How to Build a Skateboard Kicker Ramp

Kicker Ramps instructions for Skateboarding, Bikes and More

Teenage girl with skateboard
Teenage girl with skateboard. Hero Images/Getty Images

A kicker skateboard ramp is one of the easier ramps to build and doesn't take that much money. Kicker ramps are a lot of fun to play with - perfect for launching yourself, getting some air and doing tricks. You can also easily use this kicker ramp for bikes, or anything else! Also, kicker ramps are on the smaller side, so they're easier to put away. The kicker skateboard ramp that you will build with these instructions will come out to 6 feet long, 4 feet wide and a foot and a half tall.

Photos and instructions are thanks to Jason over at DIYskate.com.

How to Build a Kicker Ramp for Skateboarding
Skateboarding Kicker Ramp Building Instructions. Jason, from DIYskate.com

To build your skateboard kicker ramp, you're going to need some building materials. Most of this stuff can be bought at a home improvement store like Lowes or Home Depot. For the piece of steel, you might find it at a store like Home Depot, but if not, look for "Steel" in your local businesses. Here are the building materials used for making this skateboard kicker ramp:

  • Two 4×8, 3/4" thick plywood sheets
  • One 4×8, 1/4" thick Masonite sheet
  • Five 2×4 boards, 8' long
  • One 1 pound box of 1 5/8" screws
  • One 1 pound box of 2 1/2" screws
  • One 10 inches × 4 foot, 3/16" thick piece of steel

Here's a list of the tools that you'll be using for this project:

  • Tape Measure & Pencil
  • Circular saw
  • Drill w/ Phillips bit
  • 3/16" drill bit
  • 3/8" drill bit
How to Build a Kicker Ramp for Skateboarding
Skateboarding Kicker Ramp Building Instructions. Jason, from DIYskate.com

After you've gathered the materials, the next step is to start cutting. Out of the 8' long 2X4 boards, cut each one into two boards that are 3' 10.5" long.

Next, cut one of the pieces of plywood down to 4' by 6' 2".

The other piece of plywood should be cut in the shape shown in the picture here (click the picture for a larger view).

These sizes can all be adjusted, and you can make a larger or smaller kicker ramp if you want - these instructions are for this one size. If you want to change things, however, make sure that you know what you're doing! You don't want to mess up your entire project and have to start over, or worse yet, get someone hurt!

How to Build a Kicker Ramp for Skateboarding
Skateboarding Kicker Ramp Building Instructions. Jason, from DIYskate.com

Just like you can see in the picture, screw two 2X4 cross beams in. These are from the stack of 10 2X4 boards that you should have cut and made in the last step!

How to Build a Kicker Ramp for Skateboarding
Skateboarding Kicker Ramp Building Instructions. Jason, from DIYskate.com

Now attach the other 8 2X4s along the top as shown. Start from the bottom, and measure them out 8" from the middle of one to the middle of the next one. Make sure that the 2X4s are flat along the top edge of the sides.

How to Build a Kicker Ramp for Skateboarding
Skateboarding Kicker Ramp Building Instructions. Jason, from DIYskate.com

Now screw on the piece of plywood that you should have left (it should be 3/4" thick, 4' wide and 6'2" long. You want the bottom edge of the plywood to just barely touch the ground, and go to the very top edge of the ramp.

How to Build a Kicker Ramp for Skateboarding
Skateboarding Kicker Ramp Building Instructions. Jason, from DIYskate.com

The plywood now gets covered with the sheet of Masonite. This sheet of Masonite should be 1/4" thick, 4' wide and 5'8" long. Attach it so that it goes all the way up to the top edge of the ramp. You'll notice that it doesn't go all the way to the bottom - that's OK!

While you are screwing this part on, DIYskate.com warns to make sure that you are screwing this sheet into the studs underneath the sheet of plywood, and not just into the plywood. He suggests using a chalk line for this.

I'd like to add that you also want to make sure that your screws are in nice and tight - you don't want them sticking up at ALL. AT ALL. AAAAAT ALLLL.

How to Build a Kicker Ramp for Skateboarding
Skateboarding Kicker Ramp Building Instructions. Jason, from DIYskate.com

If all of this math has combined correctly, you should have exactly the right amount of space to attach the steel at the bottom. Attaching the steel is tricky - here's how DIYskate.com explains it - "Drill a 3/16" hole about 2 inches in from each side and one in the middle. After the holes are drilled, countersink each by using the 3/8" drill bit to drill down just enough so the screw heads are flush."

Once you have the entire ramp built, go back over it and make sure you don't have any screws sticking out at all. You'll probably want to do this again after a few days of using the ramp, and then every once in a while after that! Nothing will ruin your day more than catching a screw!

Jason from DIYskate.com suggests attaching an old pair of trucks with wheels to the back of the ramp, that way you can move it around easier. Then you could just lift it from the front steel plate, tilt it up until those wheels touch the ground, and then wheel it around easier.

If you leave your kicker skateboarding ramp outside, then you'll need to protect it somehow or the elements will start to tear it down before you even have a chance to wreck going off of it! There are several things DIYskate.com suggests:

  • You can build the entire ramp out of pressure treated lumber. This will help it last longer, but it will cost more to buy. Also, as you cut it, don't breathe in the sawdust - the chemicals they treat the wood with is harsh.
  • You can paint it! Did you know that paint does more than just look nice - it protects stuff!
  • You can cover it with a tarp. This one is pretty obvious, especially if it rains. Don't just leave your ramp out in the weather, and then expect it not to warp and get weak!

So there you go! Building your own kicker skateboarding ramp is easy, won't take too much time, and should cost you less than a hundred bucks when you're all through. Enjoy!