'Hamlet' Quotes

William Shakespeare's Famous Play

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Lombardi, Esther. "'Hamlet' Quotes." ThoughtCo, May. 16, 2014, thoughtco.com/hamlet-quotes-739999. Lombardi, Esther. (2014, May 16). 'Hamlet' Quotes. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/hamlet-quotes-739999 Lombardi, Esther. "'Hamlet' Quotes." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/hamlet-quotes-739999 (accessed September 19, 2017).
Hamlet
Hamlet. Oxford University Press
Hamlet is a famous tragedy by William Shakespeare. The play is filled with death and suicide, madness, incest, and the supernatural. Hamlet's father has been murdered, which inspires a whole series of events--bent on revenge and destined to bring destruction to all. Hamlet is one of the most popular plays of William Shakespeare. Here are a few quotes from the play. Also, be sure to take a look at the 'Hamlet' Study Guide.
  • "Not a mouse stirring."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.1

  • "In the most high and palmy state of Rome,
    A little ere the mightiest Julius fell,
    The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead
    Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.1

  • "And then it started like a guilty thing
    Upon a fearful summons."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.1

  • "It faded on the crowing of the cock.
    Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes
    Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated,
    The bird of dawning singeth all night long:
    And then, they say, no spirit dare stir abroad;
    The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike,
    No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm,
    So hallow'd and so gracious is the time."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.1

  • "But, look, the morn, in russet mantle clad,
    Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastward hill."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.1

  • "The memory be green."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "With an auspicious and a dropping eye,
    With mirth in funeral and with dirge in marriage,
    In equal scale weighing delight and dole."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "The head is not more native to the heart."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "A little more than kin, and less than kind."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "All that lives must die,
    Passing through nature to eternity."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "But I have that within which passeth show;
    These but the trappings and the suits of woe."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "'Tis a fault to Heaven,
    A fault against the dead, a fault to nature,
    To reason most absurd."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "O, that this too too solid flesh would melt,
    Thaw and resolve itself into a dew!
    Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd
    His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! God!
    How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
    Seem to me all the uses of this world!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "That it should come to this!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "Why, she would hang on him,
    As if increase of appetite had grown
    By what it fed on."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "Frailty, thy name is woman!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "A little month."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "Like Niobe, all tears."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "My father's brother, but no more like my father
    Than I to Hercules."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "It is not, nor it cannot come to good."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "A truant disposition, good my lord."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "Thrift, thrift, Horatio! the funeral baked meats
    Did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "In my mind's eye, Horatio."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "He was a man, take him for all in all,
    I shall not look upon his like again."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "Season your admiration for a while."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "In the dead vast and middle of the night."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "A countenance more in sorrow than in anger."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "All is not well;
    I doubt some foul play."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "Foul deeds will rise,
    Though all the earth o'erwhelm them, to men's eyes."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.2

  • "A violet in the youth of primy nature,
    Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting,
    The perfume and suppliance of a minute."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "And keep you in the rear of your affection,
    Out of the shot and danger of desire,
    The chariest maid is prodigal enough
    If she unmasks her beauty to the moon."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "Do not, as some ungracious pastors do,
    Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven;
    Whiles, like a puffed and reckless libertine,
    Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads,
    And recks not his own rede."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "Give thy thoughts no tongue."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
    Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "The apparel oft proclaims the man."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
    For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
    And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "This above all: to thine own self be true,
    And it must follow, as the night the day,
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "You speak like a green girl,
    Unsifted in such perilous circumstance."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "Springes to catch woodcocks."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "When the blood burns, how prodigal the soul
    Lends the tongue vows."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "Be somewhat scanter of your maiden presence."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.3

  • "It is a nipping and an eager air."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.4

  • "But to my mind, - though I am native here
    And to the manner born, - it is a custom
    More honoured in the breach than the observance."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.4

  • "Angels and ministers of grace, defend us!
    Be thou a spirit of health or goblin damned,
    Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell,
    Be thy intents wicked or charitable,
    Thou comest in such a questionable shape
    That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet,
    King, father, royal Dane: O, answer me!
    Let me not burst in ignorance, but tell
    Why thy canonized bones, hearsed in death,
    Have burst their cerements; why the sepulchre,
    Wherein we saw thee quietly inurn'd,
    Hath oped his ponderous and marble jaws
    To cast thee up again. What may this mean,
    That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel
    Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon,
    Making night hideous, and we fools of nature
    So horridly to shake our disposition
    With thoughts beyond the reaches of our souls?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.4

  • "I do not set my life at a pin's fee;
    And set my soul, what can it do to that,
    Being a thing immortal as itself?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.4

  • "Unhand me, gentlemen.
    By heaven, I'll make a ghost of him that lets me!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.4

  • "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.4

  • "I am thy father's spirit;
    Doomed for a certain term to walk the night,
    And for the day confined to fast in fires,
    Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature
    Are burnt and purged away. But that I am forbid
    To tell the secrets of my prison-house,
    I could a tale unfold, whose lightest word
    Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,
    Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,
    Thy knotted and combined locks to part
    And each particular hair to stand an end,
    Like quills upon the fretful porpentine:
    But this eternal blazon must not be
    To ears of flesh and blood. - List, list, O, list!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.5

  • "Revenge his foul and most unnatural murder."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.5

  • "Murder most foul."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.5

  • "O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.5

  • "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
    Than are dreamt of in your philosophy."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.5

  • "Rest, rest, perturbed spirit!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.5

  • "The time is out of joint: O cursed spite,
    That ever I was born to set it right!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.5

  • "The flash and outbreak of a fiery mind,
    A savageness in unreclaimed blood."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.1

  • "By indirections find directions out."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.1

  • "This is the very ecstasy of love."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.1

  • "Brevity is the soul of wit."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "To define true madness,
    What is't but to be nothing else but mad?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "More matter, with less art."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "Find out the cause of this effect,
    Or rather say, the cause of this defect,
    For this effect defective comes by cause."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "Doubt thou the stars are fire;
    Doubt that the sun doth move;
    Doubt truth to be a liar;
    But never doubt I love."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "To be honest as this world goes, is to be one man picked out of ten thousand."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "Words, words, words."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "They have a plentiful lack of wit."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "Though this be madness, yet there is method in't."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "You cannot, sir, take from me anything that I will more willingly part withal; except my life, except my life, except my life. "
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "A dream itself is but a shadow."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "Beggar that I am, I am even poor in thanks."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "It goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! How infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? man delights not me; no, nor woman neither, though, by your smiling, you seem to say so."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "He that plays the king shall be welcome; his majesty shall have tribute of me."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "There is something in this more than natural, if philosophy could find it out."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "I know a hawk from a handsaw."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "The best actors in the world, either for tragedy, comedy, history, pastoral, pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral, tragical-historical, tragical-comical-historical-pastoral, scene individable, or poet unlimited."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "The play, I remember, pleased not the million; 't was caviare to the general."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "Good my lord, will you see the players well bestowed? Do you hear, let them be well used; for they are the abstract and brief chronicles of the time: after your death you were better have a bad epitaph than their ill report while you live."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "Use every man after his desert, and who should 'scape whipping?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba,
    That he should weep for her?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "He would drown the stage with tears,
    And cleave the general ear with horrid speech,
    Make mad the guilty, and appal the free,
    Confound the ignorant, and amaze, indeed,
    The very faculties of eyes and ears."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "Bloody, bawdy villain!
    Remorseless, treacherous, lecherous, kindles villain!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "I have heard,
    That guilty creatures sitting at a play
    Have by the very cunning of the scene
    Been struck so to the soul that presently
    They have proclaimed their malefactions;
    For murder, though it have no tongue, will speak
    With most miraculous organ."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "The devil hath power
    To assume a pleasing shape."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "Abuses me to damn me."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "The play's the thing
    Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 2.2

  • "With devotion's visage
    And pious action we do sugar o'er
    The devil himself."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
    No more; and by a sleep to say we end
    The heartache and the thousand natural shocks
    That flesh is heir to,-'tis a consummation
    Devoutly to be wished. To die, to sleep;
    To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub:
    For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
    When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
    Must give us pause: there's the respect
    That makes calamity of so long life;
    For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
    The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
    The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
    The insolence of office and the spurns
    That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
    When he himself might his quietus make
    With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear,
    To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
    But that the dread of something after death,
    The undiscovered country from whose bourn
    No traveller returns, puzzles the will
    And makes us rather bear those ills we have
    Than fly to others that we know not of?
    Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
    And thus the native hue of resolution
    Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
    And enterprises of great pith and moment
    With this regard their currents turn awry,
    And lose the name of action."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "Nymph, in thy orisons
    Be all my sins remembered."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "I am myself indifferent honest."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "Get thee to a nunnery: why wouldst thou be a breeder of sinners?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "Be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny. Get thee to a nunnery, go."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "I have heard of your paintings too, well enough; God has given you one face, and you make yourselves another."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "I say we will have no more marriages."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!
    The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's eye, tongue, sword;
    The expectancy and rose of the fair state,
    The glass of fashion and the mould of form,
    The observed of all observers!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "Now see that noble and most sovereign reason,
    Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.1

  • "O, woe is me,
    To have seen what I have seen, see what I see!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3. 1

  • "Speak the speech, I pray you, as I have pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue; but if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief the towncrier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "A robustious periwig-pated fellow."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "I would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it out-herods Herod."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3. 2
  • "Suit the action to the word, the word to the action."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "To hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "I have thought some of Nature's journeymen had made men and not made them well, they imitated humanity so abominably."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp,
    And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee
    Where thrift may follow fawning."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Give me that man
    That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
    In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
    As I do thee."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "And my imaginations are as foul
    As Vulcan's stithy."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "The chameleon's dish: I eat the air, promise-crammed; you cannot feed capons so."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Here's metal more attractive."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Nay, then, let the devil wear black, for I'll have a suit of sables."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "There's hope a great man's memory may outlive his life half a year."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "For, O, for, O, the hobby-horse is forgot."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Marry, this is miching mallecho; it means mischief."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Our wills and fates do so contrary run That our devices still are overthrown."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "The lady doth protest too much, methinks."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Let the galled jade wince, our withers are unwrung."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "What! frighted with false fire?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Why, let the stricken deer go weep, The hart ungalled play;
    For some must watch, while some must sleep: So runs the world away."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "'Tis as easy as lying."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "You would play upon me; you would seem to know my stops; you would pluck out the heart of my mystery; you would sound me from my lowest note to the top of my compass."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Do you think I am easier to be played on than a pipe?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Very like a whale."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "They fool me to the top of my bent."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "By and by is easily said."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "'Tis now the very witching time of night,
    When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out
    Contagion to this world: now could I drink hot blood.
    And do such bitter business as the day
    Would quake to look on."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "Let me be cruel, not unnatural;
    I will speak daggers to her, but use none."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.2

  • "O, my offence is rank, it smells to heaven."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.3

  • "My words fly up, my thoughts remain below:
    Words without thoughts never to heaven go."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.3

  • "Dead, for a ducat, dead!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "A bloody deed! almost as bad, good mother,
    As kill a king, and marry with his brother."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "Thou wretched, rash, intruding fool, farewell!
    I took thee for thy better."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "A rhapsody of words."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "You cannot call it love, for at your age
    The hey-day in the blood is tame, it's humble,
    And waits upon the judgment."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "Speak no more;
    Thou turn'st mine eyes into my very soul"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "Nay, but to live
    In the rank sweat of an unseamed bed,
    Stewed in corruption, honeying and making love
    Over the nasty sty."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "A cutpurse of the empire and the rule,
    That from a shelf the precious diadem stole,
    And put it in his pocket!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "A king of shreds and patches."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "Mother, for love of grace,
    Lay not that flattering unction to your soul."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "Confess yourself to heaven;
    Repent what's past; avoid what is to come."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "Assume a virtue, if you have it not.
    That monster, custom, who all sense doth eat,
    Of habits devil, is angel yet in this."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "I must be cruel, only to be kind."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "For 'tis the sport to have the engineer
    Hoist with his own petar."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 3.4

  • "Diseases desperate grown
    By desperate appliance are relieved,
    Or not at all."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.3

  • "A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.3

  • "We go to gain a little patch of ground,
    That hath in it no profit but the name."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.4

  • "Sure, he that made us with such large discourse,
    Looking before and after, gave us not
    That capability and godlike reason
    To fust in us unused."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.4

  • "Rightly to be great
    Is not to stir without great argument,
    But greatly to find quarrel in a straw
    When honour's at the stake."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.4

  • "How should I your true love know
    From another one?
    By his cockle hat and staff,
    And his sandal shoon."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "He is dead and gone, lady,
    He is dead and gone,
    At his head a green-grass tuft;
    At his heels a stone."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "Lord! we know what we are, but know not what we may be."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "To-morrow is Saint Valentine's day,
    All in the morning betime."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "Then up he rose, and donn'd his clothes."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "Come, my coach! Good-night ladies; good night, sweet ladies; good night."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "When sorrows come, they come not single spies,
    But in battalions."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "There's such divinity doth hedge a king,
    That treason can but peep to what it would."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance; pray, love, remember: and there is pansies, that's for thoughts."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "His beard was as white as snow."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "His means of death, his obscure burial,
    No trophy, sword, nor hatchment o'er his bones,
    No noble rite nor formal ostentation."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "And where the offence is let the great axe fall."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.5

  • "A very riband in the cap of youth."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.7

  • "One woe doth tread upon another's heel,
    So fast they follow."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.7

  • "There is a willow grows aslant a brook,
    that shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream;
    There with fantastic garlands did she come
    Of crow-flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples
    That liberal shepherds give a grosser name,
    But our cold maids do dead men's fingers call them:
    There, on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
    Clambering to hang, an envious sliver broke;
    When down her weedy trophies and herself
    Fell in the weeping brook. Her clothes spread wide,
    And, mermaid-like, awhile they bore her up;
    Which time she chanted snatches of old tunes..."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.7

  • "Too much of water hast thou, poor Ophelia,
    And therefore I forbid my tears; but yet
    It is our trick, nature her custom holds,
    Let shame say what it will."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet, 4.7

  • "Is she to be buried in Christian burial that willfully seeks her own salvation?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "There is no ancient gentlemen but gardeners, ditchers and grave-makers."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "Cudgel thy brains no more about it, for your dull ass will not mend his pace with beating."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "But age, with his stealing steps
    Hath clawed me in his clutch."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "Why may not that be the skull of a lawyer? Where be his quiddities now, his quillets, his cases, his tenures, and his tricks?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "The age is grown so picked that the toe of the peasant comes so near the heel of the courtier, he galls his kibe."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now; your gambols, your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "To what base uses we may return, Horatio!
    So hallow'd and so gracious is the time."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "Imperious Cæsar, dead and turned to clay,
    Might stop a hole to keep the wind away."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "Lay her i' the earth;
    And from her fair and unpolluted flesh
    May violets spring!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "A ministering angel shall my sister be."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "Sweets to the sweet: farewell!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "I thought thy bride-bed to have decked, sweet maid,
    And not have strewed thy grave."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "Though I am not splenitive and rash,
    Yet have I something in me dangerous."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "I loved Ophelia: Forty thousand brothers
    Could not, with all their quantity of love,
    Make up my sum."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "Let Hercules himself do what he may,
    The cat will mew and dog will have his day."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.1

  • "There's a divinity that shapes our ends, Rough-hew them how we will."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "I once did hold it, as our statists do,
    A baseness to write fair, and labored much
    How to forget that learning; but, sir, now
    It did me yeoman's service."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "There's a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, 'tis not to come; if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come: the readiness is all."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "I have shot mine arrow o'er the house,
    And hurt my brother."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "A hit, a very palpable hit."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "I am justly killed with my own treachery."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "This fell sergeant, death,
    Is strict in his arrest."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "Report me and my cause aright
    To the unsatisfied."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "I am more an antique Roman than a Dane."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart,
    Absent thee from felicity awhile,
    And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain,
    To tell my story."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "The rest is silence."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "Now cracks a noble heart. Good-night, sweet prince,
    And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!"
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "Rosencrantz and Guilderstern are dead."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

  • "Let four captains
    Bear Hamlet, like a soldier, to the stage;
    For he was likely, had he been put on,
    To have proved most royally."
    - William Shakespeare, Hamlet 5.2

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Your Citation
Lombardi, Esther. "'Hamlet' Quotes." ThoughtCo, May. 16, 2014, thoughtco.com/hamlet-quotes-739999. Lombardi, Esther. (2014, May 16). 'Hamlet' Quotes. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/hamlet-quotes-739999 Lombardi, Esther. "'Hamlet' Quotes." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/hamlet-quotes-739999 (accessed September 19, 2017).