De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible

01
of 13

Self-Portrait [Et quid amabo nisi quod aenigma est?], 1911

© Estate of Giorgio de Chirico; used with permission
Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978). Self-Portrait [Et quid amabo nisi quod aenigma est?], 1911. Oil on canvas. 72.5 x 55 cm (28 1/2 x 21 5/8 in.). Private Collection. © Estate of Giorgio de Chirico / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome

On View February 26-July 18, 2010 at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence


De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

02
of 13

The Enigma of the Arrival and the Afternoon, 1911-12

© Estate of Giorgio de Chirico; used with permission
Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978). The Enigma of the Arrival and the Afternoon, 1911-12. Oil on canvas. 70 x 86.5 cm (27 1/2 x 34 in.). Private Collection. © Estate of Giorgio de Chirico / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

03
of 13

The Nostalgia of the Infinite, 1912

© Estate of Giorgio de Chirico; used with permission
Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978). The Nostalgia of the Infinite, 1912. Oil on canvas. 135.2 x 64.8 cm (53 1/4 x 25 1/2 in.). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © Estate of Giorgio de Chirico / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

04
of 13

The Serenity of the Scholar, 1914

© Estate of Giorgio de Chirico; used with permission
Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978). The Serenity of the Scholar, 1914. Oil and charcoal on canvas. 130.1 x 72.4 cm (51 1/4 x 28 1/2 in.). Gift of Sylvia Slifka in honor of Joseph Slifka. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © Estate of Giorgio de Chirico / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

05
of 13

The Drunken Gentleman, 1916

© Estate of Carlo Carrà / VAGA, New York / SIAE, Rome; used with permission
Carlo Carrà (Italian, 1881-1966) Carlo Carrà (Italian, 1881-1966). The Drunken Gentleman, 1916. Oil on canvas. 60 x 45 cm (23 9/16 x 17 11/16 in.). Private Collection. © Estate of Carlo Carrà / VAGA, New York / SIAE, Rome


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

06
of 13

Roman Countryside, 1922

© Estate of Giorgio de Chirico; used with permission
Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978). Roman Countryside, 1922. Tempera on canvas. 101.5 x 75.7 cm (39 15/16 x 29 3/4 in.). Private Collection. © Estate of Giorgio de Chirico / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

07
of 13

Oedipus Rex, 1922

© Estate of Max Ernst; used with permission
Max Ernst (French, b. Germany, 1891-1976) Max Ernst (French, b. Germany, 1891-1976). Oedipus Rex, 1922. Oil on canvas. 93 x 102 cm (36 9/16 x 40 1/8 in.). Private Collection. © Estate of Max Ernst / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

08
of 13

Vision Induced by the Nocturnal Aspect of the Porte St. Denis, 1927

© Estate of Max Ernst; used with permission
Max Ernst (French, b. Germany, 1891-1976) Max Ernst (French, b. Germany, 1891-1976). Vision Induced by the Nocturnal Aspect of the Porte St. Denis, 1927. Oil on canvas. 65 x 81 cm (25 9/16 x 31 7/8 in.). Private Collection. © Estate of Max Ernst / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

09
of 13

The Meaning of Night, 1927

© Estate of René Magritte; used with permission
René Magritte (Belgian, 1898-1967) René Magritte (Belgian, 1898-1967). The Meaning of Night, 1927. Oil on canvas. 139 x 105 cm (54 11/16 x 41 5/16 in.). The Menil Collection, Houston. © Estate of René Magritte / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

10
of 13

Wig Stand Mannequin with Pear-Shaped Money-Box, 1929

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Pro Litteris, Zurich; used with permission
Niklaus Stoecklin (Swiss, 1896-1982) Niklaus Stoecklin (Swiss, 1896-1982). Wig Stand Mannequin with Pear-Shaped Money-Box, 1929. Oil on canvas. 47 x 38 cm (18 1/2 x 14 15/16 in.). Private Collection. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Pro Litteris, Zurich


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

11
of 13

The Key to Dreams, 1930

© Estate of René Magritte; used with permission
René Magritte (Belgian, 1898-1967) René Magritte (Belgian, 1898-1967). The Key to Dreams, 1930. Oil on canvas. 81 x 60 cm (31 7/8 x 23 9/16 in.). Private Collection. © Estate of René Magritte / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

12
of 13

The Human Condition, 1933

© Estate of René Magritte; used with permission
René Magritte (Belgian, 1898-1967) René Magritte (Belgian, 1898-1967). The Human Condition, 1933. Oil on canvas. 100 x 81 cm (39 3/8 x 31 7/8 in.). Gift of the Collectors Committee. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. © Estate of René Magritte / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.
 

13
of 13

The Passage du Commerce-Saint-André, 1952-54

© 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Balthasar Klossowski de Rola, known as Balthus (French, 1908-2001) Balthasar Klossowski de Rola, known as Balthus (French, 1908-2001). The Passage du Commerce-Saint-André, 1952-54. Oil on canvas. 294 x 330 cm (115 3/4 x 129 7/8 in.). Private Collection. © 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible focuses on the work of Giorgio de Chirico (Italian, b. Greece, 1888-1978) whose "enigma" paintings formed the nucleus of the Pittura Metafisica movement, and subsequently inspired others: Magic Realism, Novecento Italiano and Surrealism. Through the one hundred paintings in the show, viewers will see a linear connection from de Chirico and his contemporary Carlo Carrà, to artists Max Ernst, René Magritte, Niklaus Stoecklin and Balthus, among others.

This centenary exhibition is appropriately being held in Florence where, in 1909-10, de Chirico's studies of the German philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Arthur Schopenhauer coalesced into visions the artist could "see with his spirit" and put on canvas.

De Chirico, Max Ernst, Magritte and Balthus: A Look Into the Invisible will be on view at the Palazzo Strozzi, Florence from February 26 through July 18, 2010.