Heavy Putter

Heavy Putter B1
The B1 model of the Heavy Putter is a center-shafted mallet. Heavy Putter Company

The Bottom Line

The Heavy Putter is going to be too heavy for some; its alignment aids are not very strong, and we didn't feel we had great control of our distances on longer putts. But this putter produces a great pendulum stroke. Anyone who struggles on short putts, particularly as a result of being too handsy or yippy, should check out the Heavy Putter.

Pros

  • All that weight keeps the putter moving online for a great pendulum stroke, if you start it online.
  • Helps golfer achieve good tempo.
  • Helps golfers who struggle with a handsy or yippy stroke on short putts.
  • Very strong on distance and direction control on short putts.
  • Back end works great for scooping the ball up off the green.

Cons

  • Distance control a little less on longer putts.
  • Lack of strong sightlines for alignment.
  • Is going to be too heavy for some.

Description

  • Clubheads of the Heavy Putter are nearly twice as heavy as "normal" putters.
  • Weight insert in shaft moves balance point much higher up shaft than in conventional putters.
  • Combined, these ingredients make the Heavy Putters the heaviest to be ruled USGA conforming.
  • All that weight designed to produce stability in the stroke.
  • Head weight can be customized with a tip-weight kit that includes differently weighted screws.
  • Heavy Putters are made of 303 Stainless Steel, have extreme heel-toe weighting and face-balanced.
  • Heavy Putters come in six models, variations of two head shapes and three hosel alignments.
  • MSRP at time of writing is $239.

Guide Review - Heavy Putter

There was a good range of reactions to the Heavy Putter among golfers who tried it along with us. The majority has strongly positive reactions, but a solid minority felt they'd recommend others against it. That's a good demonstration of how important feel is in a putter, and how that "feel" often feels very different from golfer to golfer.

As for ourselves, we fell in the middle. Overall, we liked the Heavy Putter. But in the end it's just too, well, heavy for our personal tastes.

The Heavy Putter comes in six models, and we were using and sharing the B1 model, a center-shafted mallet. The clubheads of Heavy Putters weigh nearly twice as much as "normal" putters, plus there is a 250-gram insert near the top of the shaft.

All that weight has one effect that everyone agreed on: get this clubhead started on the right line, and it becomes much more difficult to mess up your stroke. The Heavy Putter is tailormade for a pendulum stroke. Tempo is an issue many golfers struggle with on the greens, but the Heavy Putter is a cinch to rock back-and-forth.

The lack of bold sightlines for alignment was something else everyone commented on. There are circular holes behind the clubface, and a grooved area that designates an aiming position. But there is nothing that stands out against the metallic body of the putter.

Distance and direction control were great on short putts, but we had trouble with distance control on longer putters (not everyone did, however).