Fun Bubble Science Projects

Science Projects and Experiments with Bubbles

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Helmenstine, Anne Marie, Ph.D. "Fun Bubble Science Projects." ThoughtCo, Feb. 6, 2017, thoughtco.com/fun-bubble-science-projects-603932. Helmenstine, Anne Marie, Ph.D. (2017, February 6). Fun Bubble Science Projects. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/fun-bubble-science-projects-603932 Helmenstine, Anne Marie, Ph.D. "Fun Bubble Science Projects." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/fun-bubble-science-projects-603932 (accessed October 23, 2017).

It's fun to play with bubbles! You can do much more with bubbles than simply blow a few here and there. Here's a list of fun science projects and experiments involving bubbles.

01
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Make Bubble Solution

Bubbles floating
Eugenio Marongiu/Cultura/Getty Images

Before we get too far along, you might want to make up some bubble solution. Yes, you can buy bubble solution. It is easy to make it yourself, too.

Make a bubble rainbow with a water bottle, old sock, dishwashing liquid and food coloring.
Make a bubble rainbow with a water bottle, old sock, dishwashing liquid and food coloring. Anne Helmenstine

Make a rainbow of bubbles using a sock, dishwashing liquid, and food coloring. This simple project is fun, messy, and great way to explore bubbles and color. More »

Bubble Print
Bubble Print. Anne Helmenstine

This is a project in which you capture the impression of bubbles on paper. It is fun, plus a great way to study the shapes bubbles make. More »

This soap sculpture actually resulted from a small piece of Ivory soap.
This soap sculpture actually resulted from a small piece of Ivory soap. My microwave literally filled when I nuked an entire bar. Anne Helmenstine

This project is a super-easy way to produce a mound of bubbles in your microwave. It doesn't harm your microwave or the soap. More »

This is a dry ice bubble.
If you coat a container of water and dry ice with bubble solution you will get a bubble that sort of resembles a crystal ball. Anne Helmenstine

This project uses dry ice and bubble solution to make a giant bubble that resembles a swirling cloudy crystal ball. More »

If you blow a flammable gas into soapy water, you can ignite the resulting bubbles.
If you blow a flammable gas into soapy water, you can ignite the bubbles, apparently setting them on fire. Anne Helmenstine

This project requires adult supervision! You blow flammable bubbles and set them on fire. More »

Close-Up Of Bubble
Andreas Dalmann/EyeEm/Getty Images

These colored bubbles are based on disappearing ink so the pink or blue bubble color vanishes after the bubbles pop, leaving no stains. More »

Glowing Bubble
Glowing Bubble. Anne Helmenstine

It is easy to make bubbles that will glow when exposed to a black light. This fun bubble project is great for parties. More »

A 2-litre (0.44 imp gal; 0.53 US gal) bottle of Diet Coke just after Mentos were dropped into it
Michael Murphy/Wikimedia Commons/CC BY SA 3.0

You can use other candies for this project besides Mentos. They need to be about the same size as the opening to your bottle and should stack neatly. Diet soda is usually recommended for this project because it doesn't produce a sticky mess, but you can use normal soda just fine. More »

Frost patterns form as bubbles freeze.
Frost patterns form as bubbles freeze. 10kPhotography/Getty Images

You can use dry ice to freeze bubbles solid so that you can pick them up and examine them closely. You can use this project to demonstrate several scientific principles, such as density, interference, semipermeability, and diffusion. More »

11
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Antibubbles created with soapy water by repeatedly and quickly dipping a small hollow cylinder in and out of the water.
The Alpha Wolf/Wikimedia Commons/CC 3.0

Antibubbles are droplets of liquid that are surrounded by a thin film of gas. There are several places you can observe antibubbles, plus you can make them yourself. More »

Format
mla apa chicago
Your Citation
Helmenstine, Anne Marie, Ph.D. "Fun Bubble Science Projects." ThoughtCo, Feb. 6, 2017, thoughtco.com/fun-bubble-science-projects-603932. Helmenstine, Anne Marie, Ph.D. (2017, February 6). Fun Bubble Science Projects. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/fun-bubble-science-projects-603932 Helmenstine, Anne Marie, Ph.D. "Fun Bubble Science Projects." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/fun-bubble-science-projects-603932 (accessed October 23, 2017).