The Magic of Mabon

Looking for information about the magic of the Mabon season? Mabon is a time rich in magic, all connected to the changing seasons of the earth. Why not take advantage of nature's bounty, and work a little magic of your own? Learn about apple magic, kitchen witchery, and the blessings of hearth and home!

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Grapevines are often associated with abundance and fertility. Image by Patti Wigington 2009

Much like the apple, the grape is one of those fruits that has a significant amount of magic associated with it. First and foremost, the grape harvest -- and the wine that it produces -- has been associated with fertility deities like Egypt's Hathor, the lusty Roman Bacchus and his Greek counterpart, Dionysus. By the time of Mabon, grape arbors are flourishing. Vines, leaves and fruit are all usable items -- the leaves are often used in Mediterranean cooking, the vines for craft projects, and the grapes themselves are extremely versatile. Let's look at the Magic of Grapes.

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Apples are magical, especially around the time of the autumn harvest. Image by Patti Wigington, 2010

Apples have always been popular tools for foretelling the future. There are a number of traditional methods in folklore for using apples in divination. Apples are also associated with certain deities of the fall harvest season. Learn more about the Magical Energy of Apples.

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The oak tree has long been venerated by people of many cultures as a symbol of strength and power. Image by Images Etc Ltd/Moment Mobile/Getty Images

The acorn is a symbol of strength and power. In the fall, these tiny yet hardy little nuggets drop from the oak trees to land on the ground. Most will be eaten by passing wildlife, but a few will survive to form a new tree in the spring. In many cultures the oak is sacred, and is often connected to legends of deities who interact with mortals. Let's talk about the Magic of Acorns and Oaks.

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There are plenty of myths and legends about the magic of corn. Image by Garry Gay/Photographer's Choice/Getty Imagse

Of all the grains eaten in the world, corn - or maize - probably is surrounded by more legends and folklore than any other. Corn has been planted, tended, harvested and consumed for millennia, and so it’s no wonder that there are myths about the magical properties of this grain. Let’s take a look at some of the customs and traditions surrounding corn, which is ready to be harvested around Lammas and Mabon. Read more about Corn Magic and Folklore.

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Pokeweed is poisonous, but the berries can be used to make ink. Images by Panoramic Images/Getty Images

Pokeweed is a purplish-red berry found in many parts of North America. In the Midwest and most northern states, it blooms in early fall, typically around mid-September -- just in time for Mabon. With a little bit of work, you can make your own pokeweed ink to use in magical workings, particularly those used in banishing spells. Here's how to Make Pokeberry Ink.

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Use black salt to protect your property or belongings. Image © Patti Wigington 2012; Licensed to About.com

In many magical traditions, Lammas and Mabon are good times to work on protection magic, particularly that of the home and property. Let's take a look at some Protection Magic Folklore.

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If possible, have extra drums on hand for people who didn't bring their own. Image by Diane Labombarbe/E+/Getty Images

Mabon is a popular time for gatherings and get-togethers. If you've ever attended a public Pagan event, chances are good that somewhere, someone is drumming. You may not be able to see them, but you'll feel that pulsing rhythm off in the distance. In addition to being entertaining (and a great stress reliever), a drum circle serves another purpose - that of raising energy. Here's how to Host a Drum Circle.