Georgia Tech GPA, SAT and ACT Data

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Georgia Tech GPA, SAT and ACT Graph

Georgia Tech GPA, SAT and ACT Data for Admission
Georgia Tech GPA, SAT Scores and ACT Scores for Admission. Data courtesy of Cappex.

How Do You Measure Up at Georgia Tech?

Calculate Your Chances of Getting In with this free tool from Cappex.

​Discussion of Georgia Tech's Admissions Standards:

The Georgia Institute of Technology is a selective public university that accepts only a third of all applicants. Accepted students tend to have both high grades and high test scores. In the graph above, the blue and green dots represent accepted students, and you can see that the majority of students who got in had a high school GPA of 3.5 or higher, SAT scores (RW+M) of 1200 or higher, and ACT composite of 25 or higher. The higher those numbers are, the more likely a student is to be accepted. Note that a few students with high GPAs and strong test scores still got rejected or waitlisted from Georgia Tech. In fact, there's a lot of red (rejected students) and yellow (waitlisted students) hidden behind the blue and green in the upper right of the graph. See the rejection data for Georgia Tech to get the full picture of students who do not get in.

Note also that a few students were accepted with test scores and grades a bit below the norm. Georgia Tech has holistic admissions, so the admissions officers are evaluating students based on more than numerical data. The Georgia Tech admissions website lists the factors that are used to make an admissions decision:

  1. Your Academic Preparation: Have you taken the most challenging and rigorous courses available? Advanced Placement, IB and Honors courses can all play an important role here, as can college credits you earned as a high school student.
  2. Standardized Test Scores: You can take the SAT or ACT. Georgia Tech will super score you results (that is, if you took an exam more than once, the admissions folks will use your highest scores from each subsection)
  3. Your Contribution to the Community: This is where your extracurricular activities come in. Georgia Tech explicitly notes that it is not looking for the quantity of your activities, but the depth. They want to enroll students who show depth and dedication to something outside of the classroom.
  4. Your Personal Essays: Along with a winning Common Application essay, the admissions folks will be looking for thoughtful supplemental essays. Make sure the essays present something meaningful about you and that they are well written. 
  5. Letters of Recommendation: While you need submit only a counselor recommendation, the university invites you to submit a teacher recommendation as well. This would be a good idea if you have a teacher who knows your work well and believes in your abilities.
  6. Interview: While the institute does not conduct interviews on campus, they do recommend that students for whom English is not their first language arrange an interview with a third-party provider. This helps Georgia Tech learn if your language skills are adequate for college success.
  7. Institutional Fit: This is a broad category, but the idea is simple. Georgia Tech is looking for students whose strengths and passions align with the goals of the institute and the demands of the particular major the applicant plans to pursue.

To learn more about the Georgia Tech, high school GPAs, SAT scores and ACT scores, these articles can help:

Articles Featuring Georgia Tech:

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Georgia Tech Admissions Data for Rejected and Waitlisted Students

Georgia Tech GPA, SAT and ACT Data for Rejected and Waitlisted Students
Georgia Tech GPA, SAT Scores and ACT Scores for Rejected and Waitlisted. Data courtesy of Cappex.

The graph on the previous page makes it look like most students with grades up in the "A" range and high SAT or ACT scores will be admitted. However, if we look behind the accepted student data on the Cappex graph, we see an awful lot of red (rejected students) and yellow (waitlisted students). Clearly many students with strong numerical measures are not getting into Georgia Tech.

You'll also notice a lot of yellow in that upper right corner. This tells us that Georgia Tech relies heavily on waitlists, and many students with top grades and test scores are put into waitlist limbo while Georgia Tech finds out if they have met their enrollment targets.

Why Are Strong Students Rejected from Georgia Tech?

Georgia Tech has a holistic admissions process, so the admissions officers are looking at the whole applicant to find good matches for the institute. Grades and test scores are just one part of the equation. Clearly you need high grades and strong SAT/ACT scores, but that alone isn't enough. Students who haven't demonstrated meaningful involvement in co-curricular activities are likely to be rejected for they don't show evidence that they will enrich the campus community. Also, students who write application essays that don't seem authentic or that are shallow might be rejected. 

Finally, keep in mind that the Georgia Tech admissions folks will be thinking about "institutional fit" as they decide whether to accept or reject an applicant. An important consideration for this piece of the equation is making sure your skills and interests align with the major you indicate you want to pursue. If you state that you want to go into an engineering field but you clearly struggle in your math courses, this would be a giant red flag for institutional fit.

Don't let all of this red in the graph discourage you, but you should take it into consideration as you choose the schools to which you apply. You'd be wise to consider a highly selective school like Georgia Tech a reach, not a match or safety, even if your grades and test scores are in line for admission.

For more information on the institute and what it takes to get in, be sure to read the Georgia Tech Profile.