Golfer Nicknames: The Big List

Miguel Angel Jimenez's nickname is The Mechanic
Miguel Angel Jimenez knowns a thing or two about cars from time spent working as an auto mechanic - hence his nickname, 'The Mechanic'.. Ross Kinnaird/Getty Images

The history of golf is full of players with distinctive, memorable nicknames. And also, let's be honest, mundane ones, too. We've gone back through our game's history to put together this big list of golfer nicknames, from the sublime to ridiculous. (With a few exceptions, we've stayed away from nicknames that consist of simply adding a "y" or an "s" to a golfer's real name - Webby for Karrie Webb, for example.)

If you think we've missed a good one, let us hear about it on Twitter or on Facebook.

Golfers are listed alphabetically below and on Page 2, and in many cases the origin of a nickname is explained. (If the nickname itself is linked, you can click that link to read an explanation.)

Now, browse away:

  • Tommy Aaron: The Bridesmaid. He finished second a lot more often than he finished first - 13 times vs. twice; finished third another 15 times.
  • Shi-Hyun Ahn: Cinderella
  • Helen Alfredsson: Alfie
  • Peter Alliss: The Voice of Golf, earned in his post-playing days, when he became the most famous golf broadcaster in the U.K. and well-known around the world.
  • George Archer: The Gilroy Cowboy or The Golfing Cowboy. Worked a summer job as a teen at a ranch in Gilroy, Calif.
  • Tommy Armour: The Silver Scot
  • Woody Austin: Aquaman
  • Paul Azinger: Zinger
  • Aaron Baddeley: Badds
  • Ian Baker-Finch: Finchie
  • Miller Barber: Mr. X or Mr. Consistency
  • Ken Brown: The Walking 1-Iron
  • Brad Bryant: Dr. Dirt. Given him by Gary McCord because Bryant often appeared unkempt.
  • Johnny Bulla: Boo Boo. Named that by Sam Snead because Snead though Bulla blew too many shots. (Snead and Bulla were close friends.)
  • Walt Burkemo: Sarge. Was an infantry sargeant during World War II in the U.S. Army, earning two Purple Hearts and seeing action in, among other engagements, the Battle of the Bulge.
  • Sam Byrd: Babe Ruth's Legs. This nickname comes from baseball, which was the sport Byrd played first. He spent several years on the New York Yankees during the Babe Ruth years, and often appeared as a pinch-runner for Ruth - hence, the nickname.
  • Angel Cabrera: El Pato (The Duck)
  • Donna Caponi: Watusi Kid. She loved to dance.
  • JoAnne Carner: The Great Gundy before she got married, when her maiden name was Gunderson; later, after turning pro, Big Momma.
  • Billy Casper: Buffalo Bill because he used buffalo meat as a staple in his diet for its lean properties. Buffalo meat was a very unusual food item in the 1960s.
  • Bob Charles: Sphinx of the Links, because he spoke very little during rounds.
  • T.C. Chen: Two Chip. Leading by four in the final round of 1985 U.S. Open, Chen quadruple-bogied the fifth hole. His mangling of that hole included a double-hit on a chip shot - his club contacted the ball twice - which carries a penalty. Chen was already known by his initials T.C., which then became Two Chip.
  • K.J. Choi: Tank
  • Na Yeon Choi: NYC or The Big Apple
  • Carlota Ciganda: Chiggy
  • Bobby Clampett: Harpo, for his curly mop of hair that resembled Harpo Marx.
  • Tim Clark: Penguin
  • Nicolas Colsaerts: The Belgian Bomber
  • John Cook: Cookie
  • Harry Cooper: Lighthorse, sometimes Pipeline. Got the Lighthorse nickname from sportswriter Damon Runyan for his speedy pace of place. (Pipeline is a reference to hitting it down the middle of the fairway.)
  • Henry Cotton: Maestro
  • Fred Couples: Boom Boom for booming drives, or Freddie Cool.
  • Wilfred Cox: Wiffy
  • Bruce Crampton: Iron Man. Played seemingly every week.
  • Paula Creamer: The Pink Panther
  • Ben Crenshaw: Gentle Ben. Crenshaw definitely has a gentle public demeanor and speaking voice, but this nickname was given to him ironically: As a junior golfer he had a terrible temper, so they called him Gentle Ben. (The temper sometimes came out later, too, such as the time in a Ryder Cup he snapped his putter and had to putt with a 1-iron or sand wedge the remainder of the match.)
  • Fay Crocker: El Toro (The Bull)
  • John Daly: Long John, The Lion, Wild Thing
  • Jimmy Demaret: Crooner because he loved to sing, Wardrobe because he dressed flashy on the golf course.
  • Gardner Dickinson: Chicken Hawk or Sparrow Hawk. Ben Hogan was The Hawk, and Dickinson idolized Hogan to the point of patterning himself - his swing, his attire, his mannerisms - after Hogan. So the other pros called him Chicken Hawk, mostly behind his back.
  • Leo Diegel: Eagle Diegel
  • Allen Doyle: The Grip
  • Victor Dubuisson: Golden Hands. Earned the nicknamed at the 2014 WGC Match Play Championship with two amazing recovery shots out of rocky, cactus-filled native areas, on extra holes in a match against Jason Day.
  • Ed Dudley: Big Ed - he was 6-foot-4, 200 pounds, a large man for his time in golf in the 1920s and 1930s.
  • Jason Dufner: Duf or Duf Daddy
  • Olin Dutra: King Kong, both for his size - 6-foot-3, 230 pounds (he played in the 1920s and 1930s) - and for his length off the tee.
  • David Duval: Double D
  • Ernie Els: The Big Easy
  • Johnny Farrell: The Gentleman
  • Dow Finsterwald: Finstie
  • Ray Floyd: Pretty Boy or Tempo Raymondo. Pretty Boy stems from Floyd's reputation as a carousing ladies man early in his career. Tempo Raymondo is a reference to the timing and rhythm of Floyd's swing.
  • Rickie Fowler: Steek, a play on "stick," as in hitting it close to the flagstick all the time. Nickname dates from his amateur days.
  • David Frost: Frosty
  • Tommy Gainey: Two Gloves - he wears golf gloves on both hands.
  • Sergio Garcia: El Nino
  • Robert Garrigus: Gorillagus (he hits the ball a long way)
  • Al Geiberger: Mr. 59. Alternately, The Peanut Butter Kid or Skippy because he used to pack his golf bag with peanut butter sandwiches and munch them during rounds.
  • Bob Gilder: Glider
  • Retief Goosen: The Goose
  • Hubert Green: Hubie, The Doberman
  • Jesse Guilford: The 1921 U.S. Amateur winner was called The Great Excavator (for his ability to dig a ball out of any lie) or The Boston Siege Gun (or just Siege Gun) for his long drives.
  • Natalie Gulbis: Nat-Nat
  • Ralph Guldahl: Goldie
  • Jay Haas: Jaybird
  • Walter Hagen: The Haig or Sir Walter
  • Marlene Hagge: Gremlin or just "Grem"
  • E.J. Harrison: Dutch
  • Morris Hatalsky: Mo-Cat, itself sort of a nickname for Morris the Cat.
  • Harold Henning: Horse
  • Tim Herron: Lumpy, for his portly build.
  • Hisako Higuchi: Chako
  • Simon Hobday: Scruffy because, well, he often looked like a slob.
  • Ben Hogan: The Hawk or Bantam Ben; in Scotland they called him The Wee Ice Man.
  • Charles Howell III: Chucky Three Sticks or Thurston
  • Brian Huggett: The Welsh Bulldog or just Bulldog
  • Tony Jacklin: Jacko
  • Peter Jacobsen: Jake
  • Barry Jaeckel: Hollywood. Son of movie actor Richard Jaeckel.
  • Mark James: Jesse
  • Don January: Slim
  • Miguel Angel Jimenez: The Mechanic. He received this nickname in 1999 from fellow pros who knew he worked in an auto repair shop before becoming a pro golfer, and because the name fit his methodical style on the golf course.
  • Bobby Jones: The Emperor
  • Robert Karlsson: The Scientist for his analytical approach.
  • Herman Keiser: The Missouri Mortician. He always appeared serious on the golf course, sometimes dour.
  • I.K. Kim: Inky
  • Mi Hyun Kim: Peanut, for her small size.
  • Tom Kite: Mr. Consistency
  • Matt Kuchar: Kooch (continue to Page 2)
  • Ky Laffoon: Chief
  • Paul Lawrie: Chippie
  • Jee-Young Lee: Jelly
  • Tony Lema: Champagne Tony
  • Bruce Lietzke: Leaky because of his strong fade ball flight (the ball was always "leaking" left). It was once said that for Lietzke a draw was a shot that only faded two feet.
  • Brittany Lincicome: Bam Bam
  • Lawson Little: Cannonball
  • Gene Littler: Gene the Machine. His swing was so consistent, so smooth and rhythmic, that a golf instructional VHS was once made that featured nothing but Littler's swing over and over and over again.
  • Bobby Locke: Old Baggy Pants or Old Muffin Face (sometimes shortened to just Muffin). Sam Snead gave him the Muffin Face name for his big, round face and, on the course, unchanging expression.
  • Davis Love III: DL3
  • Roger Maltbie: The Course Whisperer, a name Maltbie got during his broadcasting career for using the "golf whisper" to call the action.
  • Matteo Manassero: Manny
  • Lloyd Mangrum: Mr. Icicle. He was always cool under pressure on the course, but could also display a frosty personality.
  • Graham Marsh: Swampy
  • Steve Martin: Night Fever. A European Tour player in the late 1970s and the 1980s, he loved to hit the clubs. The dance clubs, that is.
  • Shigeki Maruyama: The Smiling Assassin
  • Catriona Matthew: Beany, given to her by her older brother during childhood.
  • Don Massengale: Bugs Bunny because his two front teeth reminded of those belonging to the cartoon rabbit.
  • Graeme McDowell: G-Mac
  • Tom McNamara: Tommy Mac
  • Harold McSpaden: Jug, which he was almost always called instead of his given name. McSpaden and his buddy Byron Nelson were collectively known as the Gold Dust Twins.
  • Bill Mehlhorn: Wild Bill
  • Steve Melnyk: Fluff. (Said to have inspired the nickname of famous caddie Fluff Cowan, who, in his younger days, resembled Melnyk.)
  • Phil Mickelson: Lefty, Philly Mick, Phil the Thrill
  • Cary Middlecoff: Doc or Cavity - he was a dentist.
  • Johnny Miller: The Man with the Plastic Arm is what Lanny Wadkins called Miller. Wadkins once explained why to Golf Digest: "Johnny could pat himself on the back from any position."
  • Colin Montgomerie: Monty
  • Orville Moody: Sarge, from his time in the U.S. Army
  • Gil Morgan: Doc. He had a degree in optometry.
  • Tom Morris Jr.: Tommy when he was alive; later referred to as Young Tom
  • Tom Morris Sr.: Old Tom
  • Azahara Munoz: Aza
  • Byron Nelson: Lord Byron. He and buddy Jug McSpaden together were called The Gold Dust Twins, a nickname earned in 1945 when they finished 1-2 many times.
  • Liselotte Neumann: Lotta
  • Jack Nicklaus: The Golden Bear, before that Fat Jack or Ohio Fats; also, Carnac because he had an answer for everything.
  • Greg Norman: Great White Shark then just The Shark
  • Jose Maria Olazabal: Ollie or, among his fellow Spaniards, Chemma
  • Ed Oliver: Porky - a man of standard height who carried a lot of weight (5-foot-9, 240 pounds during his playing days).
  • Christy O'Connor Sr.: Himself
  • Peter Oosterhuis: Oostie
  • Louis Oosthuizen: Shrek, for his facial resemblance to the animated movie character.
  • Masashi Ozaki: Jumbo
  • Tateo Ozaki: Jet
  • Arnold Palmer: Arnie or The King. During his playing days was sometimes called "Harry Hitch" by fellow pros for his habit of hitching up his pants before playing a shot.
  • Jesper Parnevik: Spaceman
  • Grace Park: Sleeper (she can sleep anywhere) or Flat Screen (for the shape - or lack of shape, she once explained - of her backside).
  • Hee Young Park: Rocket
  • Willie Park Sr.: Auld Willie
  • Craig Parry: Popeye, for his large forearms.
  • Steve Pate: Volcano. You never knew when his temper might blow.
  • Corey Pavin: Bulldog
  • Dottie Pepper: Hot Pepper
  • Suzann Pettersen: Tutta
  • Henry Picard: Pic or The Hershey Hurricane. The latter nickname because he worked as the head pro at Hershey Country Club in Hershey, Pa., and twice won the Hershey Open. His affiliation with Hershey led some sportswriters to call him "The Chocolate Soldier."
  • Mark Pfeil: Piffle, which is how some tee announcers mispronounced the name of this 1970s/1980s PGA Tour player (and later, Champions Tour player).
  • Gary Player: The Black Knight, because he loved to wear black, even all-black, outfits.
  • Dan Pohl: Pohlcat
  • Morgan Pressel: Mo or Thumbs ("Thumbs" for how much texting she does).
  • Dana Quigley: Iron Man
  • Mike Reid: Radar - his drives seemingly always found the fairway.
  • Ted Rhodes: Rags
  • Robert Riegel: Skee, which he was called far more often than his given name. The 1947 U.S. Amateur champion picked up the nickname as a youth, when he would strap planks of wood onto his shoes in order to ski down a hill near his house.
  • Loren Roberts: Boss of the Moss
  • Juan Rodriguez: Chi Chi, The Clown Prince of the Tour, The Four-Stroke Penalty. Of course, he's universally known as Chi Chi, not Juan. "The Four-Stroke Penalty" is what some fellow pros called him, those who thought that being paired with him - due to the commotion his entertaining antics caused among the crowd - was detrimental to their own scores.
  • Bill Rogers: Buck or Panther
  • Barbara Romack: Barbie or L'il Tiger
  • Eduardo Romero: El Gato (The Cat)
  • Jennifer Rosales: J-Ro
  • Bob Rosburg: Rossie
  • Paul Runyan: Little Poison. He was 5-foot-7, 130 pounds - not particularly small for his era (the 1920s and 1930s). But he was a very short driver with one of the all-time great short games. Runyan's nickname was an adaption of the nickname of baseball player Lloyd "Little Poison" Waner to golf. (Waner was the little, and not quite as talented, brother of Paul "Big Poison" Waner, and both played for the Pittsburgh Pirates.)
  • So Yeon Ryu: Piggy
  • Doug Sanders: The Peacock of the Fairways, for his flashy attire.
  • Gene Sarazen: The Squire. The nickname arose, and stuck, after Sarazen bought a farm in New York.
  • Onnarin Sattayabanphot: Moo, which has nothing to do with cows. When she was born in Thailand, her family called her Moo - which means "little pig" - for her chubby cheeks.
  • Hee-Kyung Seo: Supermodel of the Fairways
  • Ronnie Shade: Right Down the Bloody Middle. Shade was an accomplished Scottish amateur, a multiple Walker Cup player, who turned pro at the relatively late age of 30 in 1968. His full name was Ronald David Bell Mitchell Shade. He was such a good driver of the ball that fellow pros joked his initials - RDBMS - stood for Right Down the Bloody Middle Shade.
  • Jiyai Shin: Chalk Line, for her great driving. Early in her career called "The Final Round Queen" for multiple come-from-behind wins.
  • Charlie Sifford: The Jackie Robinson of Golf (he broke golf's color barrier, becoming the first black PGA pro), Charlie Cigar or Little Horse.
  • Scott Simpson: Stimp. Given to him by Craig Stadler after Stadler heard an announcer mispronounce Simpson's name as "Stimpson."
  • Vijay Singh: Veej or The Big Fijian
  • Horton Smith: The Missouri Rover. The World Golf Hall of Fame says, "he earned the nickname the Missouri Rover by tirelessly travelling the country by car, train and even boat to get to tournaments." Also called "The Joplin Ghost."
  • Marilynn Smith: Miss Personality (not a sarcastic nickname; her charming, outgoing, friendly personality was admired by all) or Mom.
  • Sam Snead: Slammin' Sam or Slammer; Nude Knob, Nudie or Old Baldy. The first two because he was one of the long-hitters of his era; the last three because of a receding hairline that he almost always kept hidden under a hat.
  • Ed Sneed: Answer Man
  • Annika Sorenstam: Ms. 59 - first LPGA golfer to shoot 59 on tour.
  • Mike Souchak: Sooch, or Smokey the Bear (for his bear-like build).
  • Craig Stadler: The Walrus (Stads among friends)
  • Kevin Stadler: Smallrus
  • Jan Stephenson: Nana, because of how she looked after tour newcomers.
  • Payne Stewart: Avis. He won 11 times on the PGA Tour, but he finished second twice as often. Avis is the car rental company whose slogan used to be, "We're No. 2, so we try harder."
  • Frank Stranahan: The Toledo Strongman or Muscles
  • Louise Suggs: Miss Sluggs. Given to her by Bob Hope for her long game.
  • Peter Thomson: The Melbourne Tiger, Five Times (how often he won the British Open) or Thommo.
  • Felice Torza: Toy Tiger
  • Bob Toski: Mighty Mite or Mouse (he was 5-foot-3).
  • Walter Travis: The Old Man
  • Lee Trevino: Merry Mex or Super Mex
  • Bob Tway: Brillo, a reference to his wiry hair reminding some of a Brillo pad.
  • Howard Twitty: Tweety Bird
  • Will Turnesa: Willie the Wedge
  • Harry Vardon: The Stylist, Mr. Golf or Greyhound
  • Glenna Collett Vare: The Queen of American Golf
  • Ken Venturi: Silks
  • Camilo Villegas: Spiderman because, well, this.
  • George Von Elm: Gix
  • Bubba Watson: Freak Show
  • Tom Watson: Huck for his freckle-faced, gap-toothed visage. Early in his career was called Huckleberry Dillinger - an innocent looking assassin - by some sportswriters.
  • Tom Weiskopf: The Towering Inferno
  • Michelle Wie: The Big Wiesy
  • Craig Wood: No. 1 Wood or The Blond Bomber
  • Tiger Woods: Urkel. Of course, "Tiger" is a nickname, but it is used always by everyone as his name. Urkel was pinned on Tiger during his college days at Stanford, and is a reference to the nerdy main character of the television sitcom Family Matters.
  • Ian Woosnam: Woosie
  • Kermit Zarley: The Pro from the Moon or The Pro from Outer Space. He wasn't spacey or weird at all, he just had a funny-sounding name.
  • Larry Ziegler: Half Pay. When he won the 1969 Michigan Classic, tournament organizers didn't have the money to pay his first-place prize. The tour (actually, the Tournament Players Division of the PGA of America, which at that time ran the tour) dipped into its rainy day fund to pay him instead, but in two installments - half pay, and then the other half later.
  • Frank Zoeller: Fuzzy. A play on his initials - Frank Urban Zoeller, FUZ.
  • Richard Zokol: Disco. Given this nickname when, during the 1982 Greater Milwaukee Open, he put on headphones between shots to listen to music.