Italian Verb Conjugations: 'Morire' (to Die)

End of the road at North Cape, Prince Edward Island
 Danielle Donders/Getty Images

The Italian verb morire means to die, fade, come to an end, or vanish. It is an irregular third-conjugation verb. Morire is an intransitive verb, meaning it does not take a direct object.

Conjugating "Morire"

The table gives the pronoun for each conjugation—io (I), tu (you), lui, lei (he, she), noi (we), voi (you plural), and loro (their). The tenses and moods are given in Italian—presente (present),  passato prossimo (present perfect), imperfetto (imperfect), trapassato prossimo (past perfect), passato remoto (remote past), trapassato remoto (preterite perfect), futuro semplice (simple future), and futuro anteriore (future perfect)first for the indicative, followed by the subjunctive, conditional, infinitive, participle, and gerund forms.

INDICATIVE/INDICATIVO

Presente
io muoio
tu muori
lui, lei, Lei muore
noi moriamo
voi morete
loro, Loro muorono
Imperfetto
io morevo
tu morevi
lui, lei, Lei moreva
noi morevamo
voi morevate
loro, Loro morevano​
Passato remoto
io morii
tu moristi
lui, lei, Lei mori
noi morimmo
voi moriste
loro, Loro morino​
Futuro semplice
io mor(i)rò
tu mor(i)rai​
lui, lei, Lei mor(i)rà
noi mor(i)remo
voi mor(i)rete
loro, Loro mor(i)ranno​
Passato prossimo
io sono morto/a
tu sei morto/a​
lui, lei, Lei è morto/a
noi siamo morti/e
voi siete morti/e
loro, Loro sono morti/e​
Trapassato prossimo
io ero morto/a
tu eri morto/a
lui, lei, Lei era morto/a
noi eravamo morti/e
voi eravate morti/e
loro, Loro erano morti/e
Trapassato remoto
io fui morto/a
tu fosti morto/a
lui, lei, Lei fu morto/a
noi fummo morti/e
voi foste morti/e
loro, Loro furono morti/e
Future anteriore
io sarò morto/a
tu sarai morto/a
lui, lei, Lei sarà morto/a
noi saremo morti/e
voi sarete morti/e
loro, Loro saranno morti/e

SUBJUNCTIVE/CONGIUNTIVO

Presente
io muoia
tu muoia
lui, lei, Lei muoia
noi moriamo
voi moriate
loro, Loro muoiano
Imperfetto
io morissi
tu morissi
lui, lei, Lei morisse
noi morissimo
voi moriste
loro, Loro morissero
Passato
io sia morto/a
tu sia morto/a
lui, lei, Lei sia morto/a
noi siamo morti/e
voi siate morti/e
loro, Loro siano morti/e
Trapassato
io fossi morto/a
tu fossi morto/a
lui, lei, Lei fosse morto/a
noi fossimo morti/e​
voi foste morti/e
loro, Loro fossero morti/e

CONDITIONAL/CONDIZIONALE

Presente
io mor(i)rei
tu mor(i)resti
lui, lei, Lei mor(i)rebbe
noi mor(i)remmo
voi mor(i)reste
loro, Loro mor(i)rebbero
Passato
io sarei morto/a
tu saresti morto/a
lui, lei, Lei sarebbe morto/a
noi saremmo morti/e
voi sareste morti/e
loro, Loro sarebbero morti/e

IMPERATIVE/IMPERATIVO

Passato
io
tu muori
lui, lei, Lei muoia
noi moriamo
voi morite
loro, Loro muoiano

INFINITIVE/INFINITO

Presente: morire

Passato: essere morto

PARTICIPLE/PARTICIPIO

Presente: morente

Passato: morto

GERUND/GERUNDIO

Presente: morendo

Passato: essendo morto

"Voglio Morire!" Suicide in Italian Literature

Suicide was a widespread theme in 19th-century Italian literature. A book titled "Voglio Morire! Suicide in Italian Literature, Culture, and Society 1789-1919" provides the details about this dark theme. Voglio morire! literally transelates as "I want to die, and the publisher's description notes that suicide was a popular topic with Italian writers from the time of the French Revolution until the outbreak of World War II:

"A number of writers, intellectuals, politicians, and artists wrote about suicide, and a very high number of people killed themselves. ... In Italy, once a very traditional, Catholic country, where suicide was very uncommon and rarely treated as a subject of moral theology or literature, it suddenly became extremely widespread."

Such Italian writers as Ugo Foscolo, Emilio Salgari, Giuseppe Pellizza da Volpedo, Giacomo Leopardi, and Carlo Michelstaedter thoroughly examined the verb morire, and the idea it represented, in their varied works.

Source

Unknown. "Voglio Morire! Suicide in Italian Literature, Culture, and Society 1789-1919." Hardcover, Unabridged edition edition, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, March 1, 2013.