloom > blühen
  • To water > gießen
  • To wilt > verwelken
  • Flower bouquet > der Blumenstrauß
  • Flower shop > der Blumenladen
  • Florist > der Florist, der Blumenverkäufer

Flower Idioms

Once you've mastered the names and parts of flowers, impress your native-speaking friends with some well-known flower idioms—blumen redewendungen:

  • To beat around the bush > durch die Blume sagen
  • To push up radishes > Die Radieschen von unten anschauen/betrachten

Though the second phrase is translated literally, in English, this idiom would more normally be translated as "pushing up daisies" (to be dead). Try out this saying the next time you're watching a mobster movie with your German-speaking friends.