Hera (Juno)

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Marble Hera Statue

Hera Campana
Hera Campana. Public Domain. Courtesy of Wikipedia

Hera is the queen of the Greek gods, the wife and sister of the king of the heavens, Zeus. Among the Romans, Hera is known as Juno. She is a goddess of marriage.

Homer uses two epithets for Hera, cow-eyed and white-armed. In the story of the Trojan War, Hera strongly opposes the Trojans, while favoring the Greeks. Other foes who suffer at the hands of Hera are the women her husband seduces and their children.

In Rome, Hera, as Juno plays many roles and is part of the honored Capitoline Triad, along with Minerva and Jupiter.

This marble statue of Hera Campana in the Louvre is a Roman copy of a Hellenistic original. It may be from the second century A.D. (Information on the statue comes from Wikipedia.)

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Archaic Head of Hera

Archaic Head of Hera
Archaic Head of Hera. Clipart.com
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Kylix of Hera and Prometheus

Hera and Prometheus
Hera and Prometheus. Public Domain. Courtesy of Wikipedia

Red-figured Attic kylix made in the early 5th century B.C., from Vulci, Etruria. The scene shows a seated Hera and Prometheus. (Information from Wikipedia.)

Hera the marriage goddess had given birth to Hephaistos without the help of her husband Zeus. Since Hephaistos was ugly, the goddess threw him from Mt. Olympus. In revenge he built her a magical throne as a gift. Once she sat in it, she couldn't get back up. This scene shows Hera talking with Prometheus while glued to her throne.

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Frieze of Hera and Zeus

Frieze of Hera and Zeus
Frieze of Hera and Zeus. Clipart.com
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Marble Head of Hera with Diadem

Hera Barberini Chiaramonti
Hera Barberini Chiaramonti. Public Domain. Courtesy of Wikipedia.

Roman copy of a Greek 5th century "Barbarini Hera" from the Museo Chiaramonti. (Information from WIkipedia.)

A Roman copy from the Imperial Era.

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Juno Regina

Juno Regina Denarius from 220 A.D.
Juno Regina Denarius from 220 A.D. Public Domain. Courtesy of Wikipedia.

Juno Regina on a denarius from 220 A.D. On the other side is Julia Soemias Augusta.

The Roman equivalent of Hera, the goddess Juno was honored in various aspects. As Juno Regina she is the queen of the gods and the wife of Jupiter/Zeus.