Hammurabi

Hammurabi
Hammurabi. Clipart.com

King Hammurabi was an important Babylonian king known best for an early law code, that we refer to by his name. He united Mesopotamia and turned Babylonia into an important power.

Some refer to Hammurabi as Hammurapi

Code of Hammurabi

Hammurabi is now synonymous with his code of laws, referred to as the Code of Hammurabi. Five columns of the stele on which his laws were written (inscribed) have been erased.

Scholars estimate the total number of legal judgments contained on the stele when it was intact would have been around 300.

The stele may not actually containĀ laws, per se, as judgments made by Hammurabi. By recording the judgments he made, the stele would have served to testify to and honor King Hammurabi's acts and deeds.

Hammurabi and the Bible

Hammurabi may have been the Biblical Amraphel, King of Sennaar, mentioned in the Bible book of Genesis.

Hammurabi Dates

Hammurabi was the sixth king of the First Babylonian dynasty -- about 4000 years ago. We don't know for sure when -- during a general period running from 2342 to 1050 B.C. -- he ruled, but the standard Middle Chronology puts his dates at 1792-1750. (Put that date in context by looking at the major events timeline.) [Source]

Military Accomplishment of Hammurabi

In the 30th year of his reign, Hammurabi removed his country from vassalage to Elam by obtaining a military victory against its king.

He then conquered the land west of Elam, Iamuthala, and Larsa. Following these conquests, Hammurabi called himself King of Akkad and Sumer. Hammurabi also conquered Rabiqu, Dupliash, Kar-Shamash, Turukku (?), Kakmum, and Sabe. His kingdom extended to Assyria and northern Syria.

More Accomplishments of Hammurabi

In addition to being a warrior, Hammurabi built temples, dug canals, promoted agriculture, established justice, and promoted literary activity.

Hammurabi is on the list of Most Important People to Know in Ancient History.