Grammy Awards Record of the Year Winners 1959 - 2014

01
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1959: Domenico Modugno - "Nel Blu, Dipinto Di Blu (Volare)"

Domenico Modugno

1959 to the Present

Record of the Year is one of the most prestigious awards presented at the Grammy Awards ceremony. The awards are presented in the year after the record was originally released. Click on the appropriate item to see details for that record and listen to a sound clip.

Domenico Modugno was one of the first Italian pop music stars to achieve fame internationally. "Nel Blu, Dipinto Di Blu (Volare)" took home the first Grammy Award for Record of the Year in 1959. The song was recorded by a wide number of artists including a very popular version by Dean Martin.

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02
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1960: Bobby Darin - "Mack the Knife"

"Mack the Knife" was composed in Germany by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill for the Threepenny Opera which opened onstage in Berlin in 1928. Bobby Darin recorded his version of "Mack the Knife" as part of a move away from teen idol status to a more adult sound. It was very successful hitting #1 on the pop singles chart and winning the Grammy Award for Record of the Year. Louis Armstrong recorded the first popular American version in 1954, but Bobby Darin's is considered to be the definitive "Mack the Knife."

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03
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1961: Percy Faith Orchestra - "Theme From 'A Summer Place'"

The "Theme From 'A Summer Place'" was the first movie theme to win a Grammy for Record of the Year. The movie is all but forgotten, but Percy Faith's string-drenched theme remains familiar. The song was a #1 hit on the pop singles chart.

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04
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1962: Henry Mancini - "Moon River"

"Moon River" was written for the film Breakfast at Tiffany's. Audrey Hepburn sings the song in the movie, but Henry Mancini's orchestral version is just as well known. Audrey Hepburn's version of the song was not available to the general public on a recording until after her death in 1993.

Henry Mancini won an amazing 20 Grammy Awards in his long career including 5 for the music from Breakfast at Tiffany's alone.

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05
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1963: Tony Bennett - "I Left My Heart in San Francisco"

Tony Bennett was a successful pop singer in the early 1950's before the advent of rock-n-roll. His popularity faded somewhat in the late 1950's, but in 1962 he recorded "I Left My Heart in San Francisco," a song written in 1954 by George Cory and Douglas Cross, two relatively unknown songwriters. Bennett's recording was not a huge chart hit, but it stuck around on national music charts for over 9 months. Eventually, "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" became a pop standard, Tony Bennett's most recognized record, and San Francisco's signature song.

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06
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1964: Henry Mancini - "Days of Wine and Roses"

In 1964 Henry Mancini became the first performer to win 2 Grammy Awards for Record of the Year. His second victory was for the theme from the riveting movie about the destructive power of alcoholism - Days of Wine and Roses. The song has been recorded by a wide range of performers, but Andy Williams' version is probably best known.

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07
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1965: Stan Getz and Astrud Gilberto - "The Girl From Ipanema"

Stan Getz is one of the greatest jazz tenor saxophone players of all time. His recording of "The Girl From Ipanema" helped popularize the sound of bossa nova, a form of Brazilian music. Ipanema is a fashionable district in Rio de Janeiro. The song was written by Antonio Carlos Jobim, often considered a founder of bossa nova. Joao Gilberto and his wife Astrud often collaborated with Jobim in spreading the sound of bossa nova.

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08
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1966: Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass - "A Taste of Honey"

"A Taste of Honey" was a hit single from the album Whipped Cream and Other Delights by Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass. The album's cover is one of the more memorable album covers from the 1960's. It features an apparently nude model covered almost entirely in whipped cream.

09
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1967: Frank Sinatra - "Strangers in the Night"

"Strangers in the Night" was Frank Sinatra's first #1 hit pop single in 11 years when it appeared on the charts in 1966. It was the apex of a powerful comeback by one of the most popular pop vocalists of all time.

10
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1968: The 5th Dimension - "Up, Up and Away"

The 5th Dimension's music was a unique blend of orchestral pop, soul, and lite psychedelia. "Up, Up and Away" reached the top 10 of the pop singles chart and helped put both the 5th Dimension and songwriter Jimmy Webb on the pop map.

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11
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1969: Simon and Garfunkel - "Mrs. Robinson"

"Mrs. Robinson" was the first Record of the Year winner that could claim to have ties to rock music. The song and the film it accompanied, The Graduate, both powerfully capture the sense of disconnection between generations in the late 1960's. It was the first of 3 Record of the Year awards won by Paul Simon, one half of the duo Simon and Garfunkel.

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12
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1970: The 5th Dimension - "Aquarius / Let the Sunshine In"

The musical Hair helped define the entire hippie movement for mainstream audiences, and the 5th Dimension's medley of two songs from the show brought the music of Hair to every corner of the nation. The 5th Dimension's single sold 3 million copies and spent 6 weeks at #1 on the pop singles chart as well as winning a second Record of the Year Grammy for the group.

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13
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1971: Simon and Garfunkel - "Bridge Over Troubled Water"

"Bridge Over Troubled Water" is a powerful song and is one of the most comforting songs of all time. It was the title song for the last album by Simon and Garfunkel before they went their separate ways. Aretha Franklin and Elvis Presley have recorded stirring versions of "Bridge Over Troubled Water." It hit #1 on the pop singles chart and remained there for 6 weeks.

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14
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1972: Carole King - "It's Too Late"

Carole King seemed an unlikely candidate to become an icon of the early 1970's singer/songwriter movement. She was one of the most successful songwriters in pop music in the 1960's, but her success came from the "manufactured" pop of the Brill Building. She was one of the songwriters behind such classics "The Loco-Motion," "One Fine Day," and "Will You Love Me Tomorrow." When her breakthrough as an artist finally arrived, it was a quiet, introspective album called Tapestry. The album was a stunning success and stayed on the album chart for over 6 years. "It's Too Late" reached #1 on the pop singles chart.

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15
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1973: Roberta Flack - "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face"

By 1972 Roberta Flack had released two solo albums but commercial success eluded her. While her blend of jazz and folk vocal stylings with an element of classic soul was unique and engaging, it was difficult to find the right audience. Then Clint Eastwood used her version of "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face," a song by Scottish folk singer Ewan MacColl, as the backdrop for a scene in his movie Play Misty for Me. Public demand for the song skyrocketed, and a single release of "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" became the biggest pop hit of the year.

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16
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1974: Roberta Flack - "Killing Me Softly With His Song"

Roberta Flack became the first artist to win Record of the Year two consecutive years when her second #1 pop hit "Killing Me Softly With His Song" took home the prize in 1974. The song was written by Charles Fox and Norman Gimbel and inspired by a poem by Lori Lieberman titled "Killing Me Softly With His Blues" that was written after she saw Don McLean perform live. A cover version of "Killing Me Softly" by the Fugees was one of the top hit songs of the 1990's.

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17
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1975: Olivia Newton-John - "I Honestly Love You"

"I Honestly Love You" was Olivia Newton-John's breakthrough single in the U.S. It hit #1 on the pop charts and has become one of her most loved classics. A re-recorded version of the song featuring Babyface on backing vocals hit the pop singles chart in 1998. It was Olivia Newton-John's first appearance in the pop charts after a 6 year absence.

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18
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1976: Captain and Tennille - "Love Will Keep Us Together"

Daryl Dragon (The Captain) and Toni Tennille both came from strong musical families and were somewhat successful in musical endeavors before they decided to team up, both professionally and romantically. The pair was clearly more successful than the sum of its parts. They recorded a cover version of Neil Sedaka's "Love Will Keep Us Together," even including the phrase "Sedaka is back" in the fadeout of the song, that became the biggest pop hit of 1975. 30 years later they are still a couple and continue to be involved in performing and recording music.

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19
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1977: George Benson - "This Masquerade"

George Benson was a well respected guitarist in jazz circles when he released his album Breezin'. Most of the album was typical of his style of r&b tinged soft jazz guitar work, but the only song on the album to feature his vocals, "This Masquerade," became an unexpected pop hit. The album eventually went to #1 on the charts, and George Benson had a new role as an r&b vocalist.

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20
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1978: Eagles - "Hotel California"

"Hotel California" has some of the most eerie lyrics of any major pop hit song. Some believed that the tale of a hotel where "you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave" had Satanic overtones, but this was denied by the group. It is much more likely a tale of the drugs and excess the band members found in mid-1970's southern California. In addition to the fascinating lyrics, "Hotel California" contains stunning guitar interplay courtesy of Don Felder and Joe Walsh.

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21
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1979: Billy Joel - "Just the Way You Are"

"Just the Way You Are" was a breakthrough hit single for Billy Joel. Previously, his most successful hit single had been "Piano Man" which reached #25 on the pop singles chart. "Just the Way You Are," written for Joel's now former wife, Elizabeth, climbed clear into the top 3. The song features a memorable saxophone solo from jazz performer Phil Woods.

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22
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1980: The Doobie Brothers - "What a Fool Believes"

The Doobie Brothers began life as a band named after slang for a marijuana joint playing songs that have gone down in pop music history as album rock staples. Among their hits were "Black Water" and "Long Train Running." With band leader Tom Johnston ailing in the mid-1970's, the band turned to former Steely Dan guitarist Jeff Baxter and keyboardist-singer Michael McDonald for leadership. The band was restructured with a soft rock sound dominated by McDonald's distinctive vocals. "What a Fool Believes" is this configuration of the band at its peak. It was the Doobie Brothers' sole #1 pop hit single aside from "Black Water."

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23
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1981: Christopher Cross - "Sailing"

Christopher Cross rocketed to fame in 1980 with his self-titled debut album. He swept the 1981 Grammy Awards winning 5 citations including Record of the Year for "Sailing." The following year he achieved another major milestone winning an Academy Award for Best Song with his "Arthur's Theme (Best That You Can Do)" from the Dudley Moore classic Arthur. His second album Another Page was released in 1983, but it failed to repeat the success of his first collection. After that album's "Think of Laura" left the pop singles chart, Christoper Cross never reached the pop top 40 again.

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24
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1982: Kim Carnes - "Bette Davis Eyes"

"Bette Davis Eyes" began life as a song co-written by Donna Weiss and Jackie DeShannon. A recording of it was included on Jackie DeShannon's 1974 album New Arrangement, but it was not until Kim Carnes released her version in 1981 that the song became a hit. The brilliantly atmospheric arrangement complemented Carnes' raspy delivery and "Bette Davis Eyes" spent 9 weeks at the top of the pop singles chart. Bette Davis reportedly thanked Kim Carnes for making her a part of "modern history."

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25
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1983: Toto - "Rosanna"

Toto are probably the most successful "faceless" band made up of mostly studio musicians ever. Their music is considered by many to be the epitome of early 80's soft rock. "Rosanna" was written about keyboardist Steve Porcaro's girlfriend, actress Rosanna Arquette. It helped lead the group to 6 Grammy Awards in 1983.

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26
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1984: Michael Jackson - "Beat It"

Michael Jackson's "Beat It," the 3rd single from Thriller, the bestselling album of all time, was groundbreaking in multiple ways. The combination of r&b and rock via the guitar solo contributions of Eddie Van Halen almost singlehandedly brought down the color barriers on MTV. The video's choreography set a new standard for dancing in a music video influencing videos for years to come, and Michael Jackson achieved his goal of providing an inspiring statement against street violence.

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27
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1985: Tina Turner - "What's Love Got to Do With It?"

"What's Love Got to Do With It?" was the lynchpin of one of the most amazing comebacks in the history of popular music. Tina Turner first hit the pop charts with her husband Ike in 1960. They reached their peak with the top 5 hit "Proud Mary" in 1971. However, amid incidents of spousal abuse, the two went their separate ways by the mid-1970's. Tina Turner released solo albums but failed to return to the pop singles chart. 13 years after "Proud Mary," "What's Love Got to Do With It?" gave her the first and only #1 pop hit of her career. It set the stage for many more years of pop hit singles and cemented her status as a pop music icon.

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28
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1986: USA For Africa - "We Are the World"

"We Are the World" is the American response to the success of Bob Geldof's project "Do They Know It's Christmas?" in raising awareness of and providing assistance to Ethiopians starving from the impact of famine on their country. The effort was first put forward by Harry Belafonte and his manger Ken Kragen. Quincy Jones, Michael Jackson, and Lionel Richie were soon brought into the project and ultimately a who's who of pop music participated. The project raised over $50 million to aid starving people in Africa.

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29
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1987: Steve Winwood - "Higher Love"

Steve Winwood was a well-seasoned pop music veteran by the time he became a solo superstar in the mid-1980's. As a teenager he was the soulful voice of the Spencer Davis Group with hits like "Gimme Some Lovin'" and "I'm a Man." Later he was the keyboardist for the legendary jazz-rock group Traffic, and he took part in Blind Faith, the iconic rock supergroup with Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker, and Rick Grech. His first solo album, Arc of a Diver, released in 1980, included the fresh, clean pop of "While You See a Chance." "Higher Love" was the first single, a #1 pop hit, from the album Back in the High Life, and it made Steve Winwood a pop superstar.

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30
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1988: Paul Simon - "Graceland"

"Graceland" gave Paul Simon his 3rd Record of the Year Grammy Award. The first two he earned with Art Garfunkel. Initially, Paul Simon's Graceland project was controversial. He traveled to South Africa to record with South African musicians despite worldwide boycotts of the apartheid-based government. However, the United Nations Anti-Apartheid Committee supported his efforts since he only recorded with black South African musicians and did not collaborate with the government in any way. The album is a classic and the song, detailing an allegorical visit to Elvis Presley's legendary home, remains a powerful achievement.

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31
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1989: Bobby McFerrin - "Don't Worry, Be Happy"

"Don't Worry, Be Happy" is the first a capella song ever to reach #1 on the pop singles chart. The song became the subject of controversy when George Bush adopted it as a campaign theme but later dropped it after McFerrin protested. The song's simple message is often referenced to criticize naively rosy outlooks on the world.

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32
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1990: Bette Midler - "Wind Beneath My Wings"

"Wind Beneath My Wings" is the theme song for Beaches, the ultimate movie tear-jerker. Bette Midler had not scored a top 10 single for nearly 10 years, before the reverent "Wind Beneath My Wings" soared to #1. Recorded by a wide range of artists and used as music for many special occasions, "Wind Beneath My Wings" is well on its way to becoming a pop standard.

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33
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1991: Phil Collins - "Another Day in Paradise"

The 1990's began with Phil Collins' "Another Day in Paradise," a sobering reminder of the problem of homelessness, at #1 on the pop singles chart. Collins successful effort at social consciousness was a deliberate attempt to remind his fans that he could sing of weighty issues as well as frothy pop numbers like "Two Hearts" and "Groovy Kind of Love."

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34
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1992: Natalie Cole with Nat King Cole - "Unforgettable"

"Unforgettable" gave Natalie Cole the opportunity to fulfill a lifelong dream - singing on record with her father. It is the title song from a collection of tributes to her father, the celebrated performer Nat King Cole. Studio wizardry put together vocal tracks from Nat King Cole with newly sung tracks by Natalie Cole to create a nearly seamless duet.

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35
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1993: Eric Clapton - "Tears in Heaven"

In 1991 Eric Clapton's 4 year-old son fell to his death from a window in Clapton's 53rd floor New York City apartment. The grief-stricken father wrote "Tears in a Heaven" as a tribute. His particularly moving performance of the song on the Unplugged album was the version cited by Grammy voters for Record of the Year.

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36
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1993: Whitney Houston - "I Will Always Love You"

By 1992 it was hard to imagine what greater achievements in pop music Whitney Houston could reach. She already had 9 #1 pop singles to her credit, and then she was given "I Will Always Love You," a country hit in the 1970's written and recorded by Dolly Parton, to sing for the soundtrack to her first movie The Bodyguard. The movie was a hit, but the song became one of the biggest hit singles of all time. The song spent 14 weeks at #1 on the pop singles chart, a record at that time.

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37
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1995: Sheryl Crow - "All I Wanna Do"

The road to the release of Sheryl Crow's first album Tuesday Night Music Club was winding and twisting. She had served time as backup singer for both Michael Jackson and Don Henley before signing a solo recording contract with A&M Records in 1990. Unfortunately, she was displeased by the recordings created for the intended first album. These songs were shelved and Crow entered a period of deep depression. Eventually, she began meeting weekly with other aspiring musicians sharing song ideas and sometimes writing songs together in what became known as the "Tuesday Night Music Club" of her album title. At first it seemed the album would not be a success, but then "All I Wanna Do" took off in radio airplay eventually hitting #1 on the pop singles chart.

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38
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1996: Seal - "Kiss From a Rose"

"Kiss From a Rose" first appeared on Seal's second self-titled album, but it did not begin climbing the pop singles chart until it was included on the soundtrack to the movie Batman Forever. The song eventually hit #1.

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39
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1997: Eric Clapton - "Change the World"

"Change the World" brought together the r&b talents of songwriter/producer/performer Babyface and the classic rock skills of Eric Clapton. The song was included on the soundtrack to the movie Phenomenon starring John Travolta.

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40
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1998: Shawn Colvin - "Sunny Came Home"

"Sunny Came Home" is the song that brought folk pop singer/songwriter Shawn Colvin to the attention of mainstream pop audiences. The chilling tale of a woman returning home for vengeance reached the top 10 of the pop singles chart. Shawn Colvin was already a multiple Grammy Award winner when she took home the Record of the Year award for "Sunny Came Home."

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41
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1999: Celine Dion - "My Heart Will Go On (Love Theme from 'Titanic')"

Celine Dion's expansive voice was the perfect choice for a love theme for the epic film Titanic. However, the movie's director James Cameron rejected the idea of a song playing over the end credits when it was first discussed. Reportedly, Celine Dion's voice changed his mind. "My Heart Will Go On" went straight to #1 on the pop singles chart and also picked up an Academy Award for Best Song From a Motion Picture to add to the Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

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42
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2000: Santana featuring Rob Thomas - "Smooth"

Few in the music industry would have predicted that Rob Thomas, lead vocalist with the post-grunge group Matchbox Twenty, would be the catalyst for the first chart-topping single ever by the venerable Latin rock group Santana. Thomas co-wrote and sang "Smooth" while accompanied by Carlos Santana's inimitable guitar work. The combination was magic, and "Smooth" became one of the biggest pop singles of all time.

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43
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2001: U2 - "Beautiful Day"

U2 released the single "Beautiful Day" far enough in advance of the album All That You Can't Leave Behind that "Beautiful Day" met the deadline to qualify for the 2001 Grammy Awards, but the album was not eligible until the following year. "Beautiful Day" was U2's most rousing anthem in more than a decade and picked up the Grammy for Record of the Year.

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44
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2002: U2 - "Walk On"

For the first time in the history of the Grammy Awards, a recording act won the Record of the Year award in consecutive years for songs from the same album. Since U2's album All That You Can't Leave Behind was released after the first single "Beautiful Day," it failed to beat the deadline date to qualify for the 2001 Grammy Awards. The single did qualify and "Beautiful Day" won the 2001 Grammy for Record of the Year. The following year "Walk On," also from All That You Can't Leave Behind took the Record of the Year Grammy Award. Between the two years music from All That You Can't Leave Behind ultimately won 7 Grammy Awards.

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45
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2003: Norah Jones - "Don't Know Why"

Norah Jones, the daughter of Indian music legend Ravi Shankar, thrilled Grammy voters with her warm, intimate blend of jazz, blues and pop. "Don't Know Why" was only a minor pop hit single, but it reached the top 10 of the adult contemporary chart and helped drive the album Come Away With Me to #1 on the album chart and, ultimately, 18 million in worldwide sales.

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46
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2004: Coldplay - "Clocks"

The failure of "Clocks" to reach the top 10 on the pop singles chart would mislead the casual chart observer into thinking the song failed to become well-known to pop audiences. Throughout 2003 the song was nearly ubiquitous. It was used in television themes, movies, and for sports events. The opening piano riff is one of the most memorable pop instrumental hooks of the past decade.

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47
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2005: Ray Charles and Norah Jones - "Here We Go Again"

Following the death of musical legend Ray Charles, the Grammy Awards were swept by an outpouring of gratitude for his contributions that resulted in 8 awards for Ray Charles' final album Genius Loves Company, a collection of duets with other prominent recording artists. "Here We Go Again," his duet with Norah Jones, winner of the 2003 Record of the Year Award, was singled out for particular praise as the year's top recording.

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2006: Green Day - "Boulevard of Broken Dreams"

Green Day's album American Idiot was a landmark pop-punk album exploring alienation and the struggle for identity in a post-9/11 world. "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" reached #1 on the pop singles chart and was heralded as bringing intelligent rock back to the pop mainstream.

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49
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2007: Dixie Chicks - "Not Ready to Make Nice"

Dixie Chicks - Not Ready to Make Nice
Dixie Chicks - Not Ready to Make Nice. Courtesy Columbia Records

The 2007 Grammy Awards took place at a time when frustration among the American public about the conduct of the Iraq War was at a fever pitch. This was a ripe atmosphere for the Dixie Chicks' defiant stand against perceived attacks from the George W. Bush administration to sweep the awards. They became the first recording act since Eric Clapton in 1993 to take home the awards for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Album of the Year.

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50
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2008: Amy Winehouse - "Rehab"

Amy Winehouse -
Amy Winehouse - "Rehab". Courtesy Island Records

Despite ongoing tabloid stories of her difficulties with drugs and relationships, the stellar, gravelly voiced performance of Amy Winehouse charmed Grammy voters. The lyrics are autobiographical and discuss Amy Winehouse's refusal to go to rehab for drinking problems. In addition to Record of the Year, "Rehab" also took home the Song of the Year Award as well as the UK's prestigious Ivor Novello Award.

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51
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2009: Robert Plant and Allison Krauss - "Please Read the Letter"

Robert Plant and Allison Krauss -
Robert Plant and Allison Krauss - "Please Read the Letter". Courtesy Rounder Records

Raising Sand, the album collaboration between Led Zeppelin's lead vocalist Robert Plant and bluegrass star Allison Krauss, dominated the 2009 Grammy Awards winning five trophies. The music is sparkling folk / Americana. This is the sound of two musical legends working together effortlessly.

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52
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2010: Kings of Leon - "Use Somebody"

Kings of Leon - Use Somebody
Kings of Leon - Use Somebody. Courtesy RCA

2009 was the year that Kings of Leon became worldwide pop superstars. They had a major breakthrough when the single "Sex On Fire" roared to #1 in the UK in 2008. It took "Use Somebody" to reach a massive audience at home in the US. It is anthemic pop-rock that pleases the widest possible audience. The song peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100.

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53
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2011: Lady Antebellum - "Need You Now"

Lady Antebellum - Need You Now
Lady Antebellum - Need You Now. Courtesy Capitol Nashville

In 2011 Lady Antebellum released a crossover country smash "Need You Now." It became the second country song to win the awards for both Record of the Year and Song of the Year at the Grammy Awards. "Need You Now" peaked at #1 on the country, adult pop, and adult contemporary charts while going to #2 on the Billboard Hot 100. It has sold in excess of five million digital copies.

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54
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2012: Adele - "Rolling In the Deep"

Adele -
Adele - "Rolling In the Deep". Courtesy Columbia

"Rolling In the Deep" kicked off Adele's transformation into a superstar. She described the song as a "dark bluesy gospel disco tune." The subject matter relates the feelings of a woman scorned. It was the first single from the album 21 and hit #1 in countries around the world. In the US it spent seven weeks at the top and has sold more than seven million copies. "Rolling In the Deep" also took home Grammy Awards for Song of the Year and Best Music Video.

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55
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2013: Gotye featuring Kimbra - "Somebody That I Used To Know"

Gotye - Somebody That I Used To Know featuring Kimbra
Gotye - "Somebody That I Used To Know" featuring Kimbra. Courtesy Eleven

Belgian-Australian artist Gotye seemed to come out of nowhere with his #1 smash hit "Somebody That I Used To Know." It details relationship experiences that touched a chord with millions of listeners around the world. The use of a xylophone helps give "Somebody That I Used To Know" its distinctive sound. It reached #1 in more than 20 countries around the world and stayed eight weeks at the top in the US. 

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2014: Daft Punk featuring Pharrell Williams and Nile Rodgers - "Get Lucky"

Daft Punk -
Daft Punk - "Get Lucky". Courtesy Columbia

French dance music duo Daft Punk returned retro disco to the upper reaches of pop charts with "Get Lucky." Pharrell Williams provided the vocals and disco legend Nile Rodgers his distinctive guitar sound. It took approximately 18 months to complete the recording of "Get Lucky." The song spent five weeks at its peak of #2 on the Billboard Hot 100. In the UK it went all the way to #1.

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Lamb, Bill. "Grammy Awards Record of the Year Winners 1959 - 2014." ThoughtCo, Jan. 13, 2017, thoughtco.com/grammy-awards-record-of-the-year-beginning-1959-4122912. Lamb, Bill. (2017, January 13). Grammy Awards Record of the Year Winners 1959 - 2014. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/grammy-awards-record-of-the-year-beginning-1959-4122912 Lamb, Bill. "Grammy Awards Record of the Year Winners 1959 - 2014." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/grammy-awards-record-of-the-year-beginning-1959-4122912 (accessed December 11, 2017).