Learn Greetings and Other Everyday Expressions in Japanese

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Ohayou gozaimasu (Good morning)

Saying

Japanese people greet each other in many different ways depending on the time of day. Some greetings also differ depending on the relationship you have with the person you are greeting.

One can also say just "Ohayou (おはよう)". This is casual, and should not be used with one's boss.

Please check out the instinctual video, How to Say Good Morning in Japanese to learn the pronunciation of Ohayou gozaimasu.

Click here to learn more with my "Introductory Japanese Lessons".

02
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Konnichiwa (Hello/Good afternoon)

Konnichiwa (Hello/Good afternoon)

There is a rule for writing hiragana "wa" and "ha." When "wa" is used as a particle, it is written in hiragana as "ha." "Konnichiwa" is now a fixed greeting. However, in the old days it was a part of sentence such as "Today is ~ (Konnichi wa ~)" and "wa" functioned as a particle. That's why it is still written in hiragana as "ha."

Please check out the instinctual video, How to Say Good Afternoon in Japanese to learn the pronunciation of Konnichiwa.

03
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Konbanwa (Good evening)

Konbanwa (Good evening)

There is a rule for writing hiragana "wa" and "ha." When "wa" is used as a particle, it is written in hiragana as "ha." "Konbanwa" is now a fixed greeting. However, in the old days it was a part of sentence such as "Tonight is ~ (Konban wa ~)" and "wa" functioned as a particle. That's why it is still written in hiragana as "ha."

Please check out the instinctual video, How to Say Good Evening in Japanese to learn the pronunciation of Konbanwa.

04
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Oyasuminasai (Good night)

Oyasuminasai (Good night)

Unlike English, "Oyasuminasai (おやすみなさい) is mostly used before going to bed. "Oyasumi (おやすみ)" is also used.

05
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Sayonara (Good-bye)

Sayonara (Good-bye)

"Sayounara (さようなら)" can be also used instead of "sayonara (さよなら)." People do not say "sayonara (さよなら)" when leaving their own home. "Ittekimasu(いってきます)" is normally used. The response to "Ittekimasu (いってきます)" is "Itterasshai (いってらっしゃい)". "Dewa mata (ではまた)" is also often used as "see you later", similar to the English expression.

How about "See you tomorrow"? "Tomorrow" is "ashita (明日)" in Japanese. I think you can guess what the the answer is: "Mata ashita (また明日)".

Click here to learn more with my "Introductory Japanese Lessons".