Popular Folk Songs for Children

Folk music are traditional songs that have been handed down from generation to generation. This type of music represents a country's heritage and is written, and may be sung and played by musicians who may or may not be trained professionally.  Instruments commonly used in ​folk music include accordions, banjos and harmonicas. Composers like Percy Grainger, Zoltan Kodaly and Bela Bartok were avid collectors of folk songs.

In many instances, the lyrics to folk songs came from existing nursery rhymes or poems, and some of the nursery rhymes had different variations, depending on region or time. Thus, it should not be surprising if these folk songs have lyrics that are slightly different from those you with which you are familiar. 

Music education methods such Orff and Kodaly use folk songs to teach important concepts, foster musicianship and respect of musical heritage. Here are several well-loved children's folk songs.

01
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Aiken Drum (Traditional Scottish Song)

Aiken Drum is a Scottish Folk Song about the Battle of Sheriffmuir. It is also sometimes recited as simple nursery rhyme:

Lyrics:

There was a man lived in the moon, lived in the moon, lived in the moon,
There was a man lived in the moon,
And his name was Aiken Drum.

Chorus
And he played upon a ladle, a ladle, a ladle,
And he played upon a ladle,
and his name was Aiken Drum.

And his hat was made of good cream cheese, of good cream cheese, of good cream cheese,
And his hat was made of good cream cheese,
And his name was Aiken Drum.

And his coat was made of good roast beef, of good roast beef, of good roast beef,
And his coat was made of good roast beef,
And his name was Aiken Drum.

And his buttons made of penny loaves, of penny loaves, of penny loaves,
And his buttons made of penny loaves,
And his name was Aiken Drum.

And his waistcoat was made of crust pies, of crust pies, of crust pies,
And his waistcoat was made of crust pies,
And his name was Aiken Drum.

And his breeches made of haggis bags, of haggis bags, of haggis bags,
And his breeches made of haggis bags,
And his name was Aiken Drum.[1]

Sheet Music

02
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Alouette (1879)

Alouette is a French-Canadian folk song about plucking the feathers from a lark, after being awakened by its song. 

French Lyrics (Excerpt):
Alouette, gentille Alouette
Alouette je te plumerai
Alouette, gentille Alouette
Alouette je te plumerai
Je te plumerai la tete
Je te plumerai la tete
Et la tte, et la tete
Alouette, Alouette
O-o-o-o-oh
Alouette, gentille Alouette
Alouette je te plumerai

English Translation (Excerpt):
Lark, nice (or lovely) Lark
Lark, I am going to pluck you
I am going to pluck your head,
I am going to pluck your head,
And the head, and the head,
O-o-o-o-oh

Sheet Music

03
of 20

A-Tisket A-Tasket (1879)

Lyrics:

A-tisket a-tasket
A-tisket a-tasket
A green and yellow basket
I wrote a letter to my love
And on the way I dropped it,
I dropped it, I dropped it,
And on the way I dropped it.
A little boy he picked it up
And put it in his pocket.[2]

Note: In some variations, the last two lines read "A little girlie picked it up/and took it to the market. 

Sheet Music

04
of 20

Baa Baa Black Sheep (1765)

"Baa Baa Black Sheep" was originally an English nursery rhyme that, in spoken form, may date back as early as 1731. 

Lyrics: 
Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir,
Three bags full.

One for the master,
One for the dame,
And one for the little boy
Who lives down the lane.

Sheet Music (PDF)

05
of 20

Frere Jacques (1811, Traditional French song)

French Lyrics:
Frère Jacques, Frère Jacques,
Dormez vous? Dormez vous?
Sonnez les matines, Sonnez les matines
Ding Ding Dong, Ding Ding Dong

English Lyrics:
Are you sleeping, are you sleeping?
Brother John, Brother John?
Morning bells are ringing,
Morning bells are ringing
Ding Ding Dong, Ding Ding Dong.

Sheet Music

06
of 20

Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush (1857)

Lyrics:

Here we go round the mulberry bush,
The mulberry bush,
The mulberry bush.
Here we go round the mulberry bush
So early in the morning.

This is the way we wash our face,
Wash our face,
Wash our face.
This is the way we wash our face
So early in the morning.

This is the way we comb our hair,
Comb our hair,
Comb our hair.
This is the way we comb our hair
So early in the morning.

This is the way we brush our teeth,
Brush our teeth,
Brush our teeth.
This is the way we brush our teeth
So early in the morning.

This is the way we wash our clothes
Wash our clothes, wash our clothes
This is the way we wash our clothes
So early Monday morning

This is the way we put on our clothes,
Put on our clothes,
Put on our clothes.
This is the way we put on our clothes
So early in the morning


Sheet Music (PDF)

07
of 20

He's Got the Whole World in His Hands (traditional

"He's Got the Whole World In His Hands" is a traditional American spiritual that was first published as printed music in 1927. 

Lyrics 

He's got the whole world in His hands
He's got the whole world in His hands
He's got the whole world in His hands
He's got the whole world in His hands

He's got the itty bitty baby in His hands
He's got the itty bitty baby in His hands
He's got the itty bitty baby in His hands
He's got the whole world in His hands

He's got my brothers and my sisters in His hands,
He's got my brothers and my sisters in His hands,
He's got my brothers and my sisters in His hands,
He's got the whole world in His hands.

He's got the whole world in His hands
He's got the whole world in His hands
He's got the whole world in His hands
He's got the whole world in His hands


Sheet Music

08
of 20

Home on the Range (1873, words by Brewster Higley/music by Daniel Kelley)

The lyrics to this folk song were first published as a poem in the 1870s. 

Lyrics:

Oh, give me a home where the buffalo roam,
& the deer and the antelope play,
Where seldom is heard a discouraging word
And the skies are not cloudy all day.

Chorus
Home, home on the range,
Where the deer and the antelope play;
Where seldom is heard a discouraging word
And the skies are not cloudy all day.

Where the air is so pure, the zephyrs so free,
The breezes so balmy and light,
That I would not exchange my home on the range
For all of the cities so bright.

(repeat Chorus)

The red man was pressed from this part of the West
He's likely no more to return,
To the banks of Red River where seldom if ever
Their flickering camp-fires burn.

(repeat Chorus)

How often at night when the heavens are bright
With the light from the glittering stars
Have I stood here amazed and asked as I gazed
If their glory exceeds that of ours.

(repeat Chorus)

Oh, I love these wild prairies where I roam
The curlew I love to hear scream
And I love the white rocks and the antelope flocks
That graze on the mountain-tops green.

(repeat Chorus)

Oh, give me a land where the bright diamond sand
Flows leisurely down the stream;
Where the graceful white swan goes gliding along
Like a maid in a heavenly dream.

(repeat Chorus)

Sheet Music

09
of 20

London Bridge Is Falling Down (1744)

The English nursery rhyme lyrics that became this song may date back to the 17th century, but the current tune and lyrics were first published together in 1744. 

Lyrics (Excerpt):
London Bridge is falling down,

Falling down, falling down.
London Bridge is falling down,
My fair lady!

London Bridge is broken down,
Broken down, broken down.
London Bridge is broken down,
My fair lady.

Build it up with wood and clay,
Wood and clay, wood and clay,
Build it up with wood and clay,
My fair lady.

Wood and clay will wash away,
Wash away, wash away,
Wood and clay will wash away,
My fair lady.

Sheet Music

10
of 20

Mary Had a Little Lamb (1866, by Sarah Josepha Hale)

Lyrics: 

Mary had a little lamb, little lamb,
little lamb, Mary had a little lamb
whose fleece was white as snow.
And everywhere that Mary went
Mary went, Mary went, everywhere
that Mary went
The lamb was sure to go.

He followed her to school one day,
school one day, school one day,
He followed her to school one day,
Which was against the rules,
It made the children laugh and play,
laugh and play, laugh and play,
It made the children laugh and play,
To see a lamb at school.

And so the teacher turned it out,
turned it out, turned it out,
And so the teacher turned it out,
But still it lingered near,
He waited patiently about,
ly about, ly about,
He waited patiently about,
Till Mary did appear.

"Why does the lamb love Mary so?"
love Mary so?" love Mary so?"
"Why does the lamb love Mary so?"
The eager children cried.
"Why, Mary loves the lamb, you know,"
lamb, you know," lamb, you know,"
"Why, Mary loves the lamb, you know,"
The teacher did reply.

Sheet Music

11
of 20

Old MacDonald Had a Farm (w. 1706, m. 1859)

Lyrics::
Old Macdonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O
And on his farm he had a cow, E-I-E-I-O
With a "moo-moo" here and a "moo-moo" there
Here a "moo" there a "moo"
Everywhere a "moo-moo"
Old Macdonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O

(epeat with other animals and their sounds)

Sheet Music

12
of 20

Pop Goes the Weasel (1853)

Lyrics (Excerpt):

Round and round the cobbler's bench
(or all around the mulberrry bush)
The monkey chased the weasel,
The monkey thought 'twas all in fun
Pop! Goes the weasel.

A penny for a spool of thread
A penny for a needle,
That's the way the money goes,
Pop! Goes the weasel.

Sheet Music

13
of 20

Ring Around the Rosies

This song first appeared in print in 1881, but it is reported it was already being sung in a version close to its current one in the 1790s. 

Lyrics (Excerpt):
Ring around the rosies
A pocket full of posies;
Ashes, Ashes
All stand still.

The King has sent his daughter,
To fetch a pail of water;
Ashes, Ashes
All fall down.

14
of 20

Row Row Row Your Boat (w. 1852, m. 1881)

Lyrics:
Row, row, row your boat
Gently down the stream.
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily,
Life is but a dream.

Sheet Music (PDF)

15
of 20

She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain (1899)

Lyrics (Excerpt):
She'll be coming round the mountain when she comes
She'll be coming round the mountain when she comes
She'll be coming round the mountain, she'll be coming round the mountain,
She'll be coming round the mountain when she comes

She'll be driving six white horses when she comes
She'll be driving six white horses when she comes
She'll be driving six white horses, she'll be driving six white horses,
She'll be driving six white horses when she comes

Sheet Music (Download)
16
of 20

Skip To My Lou (1844)

This popular children's song is said to have been a partner-stealing dance game popular in the 1840s, and it's possible that Abraham Lincoln danced to it. 

Lyrics (Excerpt):
Lost my partner,
What'll I do?
Lost my partner,
What'll I do?
Lost my partner,
What'll I do?
Skip to my lou, my darlin'.

Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip, skip, skip to my Lou,
Skip to my Lou, my darlin'.

Sheet Music (PDF)

17
of 20

Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1908, w. Jack Norworth/m. Albert Von Tilzer

"Take Me Out to the Ballgame" was a popular Tin Pan Alley song from 1908, which later became an anthem sung at baseball games, as well as a popular children's folk song. The lyrics that most people sing as the entire song is actually the chorus of a much longer song. 

Lyrics (Excerpt):
Take me out to the ball game,
Take me out with the crowd.
Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack,
I don't care if I never get back,
Let me root, root, root for the home team,
If they don't win it's a shame.
For it's one, two, three strikes, you're out,
At the old ball game.

Sheet Music (Download)

18
of 20

Three Blind Mice (1609)

Lyrics:
Three blind mice,
Three blind mice
See how they run,
See how they run!

They all ran after
The farmer's wife
She cut off their tails
With a carving knife
Did you ever see
Such a sight in your life
As three blind mice?

Sheet Music
19
of 20

Twinkle Twinkle Little Star (1765, words by Jane Taylor)

This popular folk song takes its lyrics from a poem by Jane Taylor, which was published in song form in 1806. 

Lyrics: 

Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, through the night.

Then the traveller in the dark
Thanks you for your tiny spark;
He could not see where to go,
If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,
And often through my curtains peep,
For you never shut your eye
Till the sun is in the sky.

As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark,
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.


Sheet Music (PDF)

20
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Suggested Songbooks and CD's

Songbooks: 

CDs:

  • Smithsonian Folkways Children's Music Collection.
  • Animal Folk Songs.
  • A Child's Celebration of Folk Music.