Madonna's 38 Top 10 Pop Songs

Complete List of Madonna's Biggest Hit Singles

Madonna first hit the top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 with "Borderline" in 1984. This is a complete list of her top 10 pop singles from "Borderline" through the present. No artist has amassed more top 10 pop hits in the rock era than Madonna.

Released in February 1984, "Borderline" became Madonna's first top 10 pop single. It remains one of the top favorites among fans and critics of her singles. The song was written and composed by Reggie Lucas who was the primary producer of Madonna's self-titled debut album. A remix by Madonna's boyfriend at the time John "Jellybean" Benitez added to "Borderline's" popularity in dance clubs. MTV's heavy rotation of the accompanying video is given credit for helping the song climb the pop charts.

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"Lucky Star" followed closely after the top 10 success of "Borderline." It was released in August 1984 and debuted in the top half of the Billboard Hot 100. "Lucky Star" became Madonna's first top 5 hit single in a string of 16 consecutive top 5 releases. The accompanying video caused a stir by showing Madonna writhing on the floor and showing off her belly button.

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"Like a Virgin" is the title single from Madonna's second solo album. It was the first single from the collection and appeared in October 1984 just two months after "Lucky Star." Nile Rodgers of the disco group Chic was the producer. "Like a Virgin" became a signature song of sorts for Madonna as it topped the pop singles chart, becoming her first #1 hit, and spent six weeks there. It was at the top of the chart by the end of the year, and Madonna made history of sorts when she performed "Like a Virgin" in a wedding gown perched atop a wedding cake at the 1984 MTV Video Music Awards. The accompanying music video set a high standard with much of it shot on location in Venice, Italy.

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"Material Girl" was released in January 1985 just as "Like a Virgin" was vacating the upper reaches of the pop singles chart. It is another Nile Rodgers production co-written by disco star Peter Brown. The music video for "Material Girl" was celebrated for its wry tribute to Marilyn Monroe in mannerisms and style. The song peaked at #2 on the pop singles chart becoming Madonna's third consecutive top 5 hit.

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"Crazy for You" was Madonna's first single release from a movie soundtrack. It appears in the film Vision Quest. Released in March 1985 it was also Madonna's first ballad hit. "Crazy for You" went to the top of the charts becoming Madonna's second #1 pop single.

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"Angel" was released as the third single from Madonna's Like a Virgin album. There was no music video accompanying its release just a month after "Crazy For You," but that did not stop it from continuing Madonna's hot streak and landing at #5. Today it has been overshadowed by its 12-inch single companion "Into the Groove." The pair combined to be one of the bestselling 12-inch singles of all time. "Into the Groove" remains one of Madonna's most popular songs never released as an official single. It was included on the soundtrack to the film Desperately Seeking Susan.

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"Dress You Up" became the fourth single to hit the top 5 from the album Like a Virgin. With the song, Madonna ran afoul of Tipper Gore's Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC) who cited the song for sexual content of its lyrics particularly the line, "Gonna dress you up in my love." A live video of Madonna performing "Dress You Up" in concert was used to promote the single.

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"Live to Tell" was released in March 1986 and included on the soundtrack for Sean Penn's, at the time Madonna's husband, film At Close Range. It was co-produced and co-written by frequent collaborator Patrick Leonard. Eight weeks after its first appearance on the Billboard Hot 100 "Live to Tell" became Madonna's third #1 hit single. She has said that the song is about the lying that went on in her relationship with her parents. Live performances of the song created considerable controversy on the 2006 Confessions tour when Madonna performed the song while appearing to hang from a lighted cross.

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While many assume that the song "Papa Don't Preach" was written directly from Madonna's personal experience or point of view, the song was actually brought to her by songwriter Brian Elliott. He says the song was written based on gossip he overheard from teen girls. Madonna only contributed minor edits in the song's lyrics. "Papa Don't Preach" reached #1 on the pop singles chart, but it also brought more controversy. A number of groups, including anti-abortion activists, accused Madonna of promoting teen pregnancy through the song.

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"True Blue" is the title song from Madonna's third studio album. It was co-written and co-produced by Stephen Bray and presented a more light and distinctly retro feel after her recent controversial singles. The song was released in September 1986 and debuted inside the top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 at #40.

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"Open Your Heart" began life as a rock song titled "Follow Your Heart" intended for Cyndi Lauper. However, after Madonna helped re-orient it as a dance-pop track, "Open Your Heart" became the fourth single from the album True Blue and ultimately went all the way to #1. The music video generated both acclaim and criticism with its depiction of Madonna as a peepshow dancer befriending a young boy.

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"La Isla Bonita" was released in February 1987 as the fifth single from True Blue. It was the first of Madonna's top 10 singles to incorporate a Latin feel. The song was first offered to Michael Jackson. Madonna worked with Patrick Leonard to re-write some of the lyrics and "La Isla Bonita" became another top 5 pop hit. The accompanying video included an appearance by actor Benicio del Toro.

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"Who's That Girl" is the title song from the movie starring Madonna. The film did poorly both critically and financially, but that did not hurt the fortunes of the song. It continued Madonna's interest in Latin and Spanish influences incorporating Spanish lyrics. "Who's That Girl" became Madonna's sixth #1 hit single, and she became the first woman to have six #1 hits as a solo artist.

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"Causing a Commotion" was released in August 1987 as the second single from the Who's That Girl soundtrack. The song was co-written and co-produced by Stephen Bray and an acclaimed remix was released by Shep Pettibone. "Causing a Commotion" peaked at #2 on the pop singles chart kept out of the top spot by Michael Jackson's "Bad."

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More than a year passed before the release of Madonna's next single. When it did appear in February 1989, the single "Like a Prayer" was acclaimed as a stunning achievement. It went straight to the top of the pop singles chart and is often cited as the top song of Madonna's career. The arresting video created by Mary Lambert to accompany "Like a Prayer" intensified tension between Madonna and the Roman Catholic Church. Among the images that appear are Madonna with stigmata, suggestion of making love to an iconic saint, and burning crosses.

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Madonna made her support for empowerment of women absolutely clear with the release of the song "Express Yourself." Future film director David Fincher put together the promotional video for "Express Yourself" utilizing imagery inspired by the classic silent film Metropolis. With a budget of $5 million it was the most expensive music video made up to that point in time. "Express Yourself" is frequently hailed as one of the top music videos of all time.

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"Cherish" was released in August 1989 as the third single from the Like a Prayer album. It has a distinctly lighter feel from the album's two previous singles. The accompanying music video is in black and white and directed by fashion photographer Herb Ritts. It includes an appearance by model Tony Ward, a former lover of Madonna's who also made a notable appearance in the video for "Justify My Love." "Cherish" was Madonna's record-setting 16th consecutive top 5 hit.

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Madonna began the 1990's by missing the top 5 of the pop singles chart for the first time since 1984. Her single "Oh Father" failed to even make it to the top 10. "Keep It Together" was released as the fifth single from the Like a Prayer album and returned Madonna to the top 10. "Keep It Together" lyrically is an inspirational and impassioned tribute to the importance of family and supporting those who are close to you. It was the final collaboration with songwriter and producer Stephen Bray released as a single.

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Reportedly created as a hurried B-side for the "Keep It Together" single by Madonna and dance music producer and remixer Shep Pettibone, "Vogue" was presented to record company executives and they decided to hold it back as its own single release. Released in March 1990, the song is partly inspired by a style of dancing called vogueing common in the gay underground in New York. David Fincher put together a black and white old Hollywood style video to accompany the single, and "Vogue" became Madonna's biggest worldwide success to date topping the charts in over 30 countries.

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"Hanky Panky" was the key single release from the soundtrack to the film Dick Tracy starring Madonna and Warren Beatty. It generated controversy with its racy lyrics and Madonna's statement that the song is, "about a spanking, but not the kind that you get when you're bad."

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"Justify My Love" was released in November 1990 as the first single from Madonna's greatest hits project The Immaculate Collection. MTV banned the promotional video due to sexual content. This created an immediate rush to see the video. It was released for sale as a video single and became an immediate bestseller. ABC's TV news magazine Nightline aired the video in its entirety and invited Madonna on to discuss the controversy. Commercially "Justify My Love" became another #1 hit for Madonna.

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The second single from the greatest hits project The Immaculate Collection was "Rescue Me." The song was co-written and co-produced by Shep Pettibone and generated none of the controversy that swirled around "Justify My Love." It was officially released in February 1991 and peaked at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100.

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"This Used to Be My Playground" is a battle that was used as theme music for the movie A League Of Their Own which starred Tom Hanks, Geena Davis, Rosie O'Donnell and Madonna. It was recorded during sessions for the upcoming Erotica album. Released in June 1992, the song reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in August to become Madonna's tenth #1 hit.

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"Erotica" arrived as the first single and title song from Madonna's album Erotica in October 1992. A slightly altered version of the song titled "Erotic" was packaged with Madonna's controversial Sex book. The frank sexual content of the song caused Vatican City to ban Madonna from the state and remove her music from any radio stations that broadcast there. "Erotica" debuted at #13 on the Billboard Hot 100 but only managed to rise to #3 for its peak.

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"Deeper and Deeper" was the second single from the Erotica album and a straightforward disco style song. It was co-produced and co-written with Shep Pettibone. The accompanying video is an homage to pop artist Andy Warhol and his films with Madonna's performance obviously owing a debt to Edie Sedgwick.

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After two singles from Erotica failed to make the top 10, Madonna returned with the single "I'll Remember," a ballad and theme song for the movie With Honors, in March 1994. Madonna worked with her old collaborator Patrick Leonard in writing and producing the song. "I'll Remember" was prevented from reaching #1 by All-4-One's smash hit "I Swear."

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"Secret" is the first single from Madonna's album Bedtime Stories. The marketing of the song was innovative for 1994 in its promotion via the Internet. A 30-second preview of the single was made available to fans before release.

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"Take a Bow" was the second single from Madonna's Bedtime Stories album. It is a ballad co-written and co-produced by R&B star Babyface. The song reached the top of the charts and spent the longest at #1, seven weeks, of any of Madonna's hits. In addition to being her 11th #1 pop single, "Take a Bow" became Madonna's fifth adult contemporary #1.

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"You'll See" was the first single released from Madonna's 1995 ballad compilation Something To Remember. The accompanying video was a sequel to the clip put together for "Take a Bow" featuring Madonna and a bullfighter. "You'll See" became a massive international hit peaking at #6 in the US.

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Many eyebrows were raised when Madonna successfully lobbied for and received the lead role in the film version of the musical Evita about the life of Argentina's Eva Peron. Despite the concerns Madonna received mostly positive notices for her performance and she turned the musical's best known song "Don't Cry for Me Argentina" into a pop hit. Dance remixes aided in the song's success, and it became an international pop smash.

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"Frozen," the first single from Madonna's album Ray of Light, explored a range of new territory and textures musically including richer and deeper electronic sounds as well as eastern style strings and percussion. It was co-written by Patrick Leonard and co-produced by Leonard as well as electronica producer William Orbit. "Frozen" was Madonna's first single to ever debut at the top of the pop singles chart.

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"Ray Of Light" is the second single and the title song from Madonna's critically acclaimed album Ray of Light. It was released in May 1998 and debuted at #5 on the Billboard Hot 100, Madonna's highest opening yet. The song embraced electronica bringing the genre full force into the pop mainstream. The accompanying video was inspired by the film Koyanisqaatsi and took him Video of the Year honors from the 1998 MTV Video Music Awards.

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"Music" is the title song and first single from Madonna's eighth studio album. She collaborated with French electronic music producer Mirwais. The accompanying video for "Music" featured an appearance by Sacha Baron Cohen as his character Ali G. The song shot to #1 in countries around the world and became Madonna's 12th #1 in the US.

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"Don't Tell Me" was the second single from Madonna's Music album. It was released in January 1991. The accompanying video features Madonna dancing with cowboys. The song spent eight weeks in the top 10 although it only peaked at #4.

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"Die Another Day" is the theme song to the James Bond film Die Another Day. It was released in October 2002 near the twentieth anniversary of Madonna's career as a recording artist. Mirwais was again co-writer and co-producer. The song became the most commercially successful James Bond theme since Duran Duran's "A View to a Kill" in 1985.

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Following the relative commercial failure of her album American Life, Madonna built the first single from her tenth studio album Confessions on a Dance Floor around a sample from Abba's song "Gimme Gimme Gimme (A Man After Midnight)." This was only the second time Abba gave permission to sample one of their songs. The first time permission was granted to the Fugees. The song reached #1 in 45 different countries making "Hung Up" one of the biggest international hits of Madonna's career. In the US it was her 36th top 10 hit tying her with Elvis Presley's total.

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"4 Minutes" was released as the lead single from Madonna's album Hard Candy. She collaborated with Justin Timberlake and Timbaland. It became Madonna's 13th #1 hit single in the UK giving her the highest total for any female recording artists. In the US it moved Madonna ahead of Elvis Presley to give her the title of the recording artist with the most top 10 pop hits in the rock era.

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"Give Me All Your Luvin'" is the lead single from Madonna's album MDNA. It was featured in her Super Bowl halftime performance. Nicki Minaj and M.I.A. are featured in both the song and the accompanying music video. "Give Me All Your Luvin'" reached #1 in Canada.

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Lamb, Bill. "Madonna's 38 Top 10 Pop Songs." ThoughtCo, Aug. 22, 2016, thoughtco.com/madonnas-38-top-pop-songs-3245460. Lamb, Bill. (2016, August 22). Madonna's 38 Top 10 Pop Songs. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/madonnas-38-top-pop-songs-3245460 Lamb, Bill. "Madonna's 38 Top 10 Pop Songs." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/madonnas-38-top-pop-songs-3245460 (accessed September 22, 2017).