A Job Opportunity Listening Comprehension Quiz

Having a discussion
Evaluating a situation. Westend61 / Getty Images

In this listening comprehension you will hear two people talking about a new job opportunity. You will hear the listening twice. Write down the answers to the questions. After you have finished, click on the arrow to see if you have answered the questions correctly.

Listen to the Job Opportunity listen comprehension.

A Job Opportunity Listening Quiz

  1. Who needs a job?
  2. Where is she?
  3. Who is offering the job?
  1. What is the position?
  2. What is the pay?
  3. What requirements are asked for?
  4. What type of person is desired?
  5. What can she earn besides the salary?

Listening Dialogue Transcript

Woman 1: Hey, I think I found a job that might interest Sue. Where is she?
Woman 2: She's not in today. Went on a trip to Leeds, I think. What is it?

Woman 1: Well, it's from a magazine called London Week which claims to be the only newspaper for visitors to London. 
Woman 2: What do they want? A reporter? 

Woman 1: No, it's what they call a "sales executive has to sell with unique benefits of the magazine to agencies and clients in London." 
Woman 2: Hmmm, could be interesting. How much does it pay?

Woman 1: Fourteen thousand plus commission.
Woman 2: Not bad at all! Do they specify what they want?

Woman 1: Sales people with up to two years of experience. Not necessarily in advertising. Sue's got plenty of that.  
Woman 2: Yeah! Nothing else?

Woman 1: Well, they want bright, enthusiastic young people. 
Woman 2: No trouble there! Any other details about job conditions?

Woman 1: No, just the commission on top of the salary. 
Woman 2: Well, let's tell Sue! She'll be in tomorrow I expect. 

Language Notes

In this listening selection, the English you hear is colloquial.

It's not slang. However, many short common phrases such as "Is there, Are there, That's, etc.", as well as question beginnings are sometimes dropped. Listen for the context of the phrases, and the meaning will be clear. These types of short phrases are necessary when writing, but are often dropped in casual conversation. Here are a few examples from the listening selection:

Any other details about job conditions?
Nothing else?
Not bad at all!

Understand but Don't Copy

Unfortunately, spoken English is often much different than the English we learn in class. Verbs are dropped, subjects are not included, and slang is used. While it's important to notice these differences, it's probably best to not copy the speech, especially if it's slang. For example, in the United States many people use the word "like" in a wide variety of situations. Understand that the "like" is not necessary, and understand based on the context of the conversation. However, don't pick up this bad habit just because a native speaker uses it!

Listening Quiz Answers 

  1. Sue
  2. On a trip to Leeds
  3. A magazine - London Week
  4. A sales executive
  5. 14,000
  6. Sales people with up to two years experience
  7. Bright and enthusiastic
  8. A commission