Latin Cardinal Numbers - For Counting

Counting to five
BahadirTanriover/ E+/ Getty Images

Latin numbers are usually adjectives. When there are three forms, the Latin number has a masculine, feminine, and neuter form, in that order. The numbers follow the appropriate declension rules. Note that there is no singular form for most of the numbers and no plural form for the number 1.

Here are the cardinal numbers, the "one", "two", "three", etc. of Latin. For the "first", "second", "third", etc., see the Latin Ordinal Numbers.

1 - unus, una, unum

2 - duo, duae, duo

3 - tres, tres, tria

4 - quattuor

5 - quinque

6 - sex

7 - septem

8 - octo

9 - novem

10 - decem

11 - undecim

12 - duodecim

13 - tredecim

14 - quattuordecim

15 - quindecim

16 - sedecim

17 - septendecim

18 - duodeviginti

19 - undeviginti

20 - viginti

21 - viginti unus

30 - triginta

40 - quadraginta

50 - quinquaginta

60 - sexaginta

70 - septuaginta

80 - octoginta

90 - nonaginta

100 - centum

200 - ducenti, ducentae, ducenta

300 - trecenti, trecentae, trecenta

400 - quadrigenti, quadrigentae, quadrigenta(*)

500 - quingenti, quingentae, quingenta

600 - sescenti, sescentae, sescenta

700 - septingenti, septingentae, septingenta

800 - octingenti, octingentae, octingenta

900 - nongenti, nongentae, nongenta

1000 - mille

2000 - duo milia

Romance Languages: Counting Numbers

 EngLatinFrenchItalianSpanish
1oneunusununouno
2twoduodeuxduedos
3threetrestroistretres
4fourquattuorquatrequattrocuatro
5fivequinquecinqcinquecinco
6sixsexsixseiseis
7sevenseptemseptsettesiete
8eightoctohuitottoocho
9ninenovemneufnovenueve
10tendecemdixdiecidiez

For contrast with another Indo-European language, the Sanskrit numbers (and Hindi) are:

  1. éka (ek)
  2. dvi (do)
  3. trí (tīn)
  4. catúr (chār)
  5. pañca (pāṅc)
  6. ṣáṣ (chaḥ)
  7. saptá (sāt)
  8. aṣṭá (āṭh)
  9. náva (nau)
  10. dasa (das)​